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Legal Costs

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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1995
The Hampstead Town Council has approved transferring $24,000 budgeted for street repairs to pay for legal costs that have soared since July 1.Mayor Christopher M. Nevin told the council Tuesday night that the town's $12,000 budget for legal fees has been spent.Mr. Nevin said extra legal costs can be traced to the high number of ordinances recently introduced, the town's review of the final approval for the North Carroll Farms IV development, and a continuing correspondence with developers over the calculation of open space in four subdivisions.
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NEWS
February 10, 2013
Now that Comptroller Joan M. Pratt's lawsuit has been officially deemed frivolous and dismissed by Judge Pamela White "with prejudice" ("Pratt's suit over phone system is dismissed," Feb. 7), one major question remains. How much taxpayer money and city employee time and energy has been wasted with months and months of this shameless politicking? Comptroller Pratt alone brought the lawsuit alleging misuse of city funds, and Comptroller Pratt alone should be held accountable for any and all legal costs (her own misuse of funds)
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 17, 2001
CAMP HILL, Pa. - Rite Aid Corp., the target of a federal probe of its accounting practices, expects legal expenses of as much as $12 million in the next three quarters to defend against lawsuits and cooperate with investigators. The company forecast legal costs of $7 million to $12 million during the rest of the fiscal year ending in February 2002, the company said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. The costs do not include the $3.4 million in legal expenses the company had in the fiscal first quarter that ended June 2. Rite Aid, the third-biggest drugstore chain, is trying to boost sales and profit after three years of losses and an accounting scandal stemming from a rapid expansion under previous management.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Taxpayers have now been billed more than $42,000 in legal fees in the gender discrimination lawsuit against Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold, who has promised to repay the sum under certain conditions. The latest invoice doubles the previous tab charged to taxpayers by Thatcher Law Firm, the private attorneys hired by the county to defend Leopold after a conflict arose. Leopold announced last week that he would repay the county if found guilty in a lawsuit that alleges he physically assaulted a former employee and orchestrated her firing when she complained about him. Leopold has denied wrongdoing in the case.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
Anne Arundel County lawmakers passed legislation Monday night to give themselves more authority over large legal settlements, one of two pending bills related to losing lawsuits filed against the county government. The provision, passed 6-1, gives the council the right to refuse legal settlements greater than $100,000. Councilman John Grasso, a Glen Burnie Republican, voted against the bill. The council delayed until Oct. 15 final action on a separate measure that would allow the county to recoup legal costs when an employee's actions put it on the losing end of a lawsuit.
NEWS
February 10, 2013
Now that Comptroller Joan M. Pratt's lawsuit has been officially deemed frivolous and dismissed by Judge Pamela White "with prejudice" ("Pratt's suit over phone system is dismissed," Feb. 7), one major question remains. How much taxpayer money and city employee time and energy has been wasted with months and months of this shameless politicking? Comptroller Pratt alone brought the lawsuit alleging misuse of city funds, and Comptroller Pratt alone should be held accountable for any and all legal costs (her own misuse of funds)
NEWS
February 13, 2006
There's justice. There's frontier justice. And now there's Finney justice. The last is named after Jervis S. Finney, who has launched a one-man crusade against Stephen P. Amos. A former director of Parris N. Glendening's crime control office, Mr. Amos has been vindicated by, among others, an acting U.S. attorney who dropped an investigation against him more than a year ago. It was bad enough that Mr. Finney's vendetta has since prevented Mr. Amos from being reimbursed for $200,000 in legal costs - a standard practice in such cases.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
Deliberate misbehavior by Anne Arundel County employees could leave them on the hook for the county's legal costs under a new bill introduced Monday night. The legislation requires the county attorney to try to recoup from employees whose conduct ultimately put Anne Arundel's government on the losing end of a lawsuit. A second bill introduced Monday night gives the County Council final approval on any out-of-court settlements over $100,000. The bills are reactions to two pending federal lawsuits against the county filed over the conduct of County Executive John R. Leopold, the bills' sponsors said.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1999
After spending months embroiled in a string of unusual lawsuits, Carroll County's Board of Education agreed yesterday to pay $243,275 in legal fees to a Baltimore law firm -- and then voted to rehire the attorneys for another year. The school board unanimously approved during its regular meeting the payment of legal fees that have accrued since last year to Blum Yumkas Mailman Gutman & Denick. The sum includes $40,000 to defend federal and state circuit court lawsuits over the system's strict policy on underage drinking after 12 Westminster High School students were barred from extracurricular activities because they attended a party where other teens were drinking alcohol.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Taxpayers have now been billed more than $42,000 in legal fees in the gender discrimination lawsuit against Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold, who has promised to repay the sum under certain conditions. The latest invoice doubles the previous tab charged to taxpayers by Thatcher Law Firm, the private attorneys hired by the county to defend Leopold after a conflict arose. Leopold announced last week that he would repay the county if found guilty in a lawsuit that alleges he physically assaulted a former employee and orchestrated her firing when she complained about him. Leopold has denied wrongdoing in the case.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
A state has challenged Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold, a fellow Republican, to repay taxpayers if he loses a gender discrimination case that in two weeks rang up more than $21,000 legal fees. Leopold neither promised nor refused to repay the costs of defending him, but attacked the lawmaker for questioning his fiscal stewardship. Sen. Bryan Simonaire said Tuesday that he wanted to "help restore the trust" of county residents frustrated by the criminal indictment of Leopold, the conviction of a county councilman on a tax charge, and the two federal discrimination lawsuits pending against the county executive.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
Anne Arundel County lawmakers passed legislation Monday night to give themselves more authority over large legal settlements, one of two pending bills related to losing lawsuits filed against the county government. The provision, passed 6-1, gives the council the right to refuse legal settlements greater than $100,000. Councilman John Grasso, a Glen Burnie Republican, voted against the bill. The council delayed until Oct. 15 final action on a separate measure that would allow the county to recoup legal costs when an employee's actions put it on the losing end of a lawsuit.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
Deliberate misbehavior by Anne Arundel County employees could leave them on the hook for the county's legal costs under a new bill introduced Monday night. The legislation requires the county attorney to try to recoup from employees whose conduct ultimately put Anne Arundel's government on the losing end of a lawsuit. A second bill introduced Monday night gives the County Council final approval on any out-of-court settlements over $100,000. The bills are reactions to two pending federal lawsuits against the county filed over the conduct of County Executive John R. Leopold, the bills' sponsors said.
NEWS
September 22, 2011
As the executive director of the Housing Authority of Baltimore City, I'd like to correct misleading statements contained in a recent article ("Housing authority racks up legal bills," Sept. 18). The article gives the impression that HABC has spent $4 million in legal fees merely to avoid paying $12 million in court-ordered judgments in 10 cases. That is simply not true. These funds were spent to defend the agency in hundreds of cases. In 2009 alone, our defense saved HABC more than $100 million in unfounded claims.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
The Housing Authority of Baltimore City often cites a lack of funds to explain its refusal to pay nearly $12 million in court-ordered judgments to former public housing residents who suffered permanent lead-paint poisoning as children. But the city's public housing agency has paid private lawyers about $4 million since 2005 to defend against those lead-paint claims. In May and June alone it spent $228,000 on legal fees, a total that works out to more than $5,000 per day, including expenses.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2010
The foul sewage smells have stopped at the upscale Villas of Cattail Creek in Glenwood, and now the litigation that followed may be over too. Howard County government has reached agreement on terms of a settlement with the developers and builders of the community for seniors that was built with a shared septic system that never worked and was later replaced, according to an announcement. The developers have also posted a $350,000 performance bond with the county to help guarantee the system will work, and have made other changes to eliminate seasonal odors emanating as late as last fall from the new replacement system.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2010
The foul sewage smells have stopped at the upscale Villas of Cattail Creek in Glenwood, and now the litigation that followed may be over too. Howard County government has reached agreement on terms of a settlement with the developers and builders of the community for seniors that was built with a shared septic system that never worked and was later replaced, according to an announcement. The developers have also posted a $350,000 performance bond with the county to help guarantee the system will work, and have made other changes to eliminate seasonal odors emanating as late as last fall from the new replacement system.
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