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By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1994
The Daily Record Co., a news and printing company that was sold three months ago, has lost about a half-dozen management and editorial employees in recent weeks, including the company's former president and its legal affairs editor.The departures started about a month ago when former president Robert Dawson, whose title was changed to vice president soon after the company was sold in May, announced he would leave to become publisher of the Real Estate Review, a publication of the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Harmon and Amy Harmon,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 8, 2003
Settling lawsuits intended to strike fear in the hearts of college students who regularly download music over the Internet without paying for it, four students have agreed to pay the recording industry's trade association $12,000 to $17,000 each over the next three years. The suits were the first effort by the recording industry to take direct legal action against students in its efforts to stamp out Internet piracy, which has spiraled on college campuses despite the demise of Napster.
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BUSINESS
October 11, 1995
Promising to streamline business regulations, Gov. Parris N. Glendening has appointed study groups to quickly recommend ways to cut red tape.The groups will look at improving regulations and procedures applying to:* Assisted-living facilities for seniors and the disabled.* The laying of utility lines and its effect on commerce.* The Maryland Occupational Safety and Health agency.* State policies in buying services and goods.The groups, appointed from the ranks of business, labor and government, are expected to meet several times and to deliver recommendations by Nov. 21.The meetings are open.
BUSINESS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2000
Next time you install that new computer game or spreadsheet software, you may want to read the fine print. Today, Maryland becomes the first state in the nation to enact a controversial law on "clickwrap" software licenses - those annoying "I Agree" windows of legalese that most people click past without so much as a glance. Backed by industry heavyweights such as Microsoft and America Online, the Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act, or UCITA, is designed to bring a set of consistent rules to software contracts and clickable licensing agreements and give them more legal teeth in the courts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Harmon and Amy Harmon,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 8, 2003
Settling lawsuits intended to strike fear in the hearts of college students who regularly download music over the Internet without paying for it, four students have agreed to pay the recording industry's trade association $12,000 to $17,000 each over the next three years. The suits were the first effort by the recording industry to take direct legal action against students in its efforts to stamp out Internet piracy, which has spiraled on college campuses despite the demise of Napster.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 20, 1992
In a hot and brilliantly lit studio at Maryland Public Television in Owings Mills, a group of women sat around a horseshoe desk Wednesday night and discussed politics while cameras and tape machines whirred, clicked, hummed and recorded their images and words. It was some talk. The women were taping a new weekly PBS series. "To the Contrary," a national, prime-time news analysis show, features women as host and regular panelists, instead of the usual nearly all-male lineups.Host Bonnie Erbe, legal affairs correspondent for the Mutual/NBC Radio networks, asked panelist Kate O'Beirne of the Heritage Foundation what she thought of the presidential field and the expected nominations of Bill Clinton and George Bush after convincing wins by each the day before.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 20, 1992
In a hot and brilliantly lit studio at Maryland Public Television in Owings Mills, a group of women sat around a horseshoe desk Wednesday night and discussed politics while cameras and tape machines whirred, clicked, hummed and recorded their images and words. It was some talk. The women were taping a new weekly PBS series. "To the Contrary," a national, prime-time news analysis show features women as host and regular panelists, instead of the usual nearly all-male lineups.Host Bonnie Erbe, legal affairs correspondent for the Mutual/NBC Radio networks, asked panelist Kate O'Beirne of the Heritage Foundation what she thought of the presidential field and the expected nominations of Bill Clinton and George Bush after convincing wins by each the day before.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1998
Damian Bohager of Bohager's Bar & Grill Inc. is being threatened with involuntary bankruptcy by two of his brothers.The dispute dates to the 1992 death of Bernard C. Bohager Sr., who owned the Fells Point property at 515 S. Eden St. The building was put into a trust with equal ownership among his six children. Two of the children, Robert and Bernard Bohager Jr., were named trustees and now control the property. That same year, their younger brother, Damian Bohager, and several partners opened the bar and grill, paying rent to the trust.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1998
NationsBank N.A. has alleged fraud in a lawsuit it has filed seeking millions from the now-bankrupt Inphomation Communications Inc. and its owner, Michael W. Lasky.The Pikesville-based Inphomation Communications, better known as operator of the Psychic Friends Network, filed for federal bankruptcy protection Feb. 2, claiming assets of $1.2 million and liabilities of $26 million. Last month, citing evidence of "concealment, dishonesty and less than full disclosure," a federal bankruptcy judge ordered that an outside trustee be installed to replace the company's present management.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1997
Attorneys at Smith, Somerville & Case LLC have begun a mass exodus amid strong speculation that one of Baltimore's largest and oldest law firms will close its doors after Dec. 31. Local attorneys said the firm has failed to find a market niche.The most recent defection includes three partners and an associate who are leaving to join Hodes, Ulman, Pessin and Katz on Jan. 2, bringing that firm's total number of attorneys to 25, making it the largest in Baltimore County.In addition to those four, another group from 70-year-old Smith, Somerville is setting up its own boutique firm on Jan. 2.Michael J. Baxter, a partner at Smith, Somerville, announced he will create Baxter, Baker, Sidle & Conn along with eight other Smith, Somerville attorneys.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
An insurance company is demanding that former bank executive Charles W. Cole Jr. return $842,276 in disability benefits and unpaid premiums, claiming that he is healthy enough to work full time and mountain-climb in New Hampshire. Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against Cole, 64, who retired as chief executive of First National Bank of Maryland in 1994. Cole has been chairman and chief executive officer of Legg Mason Trust Co. in Baltimore since the summer.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1999
A federal judge in Baltimore yesterday gave creditors seeking the return of millions they claim were illegally siphoned out of a Columbia company the right to seize assets of a Florida businessmen and his family if they don't make timely payments under a settlement.Under the order signed by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge James T. Schneider, British investment house Wood Gundy London Ltd. and other creditors could seize assets, such as cars, homes and bank accounts, of William P. Trainor and family members.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1999
The model is familiar: A cash-starved but promising start-up, unable to afford the talent it needs, entices employees and outside contractors with shares of stock. When the company goes public, the shares soar, making them wealthy overnight.The new twist on the East Coast is that more and more of those reaping the riches of initial public offerings are lawyers, who have traditionally maintained an arms-length relationship with clients.For more than a decade, the practice of lawyers taking equity in client companies has been a staple of Silicon Valley's fast-growing high technology economy.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1999
Lawyers for the public relations firm that is suing Black & Decker Corp. filed a motion yesterday to lift the protective order that bars outside parties from reviewing court documents and prevents either side from discussing the case.The move followed a motion filed by The Sun Monday to open the records."That Black & Decker may be embarrassed by the disclosure of certain information provides an insufficient basis to deny public access to hearings or to the Court's files," Image Dynamics Inc. lawyer Alan M. Rifkin said in a separate letter to Baltimore Circuit Judge Thomas E. Noel.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1999
Baltimore-based Piper & Marbury LLP, the state's largest law firm, has completed its merger with Rudnick & Wolfe of Chicago to become one of the largest firms in the nation, the firms said yesterday.Partners in both cities voted unanimously Saturday to approve the merger creating Piper Marbury Rudnick & Wolfe, said Francis B. Burch Jr., a former chairman of Piper & Marbury who will be co-chairman of the merged firm along with Lee I. Miller, his counterpart at Rudnick & Wolfe.With more than 750 lawyers in eight cities, the new firm would have ranked 11th in size on the National Law Journal's list last year.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1999
The Yellow Pages is about to lose a full-page legal ad. Insurance company lawyers will have to reprogram their speed dials. And at least one well-known Baltimore advertising slogan is sure to become history.Stephen L. Miles and Saiontz & Kirk, two Baltimore-based law practices that spend millions on advertising to attract personal injury and other cases, will join forces sometime between Thursday and Monday, said Donald Saiontz, a partner at Saiontz & Kirk."The rationale is that in today's legal environment, you're better off if you can consolidate expenses and provide additional services," said Saiontz, who is waiting for the legal work on the deal to be completed.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1996
A deputy Maryland attorney general who played a lead role in high-profile cases, including the Jacqueline L. Bouknight case and a voter registration challenge stemming from the 1994 gubernatorial election, is leaving the post to join the Baltimore office of Hogan & Hartson.Ralph S. Tyler III, 48, who joined the attorney general's office in 1982, will work with the litigation practice group at Hogan & Hartson.He'll also work on state regulatory and in corporate and securities matters, among other things.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1999
The Yellow Pages is about to lose a full-page legal ad. Insurance company lawyers will have to reprogram their speed dials. And at least one well-known Baltimore advertising slogan is sure to become history.Stephen L. Miles and Saiontz & Kirk, two Baltimore-based law practices that spend millions on advertising to attract personal injury and other cases, will join forces sometime between Thursday and Monday, said Donald Saiontz, a partner at Saiontz & Kirk."The rationale is that in today's legal environment, you're better off if you can consolidate expenses and provide additional services," said Saiontz, who is waiting for the legal work on the deal to be completed.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A unanimous Supreme Court broadly expanded yesterday the power of federal judges to bar technical experts from spinning out unusual and controversial theories from the witness stand in defective product and accident cases.In a ruling echoing restrictions the court imposed six years ago on testimony based on what critics call "junk science," the court has taken the same approach against "junk engineering."Federal judges, the court said in a case widely watched by business interests, have the primary role as "gatekeepers" to control the admission or exclusion of testimony by any kind of expert -- whether their special field is science, engineering, or another technical area.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1999
Christopher D. Olander, managing partner of the Baltimore law firm of Shapiro and Olander, said yesterday that he will turn over day-to-day management of the firm to three senior partners and devote his time to a growing consulting practice.Olander said his corporate law practice, the firm's management and his business consulting practice had become too much to handle. "I saw the collision coming," he said.As a result, Olander, who has run the firm for 20 years, will relinquish control to senior partners Charles Fax, Joel Sher and William Carlson on Feb. 1. The move removes the 27-year-old firm's second founding partner from its management team.
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