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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 2, 2014
Jermin Laviera, an energetic woman with a bright and generous smile, works on the first floor of the Esperanza Center in Southeast Baltimore, which gives her a street-level perspective on the immigrant crisis emanating hundreds of miles away in Central America. Just about every day, undocumented immigrants — parents with children, children without parents — walk through Esperanza's front door on South Broadway. They all need help, and they all have stories — often ugly ones.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 2, 2014
Jermin Laviera, an energetic woman with a bright and generous smile, works on the first floor of the Esperanza Center in Southeast Baltimore, which gives her a street-level perspective on the immigrant crisis emanating hundreds of miles away in Central America. Just about every day, undocumented immigrants — parents with children, children without parents — walk through Esperanza's front door on South Broadway. They all need help, and they all have stories — often ugly ones.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | July 3, 2012
Free legal advice is being offered to low-income residents in Maryland through a partnership between the JustAdvice Initiative and Groupon Grassroots, the philanthropic arm of Groupon. Low income residents who attend JustAdvice sessions in Lexington Market will get access to legal advice and assistance. JustAdvice, run by Civil Justice Inc. and the University of Maryland School of Law,  has been offering low-cost legal consultations in areas such as family law, housing, employment and criminal matters since 2009 and is staffed by student attorneys and volunteer lawyers.
NEWS
By Michael Millemann | April 5, 2014
Studies document the extraordinary unmet legal needs of low and middle-income people. To appreciate this, visit Baltimore City's Rent Court, where hundreds of tenants, including families with children, face eviction and homelessness. Or watch a docket of debt-collection cases in district court, where many defendants face financial ruin; or custody cases in a circuit court, where distraught parents fight for their children. The overwhelming majority of these litigants are representing themselves, often against lawyers.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Shackled in a Baltimore courtroom and facing a 110-year sentence for murder and arson, Terrence Rollins-Bey stood defiant - talking over the judge and prosecutor in a series of outbursts. "With respect to your honor, I object to everything you're saying," he said. Rollins-Bey, 25, was the second murder defendant in a week to openly challenge the authority of Baltimore Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown. Rollins-Bey and Robert G. Moore claimed in separate trials the court lacked standing to hear their cases - a move the judge described as an attempt to frustrate the proceedings.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2002
Worried that they're getting biased legal advice, some Anne Arundel County Council members want a barrister of their own, someone other than County Attorney Linda M. Schuett. The elected officials contend that because Schuett, a 22-year law professional, was appointed by County Executive Janet S. Owens in 1999, she and her staff are more likely to write legal opinions that support legislation produced by the administration. "The problem is that, at times, there's concern that the county attorney is advocating for the county executive as opposed to giving detached legal advice," said Councilman John J. Klocko III, a Republican from Crofton.
FEATURES
By Henry Scarupa @ WAR IN THE GULF | February 20, 1991
Scholarship planIt's fine to fly the flag in support of U.S. troops in the gulf, buat least a few businesses and professionals are going a step further.Randy's Landscaping Inc., a family-run enterprise in the Dundalk area, has established a Shattered Families of the Persian Gulf scholarship fund to assist with the college education of children of Marylanders who are killed in the war. Selection of recipients will be made by Armed Forces representatives."We felt the need to help out in some way the children who might lose a mother or a father over there," says company president Randall E. McMonigle.
NEWS
November 27, 1995
IT'S NO SURPRISE THAT a consultant's review of the Carroll County attorney's office concluded that privatizing its operations would be a major financial mistake. The Institute of Governmental Services, a University of Maryland-affiliated research group, said the office should continue to function as it has and recommended no "substantive" changes in its daily operations.When then-candidate and now-commissioner W. Benjamin Brown suggested the county privatize its legal operations, there were immediate predictions that the county would end up spending considerably more for legal advice if it closed down its six-lawyer office and hired private attorneys to handle the county's legal work.
EXPLORE
July 21, 2011
WESTMINSTER - The Carroll Board of County Commissioners announced this month that Tim Burke has been appointed to the position of County Attorney. Burke has been serving in an acting capacity since April, following the resignation of Kimberly Millender. Burke was hired in 1996 as an assistant county attorney to provide legal advice to allied agencies, boards and commissions, and to represent the county in state and appellate courts. Burke received his bachelor's degree from the University of Scranton and his Juris Doctor from the University Of Pittsburgh School Of Law. He has been a practicing attorney for 23 years.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
When it comes to filing for bankruptcy, Marylanders are more likely to be do-it-yourselfers than debtors in other states. Maryland ranked ninth in the country a year ago in the number of bankruptcy cases in which the debtor wasn't represented by a lawyer, according to the administrative office for the U.S. Courts. Even some of these go-it-alone filers aren't completely without assistance, though. Many hire a bankruptcy petition preparer to fill out court documents. Preparers, who charge a fee, can't give legal advice, such as whether the debtor is better off filing for bankruptcy under Chapter 13 instead of Chapter 7. But there's increasing concern nationwide that petition preparers may be overstepping their bounds by giving legal advice — and not very good advice at that.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
The Baltimore City Council unanimously granted preliminary approval Monday to a proposal to hire an independent lawyer instead of relying on City Solicitor George Nilson for legal advice. Some council members say they believe Nilson, who reports to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, is loyal primarily to the mayor, and does not give the council's views the same weight in making decisions. The charter amendment legislation requires the council's attorney to be paid as much as a chief in the city law department, a position that currently pays $107,300 annually.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Shackled in a Baltimore courtroom and facing a 110-year sentence for murder and arson, Terrence Rollins-Bey stood defiant - talking over the judge and prosecutor in a series of outbursts. "With respect to your honor, I object to everything you're saying," he said. Rollins-Bey, 25, was the second murder defendant in a week to openly challenge the authority of Baltimore Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown. Rollins-Bey and Robert G. Moore claimed in separate trials the court lacked standing to hear their cases - a move the judge described as an attempt to frustrate the proceedings.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
A state lawyer determined there was nothing illegal about Maryland State Police deploying dozens of state workers from other agencies to help claw through a backlog of more than 35,000 background checks for gun buyers. In a Monday "letter of advice" to Allegany County Del. Kevin Kelly, who questioned the legality of the move, a lawyer from the Maryland attorney general's office, wrote that no law prevents state workers from doing clerical work for another agency and state police did not violate a law requiring Maryland State Police to review and investigate applications to buy guns.
NEWS
July 26, 2012
Francis X. Pugh Sr., who died suddenly last week, served Maryland as an assistant attorney general for nearly three decades. His principal role, like that of many of his colleagues, was to give legal advice to his state-agency clients - guidance that established the rules of the road by which state government functioned. Frank did his job with skill, creativity, integrity and sound judgment. He was a model and a mentor for our younger lawyers - and, I should add, for the three attorneys general he served under.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | July 3, 2012
Free legal advice is being offered to low-income residents in Maryland through a partnership between the JustAdvice Initiative and Groupon Grassroots, the philanthropic arm of Groupon. Low income residents who attend JustAdvice sessions in Lexington Market will get access to legal advice and assistance. JustAdvice, run by Civil Justice Inc. and the University of Maryland School of Law,  has been offering low-cost legal consultations in areas such as family law, housing, employment and criminal matters since 2009 and is staffed by student attorneys and volunteer lawyers.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
When it comes to filing for bankruptcy, Marylanders are more likely to be do-it-yourselfers than debtors in other states. Maryland ranked ninth in the country a year ago in the number of bankruptcy cases in which the debtor wasn't represented by a lawyer, according to the administrative office for the U.S. Courts. Even some of these go-it-alone filers aren't completely without assistance, though. Many hire a bankruptcy petition preparer to fill out court documents. Preparers, who charge a fee, can't give legal advice, such as whether the debtor is better off filing for bankruptcy under Chapter 13 instead of Chapter 7. But there's increasing concern nationwide that petition preparers may be overstepping their bounds by giving legal advice — and not very good advice at that.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2005
An Annapolis lawyer has converted part of his law office into a small legal resource center, aimed at the burgeoning number of consumers who are forgoing an attorney and handling their own legal matters. Street Legal sells self-help books on law as well as stocks Maryland court forms, and offers a work station and Internet access. The business provides information on the law and some resources but not legal advice. "If people want advice, that's different," said owner David A. Simison.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | November 21, 1999
Mission: Established in 1911, the Legal Aid Bureau is a nonprofit law firm that provides free civil legal services to low-income people statewide from 13 offices. The bureau serves clients who have problems that affect their basic survival, such as family dysfunction, denial of benefits for medical care, income maintenance or food stamps, and threat of eviction. Legal intervention can alleviate these problems or prevent them from escalating to homelessness, hunger, abuse, neglect and violence.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 27, 2011
  On Saturday - Oct. 29 th - Marylanders with legal problems can meet one-on-one with lawyers volunteering at a free legal clinic. The lawyers will deal with civil, not criminal issues. Topics that can be addressed: Divorce and child support, foreclosure, landlord and tenant disputes, bankruptcy, government benefits and wills and advance directives. The program runs 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Legal Aid, 500 E. Lexington St. in Baltimore. Consumers should bring relevant documents to the event.
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