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NEWS
August 5, 2013
It was extremely inspiring to read about Ann Miller's life and the selflessness she embodied for nearly 100 years (" Ann Miller, Md. Food Bank Founder," July 21). Ms. Miller was a trailblazer, serving in the Army Nurse Corps during World War II and achieving the rank of lieutenant. She identified challenges in her community and influenced the founding of programs that are still making a difference today. As the article pointed out, Ms. Miller founded the first food bank on the East Coast in 1979 and set a model that many states followed to help neighbors in need.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 13, 2014
It's often said and written that presidents, to achieve greatness, require great challenges. Washington had the challenge of creating a new nation; Lincoln had the Civil War; FDR faced the Great Depression and World War II. All clearly qualified by that standard and achieved greatness. By contrast consider Bill Clinton, who had two successful terms marred mostly by a personal scandal that brought him impeachment but acquittal. It has been noted that he encountered no major national crisis during his presidency, the resolution of which might have brought him greatness in history's annals.
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NEWS
July 23, 2013
Helen Thomas may have been a pioneer for women attending press conferences at the White House, but she also had faults that should not be overlooked ("Pioneering journalist broke D.C. glass ceiling," July 21). She was abrasive, arrogant, rude and repetitive in her questioning, leaving a number of presidents, press secretaries and foreign dignitaries, including Margaret Thatcher, disturbed by her tactics. She never failed to show her anti-Israel bias at the White House news conferences, where she always launched into a tirade against Israel that bordered on anti-Semitism before her questioning began.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | October 12, 2014
"[O]ne man appears to be a more eligible dispenser of the mercy of government, than a body of men. " - Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 74 Every politician wants a legacy - an issue or institution that evolves far beyond the official's time in public office. Sometimes, unexpected events intervene and the intended legacy items do not go according to plan. My experience is a good example of such an unplanned legacy. Some of you will recall our administration's steadfast support for charter schools - public schools that enjoy a greater degree of autonomy than the standard public school.
NEWS
January 30, 2014
The world has lost a great and wise man with the death of Pete Seeger ( "Folk legend, activist Pete Seeger dead at 94," Jan. 28). One of the primary lessons he tried to teach us was one of inclusiveness. It was impossible to attend a Pete Seeger concert and not feel invited to join in and to participate by singing along with him. His slight modification to an old African-American spiritual was to change the words from "I shall overcome," to "We shall overcome. " That slight inclusive change altered the course of our nation.
NEWS
May 2, 2013
Fred Lazarus has made many great contributions to Baltimore, but perhaps one of his lesser known and appreciated ones is raising the bar for high quality architectural design, as represented by the Brown Center and the Gateway student dorm building on the Maryland Institute College of Art campus ("MICA's Fred Lazarus to retire in 2014 after guiding art school for 35 years," April 30). Those buildings serve as inspirations for the rest of Baltimore. Excellent design is a vital element for raising the spirits of residents, workers and visitors alike.
NEWS
March 16, 2010
Your editorial, "Unfinished business" (March 10) about Deputy Mayor Andy Frank's departure from City Hall stated that his legacy will be his efforts to bring slots to Baltimore, and if successful at some point in the future, to reduce the property tax rate in Baltimore City. In fact, the legacy of Mr. Frank and the Dixon Administration are the massive public subsidies the city provided to a few politically connected developers for the Harbor East and Westport Developments. Regrettably, those investments came at the expense of city taxpayers and the existing businesses and growing number of residents downtown.
NEWS
November 9, 2012
The "Making presidential elections fairer" commentary (Nov. 17) omits that the Electoral College is another legacy of slavery. The compromise of 1787, the counting of slaves as three-fifths of a person in determining the number of representatives in Congress to which a state was entitled (plus two senators), was the same formula used to construct the number of electors each state had in the Electoral College. Joseph R. Cowen, Baltimore
NEWS
March 8, 2012
Isn't the governor supposed to represent the views of the constituents who elected him to office? The governor is opposed to the death penalty, so no murderers have been executed. Does that represent the wishes of the majority of Marylanders? The governor is for in-state tuition for illegals, which the majority of Marylanders are against. UnderMartin O'Malley's administration, we have seen increases in our taxes, tolls and fees. Now this man wants to add more to the already-high cost of gasoline.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Thank you to Dan Rodricks for the article about Bernie Weisman and Charlesmead Pharmacy ("Bernie Weisman, the man who never had a bad day in 65 years," Jan. 13). I smiled as I read the article - I had a warm heart and had tears in my eyes too. He was exactly as you said he was, a lovely, caring, giving man. His wife, Marilyn, is an amazing woman, working at the pharmacy, continuing the kindness - the legacy of Bernie. I love being a customer. The entire staff reflects who and what kind of man Bernie was; he created and ran a "one of a kind" old time pharmacy, soda fountain and all. I have missed him, those twinkling eyes and that wonderful smile, his caring.
NEWS
October 2, 2014
Eric H. Holder has indeed left behind an impressive legacy ( "The Holder legacy Sept. 28). As the nation's top law-enforcement officer he has refused to follow or enforce the law. Here is his legacy: He allowed the IRS to target conservative groups and ignore congressional subpoenas, then stood by when the agency "lost" emails by Lois Lerner and others to thwart the investigation. He allowed the State Department and the executive branch to ignore subpoenas in the Benghazi investigation and disallowed the interviewing of witnesses by Congress.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - Mark Turgeon's two distinct memories of Len Bias have lasted three decades. The first occurred when Turgeon was a sophomore point guard at Kansas, sharing the same court at the Greak Alaskan Shootout with a junior rising star from Maryland. "Dunked on him," the Terps coach joked this week. In reality, Turgeon recalled how the muscular, 6-foot-8 power forward scraped his head on the bottom of the backboard after going in for a dunk. "That was the first time I had seen that," Turgeon said.
NEWS
September 28, 2014
Of all the offices in the federal government, the job of attorney general may be one of the toughest as well the most thankless. Eric H. Holder, who announced last week that he is stepping down as the nation's top law enforcement official six years after becoming the first African-American ever to hold that position, was no stranger to the controversy that comes with the job nor to the endless stream of criticism directed at its occupants. His tenure was not perfect - the failure to crack down sufficiently on the financial speculators who brought our economy to ruin being perhaps the greatest shortcoming.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 15, 2014
The strategy President Barack Obama has laid out to "degrade and ultimately destroy" the new Middle East terrorist peril reveals him as a man divided between combating the immediate threat and persevering in his determination get this country off "a perpetual war footing. " In clinging to his insistence that there will be no more American "boots on the ground," he is committing himself and the nation to a military compromise that adheres more to public preference than to the comprehensive approach dictated by the Pentagon.
NEWS
By Martin O'Malley | September 11, 2014
Two-hundred years ago, a Maryland-born lawyer watched as British forces bombarded Fort McHenry at the Battle of Baltimore. At dawn, against all odds, the massive star-spangled banner flew over the fort, signaling America's triumphant defense of Baltimore. As the flag waved, Francis Scott Key penned the words that would become our National Anthem. This week, as we celebrate the bicentennial anniversary of the defense of Fort McHenry and our National Anthem, we celebrate more than Maryland's special sacrifice in the defense of American independence that September dawn.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Francis Scott Key is so closely identified with Fort McHenry that the South Baltimore landmark is considered the go-to place to learn how the 15-starred American flag that flew after the fort's bombardment 200 years ago inspired him to write the poem that became the national anthem. But those wishing to pay their final respects to the lawyer-turned-poet could also head 50 miles west to Frederick, where Key is buried in a sprawling cemetery that runs along U.S. 40 where it shares the roadway with busy Interstate 70. "Key always wanted to be buried in the shadow of the Catoctin Mountains," said Ron Pearcey, the superintendent of Mount Olivet Cemetery.
NEWS
January 26, 2011
I just finished reading Paul Lewis' tongue-in-cheek letter to the editor of The Sun ( "Maybe the Toaster finally figured out where Poe was born," Jan. 23), in which he comments on Edgar Allan Poe's mysterious toaster presumably resurfacing in Boston. I at first took umbrage at the tone of the letter, taking Mr. Lewis' comment "...when Poe died there during what was supposed to be a brief stopover... " as an insult to Baltimore, implying that Baltimore has little, if any, claim to Poe's legacy.
NEWS
July 3, 2014
In 1988, Ronald Reagan was president and Kurt L. Schmoke was mayor of Baltimore. Mayor Schmoke had a vision for Baltimore as "The City that Reads," and from that vision Baltimore Reads was born ( "Funding woes close Baltimore Reads," May 2). Over its 26 year history, Baltimore Reads engaged in a number of literacy services for the city including providing a book bank for families and schools and offering classes for youth and adults. In the last several years, Baltimore Reads has given away hundreds of thousands of books and helped thousands of Baltimore Residents learn to read, speak English and earn their high school diplomas by passing the GED exam.
NEWS
By Javier Miyares | June 22, 2014
Seventy years ago today, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a bill that transformed the economic and social structure of the United States and paved the way for the post-war boom. It was called the GI Bill of Rights. One of its many unintended byproducts was the way it revolutionized higher education. Just 16 days after D-Day, as American troops began the torturous battle to retake Hitler's Europe, President Roosevelt said in his signing statement that the bill "gives emphatic notice to the men and women in our armed forces that the American people do not intend to let them down.
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