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NEWS
March 9, 2007
On March 5, 2007, DR. ALLAN THEODORE "Ted" LEFFLER, II, of Ellicott City, MD, beloved husband of Melissa "Missy" Leffler, devoted father of Katherine Brown, Christopher Leffler, Maggie Martin, Dan and Sarah Carpenter. Dr. Leffler is also survived by his loving mother Josephine Leffler, his sister Mary Hilliard, two brothers; Harry and Tom Leffler and eight grandchildren. The family will receive friends on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 P.M., at the Church of The Resurrection Chapel,(Cardinal Sheehan Pastoral Center)
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
As the Baltimore Colts were leaving the city in early 1984, the team's director of sales recalled sitting at the Rusty Scupper bar at the Inner Harbor, wondering what he should do next. A friend told Bob Leffler he should start his own advertising agency. After about three months, he had one employee and his first clients, including a moving company. By late summer, he landed his first big ad contract, with Laurel Race Course, and moved into a North Charles Street office. This month, the Leffler Agency turned 30. It has become the ad agency for numerous sports-related clients, including athletic programs for colleges such as the Naval Academy, Towson University, George Mason University and the University of Delaware.
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BUSINESS
By SUN STAFF | March 21, 1998
The Leffler Agency Inc., a Baltimore advertising and marketing firm, has won the $1.2 million account for AmeriLife, described as America's largest senior life insurance company.The television advertising campaign for the Clearwater,Fla.-based company, rolled out this week in markets in Florida, Virginia and North Carolina. Using direct-response, the campaign focuses on the Ameri-Plus benefit program through which seniors receive a coupon book of discounts on items including prescriptions, airline tickets and groceries.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,special to the sun | September 16, 2007
Holly Campbell is a young doctor with a problem. Shaken by her mother's death, Holly quits her job, leaves her boyfriend and finds herself living in England, unsure of what to do next. Dr. Campbell is the fictional counterpart of real-life doctor and novelist Maggie Leffler, who grew up in Columbia. In her first book, Diagnosis of Love, Leffler follows Holly's adventures in medicine and love. Unlike her main character, Leffler has always known what she wanted to do with her life -- become a doctor and a writer.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | December 22, 1995
HOLIDAY parties have occupied every nook and cranny of hotels and restaurants during the past few weeks. One of the most popular of these office parties was the Leffler Agency's 12th annual bash held at the City Lights restaurant.Leffler is Bob Leffler, who once had the incredible job of trying to handle public relations for Bob Irsay and the Baltimore Colts. Soon after Irsay left town in the middle of the night, Leffler opened an agency with an emphasis on sports.And because of all the ties he has in pro football, the traditional crowd of media and marketing types showed up to see if any of the Baltimore Browns' inner circle would show.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,special to the sun | September 16, 2007
Holly Campbell is a young doctor with a problem. Shaken by her mother's death, Holly quits her job, leaves her boyfriend and finds herself living in England, unsure of what to do next. Dr. Campbell is the fictional counterpart of real-life doctor and novelist Maggie Leffler, who grew up in Columbia. In her first book, Diagnosis of Love, Leffler follows Holly's adventures in medicine and love. Unlike her main character, Leffler has always known what she wanted to do with her life -- become a doctor and a writer.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1999
The Leffler Agency Inc., a Baltimore advertising and public relations-marketing company, has landed a $3.5 million advertising account with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, the agency's first major league baseball win.The firm's client roster already includes four NFL teams: the Baltimore Ravens, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Cincinnati Bengals and Denver Broncos."
BUSINESS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2004
Bob Leffler started his career in marketing working for the most hated man in Baltimore. Today, more than 20 years later, he has moved on to working for the most hated man in England. As Tampa Bay Buccaneers owner Malcolm Glazer continues his quest to gain controlling interest in the most well-known soccer team in the world - England's Manchester United - he has again called on Leffler's marketing firm in Baltimore to run interference. "They know me, they know what I can do," Leffler said of the 12-year relationship that began with Glazer's attempt to obtain an NFL expansion team for Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1999
It was during the third quarter of a football game in 1983 that Bob Leffler decided what he wanted to do with the rest of his life.He had just seen the Baltimore Colts defense run Denver Broncos quarterback John Elway out of that steamy September game. But Leffler had also seen an amazing unity among the Baltimore fans, still seething from Elway's earlier proclamation that he would not come play here -- a move that local fans interpreted as a slam against the city."It was a galvanizing day," recalled Leffler, founder and president of the Leffler Agency Inc., a Baltimore-based advertising and public relations/marketing agency.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Sun reporter | March 7, 2007
The staff at Howard County General Hospital would not have been surprised to see pediatrician Ted Leffler checking on a newborn patient Monday night. Colleagues called Dr. Allan Theodore Leffler II, a fixture at several area hospitals over three decades, as a tireless and hands-on advocate for his patients, even when they were in the care of a specialist or hospital staff. But the 66-year-old Ellicott City physician did not reach the hospital Monday night. Howard County police said a Ford Taurus driven by Christopher C. McCullough -- who had turned 21 that day -- crossed the median of Route 103 just west of Chatsworth Way, struck Dr. Leffler's Volkswagen Passat and killed both drivers on impact.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | March 14, 2007
CLARIFICATION An article in the Maryland section Wednesday about a fatal Howard County automobile accident failed to make it clear that under Maryland law a motorist with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 percent or higher is considered to be driving while intoxicated (DWI), and a motorist with a blood alcohol concentration between 0.04 percent and 0.08 percent is considered to be driving under the influence (DUI).
NEWS
March 9, 2007
On March 5, 2007, DR. ALLAN THEODORE "Ted" LEFFLER, II, of Ellicott City, MD, beloved husband of Melissa "Missy" Leffler, devoted father of Katherine Brown, Christopher Leffler, Maggie Martin, Dan and Sarah Carpenter. Dr. Leffler is also survived by his loving mother Josephine Leffler, his sister Mary Hilliard, two brothers; Harry and Tom Leffler and eight grandchildren. The family will receive friends on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 P.M., at the Church of The Resurrection Chapel,(Cardinal Sheehan Pastoral Center)
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Sun reporter | March 7, 2007
The staff at Howard County General Hospital would not have been surprised to see pediatrician Ted Leffler checking on a newborn patient Monday night. Colleagues called Dr. Allan Theodore Leffler II, a fixture at several area hospitals over three decades, as a tireless and hands-on advocate for his patients, even when they were in the care of a specialist or hospital staff. But the 66-year-old Ellicott City physician did not reach the hospital Monday night. Howard County police said a Ford Taurus driven by Christopher C. McCullough -- who had turned 21 that day -- crossed the median of Route 103 just west of Chatsworth Way, struck Dr. Leffler's Volkswagen Passat and killed both drivers on impact.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | December 17, 2005
What does it say about Baltimore as a football town that around 15,000 seats weren't filled when the Ravens played the Houston Texans earlier this month? It doesn't say nice things, that's for sure. And what does it say that the scene likely will be repeated to some degree as the Ravens close out their home schedule against the Green Bay Packers on Monday night and the Minnesota Vikings on Christmas night? Again, whatever it says, it's not a compliment. Baltimore's bona fides as a football town would seem to be beyond reproach - the Colts once sold out 51 games in a row, and the Ravens have sold every ticket for every game since moving from Cleveland a decade ago. Even when the Orioles were at their best in the late 1960s, the Colts easily outdrew them.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2005
The toughest ticket in sports? The Atlantic Coast Conference hasn't had a public sale of tickets for its men's basketball tournament since 1966. The Masters tournament, held every April at Augusta National Golf Club, has been sold out since 1972. The waiting list for tickets is closed, too. The Super Bowl is a scalper's delight, especially in a year like this, when two East Coast teams met in a game that was played in Jacksonville, Fla. Bob Leffler, the Baltimore-based advertising executive, represents NFL teams, college athletic programs and the Maryland Jockey Club, among other clients.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2004
More than 190 years after they attempted an attack on Baltimore, the British - at least some of them - are planning a figurative one. Spurred by a comment made by advertising executive Bob Leffler in Tuesday's editions of The Sun, some supporters of Manchester United are planning to protest Tampa Bay Buccaneers owner Malcolm Glazer's attempt to buy controlling interest in the most famous soccer team in the world at Leffler's annual Christmas party this...
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1998
Professional hockey has been a tough sell in Baltimore over the years, but one local sports entrepreneur says he believes the right combination of money and marketing could make it finally succeed here.Robert Leffler, owner of the Leffler Agency, confirmed this week that he has filed a letter of interest with the International Hockey League. Leffler, whose ad agency counts a number of sports teams among its clients, said he received an inquiry from a potential investor and followed up with the league to get information on costs and structure.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2005
The toughest ticket in sports? The Atlantic Coast Conference hasn't had a public sale of tickets for its men's basketball tournament since 1966. The Masters tournament, held every April at Augusta National Golf Club, has been sold out since 1972. The waiting list for tickets is closed, too. The Super Bowl is a scalper's delight, especially in a year like this, when two East Coast teams met in a game that was played in Jacksonville, Fla. Bob Leffler, the Baltimore-based advertising executive, represents NFL teams, college athletic programs and the Maryland Jockey Club, among other clients.
BUSINESS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2004
Bob Leffler started his career in marketing working for the most hated man in Baltimore. Today, more than 20 years later, he has moved on to working for the most hated man in England. As Tampa Bay Buccaneers owner Malcolm Glazer continues his quest to gain controlling interest in the most well-known soccer team in the world - England's Manchester United - he has again called on Leffler's marketing firm in Baltimore to run interference. "They know me, they know what I can do," Leffler said of the 12-year relationship that began with Glazer's attempt to obtain an NFL expansion team for Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2001
When Bob Leffler won the Tampa Bay Buccaneers advertising account in 1995, he sought bilingual help on the rare occasions when he needed to run football ads in La Gaceta, the area's major Spanish language newspaper. A few years later, when the Tampa Bay Devil Rays joined the Baltimore ad man's client roster, he'd grab nearly anyone he could find who spoke both Spanish and English to translate the radio commercials. "Say it in Spanish," Leffler would tell them. "I've got a lot of tickets to sell.
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