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By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2011
Marc Miller survived a motorcycle crash in October near his Baltimore County home, but his foot had been dragged along the pavement and badly damaged. That injury would require both the most advanced medicine and an ancient therapy — leeches. Trauma doctors at Johns Hopkins, the University of Maryland and other U.S. hospitals routinely use leeches as a temporary measure to keep blood flowing as new vessels grow in a damaged area. The animals kept blood moving in and out of a new skin flap sewn onto Miller's foot.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Each week, The Baltimore Sun will publish a Q&A with a college lacrosse player to get you better acquainted with the player and his or her team. Today's guest is Towson senior Katie Leech, who has emerged as a top matchup defender since switching from midfield two years ago. The Winters Mill graduate scored 81 goals in leading the Falcons to a state title as a senior, but she enjoys the challenge of playing defense for the No. 14 Tigers (2-0),...
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NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF Sun staff writer Jonathan Bor contributed to this article | November 12, 1997
RODNIKI, Russia -- Gennady I. Nikonov beams with fatherlike pride as he surveys his progeny. Some are mating in a quiet room, others are getting their first real meal (not a pretty sight); soon-to-be mothers are swollen with pregnancy.He watches happily as a young woman plunges her arm into a 10-quart glass jar and plucks a handful of tiny but already fat, squirming leeches from their cocoons. "This is the most tender moment," he sighs.Another generation of leeches has just been born, and Gennady Nikonov thinks they should suck your blood.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2011
Marc Miller survived a motorcycle crash in October near his Baltimore County home, but his foot had been dragged along the pavement and badly damaged. That injury would require both the most advanced medicine and an ancient therapy — leeches. Trauma doctors at Johns Hopkins, the University of Maryland and other U.S. hospitals routinely use leeches as a temporary measure to keep blood flowing as new vessels grow in a damaged area. The animals kept blood moving in and out of a new skin flap sewn onto Miller's foot.
NEWS
By ALBANY TIMES UNION | March 6, 1997
ALBANY, N.Y. - They called it "the black medicine," but 6-year-old Jaimie Martineau wasn't completely fooled."That's gross," she recalls saying when doctors first placed the slimy, blood-sucking worm atop her right ring finger. She looked the other way.A dozen leeches gorged themselves until they grew fat as cigars and fell off her hand. They were doing what modern medicine could not - blocking a blood clot and keeping Martineau's tender finger alive.It was the third time surgeons at Albany Medical Center Hospital chose to combine modern, high-tech microsurgery and the centuries-old use of medicinal leeches to save a sliced-off finger.
NEWS
By Alfred Lubrano and Alfred Lubrano,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 5, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Bloodsucking leeches have been feasting on humans with greedy abandon, turning hospital wards into corpuscle cafeterias. Back in the old days, leeches were the tool of choice among medieval barbers who called themselves doctors and believed that draining people of a little blood was a cure for various ailments. Today, medicinal leeches are being used with greater frequency by physicians who reattach severed fingers, ears, lips and other body parts. "Ten years ago, doctors weren't using them much at all," said Gerald Meyer, assistant director of pharmacy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, and keeper of the leeches.
NEWS
August 29, 2005
ADVISERS AT the Food and Drug Administration took time out last week to determine how best to regulate leeches and maggots for use on ailing humans. Turns out these creepy-crawlies are accounted as medical devices; the question is how stringent a review their "manufacturers" will have to undergo before they may bring them to market. Why "devices"? Because they chew, which is a mechanical process, says the FDA. One could call them the oldest bits of biotechnology. Certainly the squirmiest.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | November 25, 2001
A MEMORABLE PLACE A great trek, leeches and all By Heidi Nevin SPECIAL TO THE SUN I have been living in Nepal and India learning Tibetan Buddhism for the last five years. This summer, my little sister, Liv, came to visit me in the Katmandu Valley. She is a beautiful, athletic, ambitious young woman from California; the transition from the stimulating pace of Berkeley to the utter calm of that Nepali village was not easy. She was ready for an adventure. Two days after Liv arrived, the royal family of Nepal was murdered in their palace, and the nation lay silent in a state of stunned despair.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 9, 1999
PANCEVO, Yugoslavia -- Dragomir Djuric says he has been fishing the Tamis river for 48 years, pulling fat catfish out of its depths using live black leeches as bait.Unless they are eaten, he says, the leeches usually stay on the hook for five days.In recent weeks, he says, something in the water has changed. The leeches die in a day, and are white when pulled out, looking as if they had been "boiled."The fish, he says, are different, too -- sluggish and sickly, with protruding bones and bulging eyes.
TRAVEL
January 23, 2000
MY FAVORITE PLACE Trekking on sacred trails By Judy Cook SPECIAL TO THE SUN At 28,208 feet, Kanchenjunga is the third-highest mountain on Earth, surpassed only by Everest at 29,028 feet and K2 at 28,250 feet. Our plan was not to climb this Himalayan mountain, but rather to view its north face from a base camp at Pangpema (17,127 feet) and then cross the Mirgin La (14,982 feet) to explore the towering southern face of Kanchenjunga. This is why, a month before my 50th birthday, my husband, David, and I traveled to Katmandu with two large duffel bags packed with camping and trekking gear.
NEWS
December 15, 2008
On December 13, 2008, MARILYN S. LEECH, beloved wife of the late Andrew J. Leech, Sr., devoted mother of Andrea Nusinov and husband Keith and the late Andrew Leech, Jr. Survived by six grandchildren, Thomas, Mindy, Michael, Stephanie, Andrew, Felicia and Phillip and seven great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the Henry W. Jenkins and Sons Funeral Home, 16924 York Rd (Hereford/Monkton) on Tuesday from 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be held at Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 18310 Middletown Rd, Parkton on Wednesday at 10 A.M. Interment following at Gardens of Faith Cemetery.
NEWS
August 29, 2005
ADVISERS AT the Food and Drug Administration took time out last week to determine how best to regulate leeches and maggots for use on ailing humans. Turns out these creepy-crawlies are accounted as medical devices; the question is how stringent a review their "manufacturers" will have to undergo before they may bring them to market. Why "devices"? Because they chew, which is a mechanical process, says the FDA. One could call them the oldest bits of biotechnology. Certainly the squirmiest.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2005
Brian Berghuis will likely still have to take out the trash at home, but he has earned his star at Baltimore's T. Rowe Price Group Inc. by being named the best of thousands of individuals throughout the country who manage money in domestic mutual funds. Berghuis, manager of the T. Rowe Price Mid-Cap Growth Fund, was named domestic mutual fund manager of the year yesterday by Morningstar Inc., the Chicago firm that tracks the industry. Morningstar also honored Legg Mason's S. Kenneth Leech, chief investment officer of Western Asset Management Co., and other members of his fixed-income fund management team.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | November 25, 2001
A MEMORABLE PLACE A great trek, leeches and all By Heidi Nevin SPECIAL TO THE SUN I have been living in Nepal and India learning Tibetan Buddhism for the last five years. This summer, my little sister, Liv, came to visit me in the Katmandu Valley. She is a beautiful, athletic, ambitious young woman from California; the transition from the stimulating pace of Berkeley to the utter calm of that Nepali village was not easy. She was ready for an adventure. Two days after Liv arrived, the royal family of Nepal was murdered in their palace, and the nation lay silent in a state of stunned despair.
NEWS
By Alfred Lubrano and Alfred Lubrano,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 5, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Bloodsucking leeches have been feasting on humans with greedy abandon, turning hospital wards into corpuscle cafeterias. Back in the old days, leeches were the tool of choice among medieval barbers who called themselves doctors and believed that draining people of a little blood was a cure for various ailments. Today, medicinal leeches are being used with greater frequency by physicians who reattach severed fingers, ears, lips and other body parts. "Ten years ago, doctors weren't using them much at all," said Gerald Meyer, assistant director of pharmacy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, and keeper of the leeches.
TRAVEL
January 23, 2000
MY FAVORITE PLACE Trekking on sacred trails By Judy Cook SPECIAL TO THE SUN At 28,208 feet, Kanchenjunga is the third-highest mountain on Earth, surpassed only by Everest at 29,028 feet and K2 at 28,250 feet. Our plan was not to climb this Himalayan mountain, but rather to view its north face from a base camp at Pangpema (17,127 feet) and then cross the Mirgin La (14,982 feet) to explore the towering southern face of Kanchenjunga. This is why, a month before my 50th birthday, my husband, David, and I traveled to Katmandu with two large duffel bags packed with camping and trekking gear.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | August 7, 1994
West Ocean City--Six-year-old Paul Murphy is ready for this day: He's strapped on his gun and been sworn in as a deputy."He's been here before, so he's ready for the bad guys today!" says his mother, Sherry Murphy of Frederick, with an affectionate smile, watching her son and about 45 other children line up for the pony ride that follows swearing-in at Frontier Town.The western theme park, opened in 1959, is a miniature town that occupies 38 acres in West Ocean City and includes an amusement complex with water slides, a golf course and a campground.
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | September 22, 1993
Washington. -- Soothed by frequent reports of wondrous progress in medicine, Americans must face up to a little-discussed challenge if health-care reform is to succeed: They're going to have to moderate their faith in medical wizardry. Otherwise, it will be impossible to hold down the costs that threaten to break the national bank, even while millions of people are priced out of the medical market.Though contemporary medical practice claims to be imbued with the prove-it spirit of science, the fact is that many widely used health-care techniques have never been subjected to independent, objective analysis to determine their value for patients.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 9, 1999
PANCEVO, Yugoslavia -- Dragomir Djuric says he has been fishing the Tamis river for 48 years, pulling fat catfish out of its depths using live black leeches as bait.Unless they are eaten, he says, the leeches usually stay on the hook for five days.In recent weeks, he says, something in the water has changed. The leeches die in a day, and are white when pulled out, looking as if they had been "boiled."The fish, he says, are different, too -- sluggish and sickly, with protruding bones and bulging eyes.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF Sun staff writer Jonathan Bor contributed to this article | November 12, 1997
RODNIKI, Russia -- Gennady I. Nikonov beams with fatherlike pride as he surveys his progeny. Some are mating in a quiet room, others are getting their first real meal (not a pretty sight); soon-to-be mothers are swollen with pregnancy.He watches happily as a young woman plunges her arm into a 10-quart glass jar and plucks a handful of tiny but already fat, squirming leeches from their cocoons. "This is the most tender moment," he sighs.Another generation of leeches has just been born, and Gennady Nikonov thinks they should suck your blood.
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