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By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | May 16, 2004
Dani Mazzilli is talking on the phone and the melodic b-l-i-i-n-n-g-g in the background betrays the fact that she is also online, instant-messaging someone else. Suddenly, her cell phone rings, adding to the chorus, and she interrupts two conversations to begin a third with one of her three teen-aged children. Yes, she will bring the equipment bag to school that the child left at home that morning. She will be at school anyway, she says, working on the '70s dance. "Now where were we?"
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,Sun Reporter | June 20, 2007
SAN DIEGO -- Brian Roberts endured it with the firing of Mike Hargrove, then Lee Mazzilli and now Sam Perlozzo, three managers he liked and respected. So when he was approached by a small group of reporters in the visiting clubhouse at Petco Park and asked about Perlozzo, he quickly grew agitated. "I've seen managers come and go here," said Roberts, who has been with the Orioles for parts of the past seven seasons. "To tell you the truth, I just want to come here and play baseball. That's all. I am tired of dealing with the manager situation.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2005
POWER SURGE FOR ORIOLES RUNS SCORED - 125 1ST IN AL STOLEN BASES - 22 2ND IN AL HOME RUNS - 29 2ND IN AL BATTING AVERAGE - .303 1ST IN AL TOTAL BASES - 369 1ST IN AL SLUGGING PCT. - .489 1ST IN AL BOSTON - His team had been shut out for 21 straight innings, and as he sat in the visiting dugout Friday before the series opener in Toronto, Orioles manager Lee Mazzilli was fielding the obvious questions. But no matter how many times he was asked, no matter how many reminders he was given of those two zeros his offense put up in losses at home against the Boston Red Sox last week, Mazzilli refused to express even the slightest bit of concern.
SPORTS
June 19, 2007
Changes in command under owner Peter Angelos: On Sam Perlozzo 2005-2007 Hire: "There's an old expression - `rough seas make a great sea cap' - and I think we got to see the best of Sam in a very difficult time [as interim manager]. I was very impressed the way he handled the club." - Executive vice president Mike Flanagan, Oct. 12, 2005 Departure: "We felt Sam was prepared. We felt the club was prepared to do battle every night. For whatever reason, it just wasn't working." - Flanagan, yesterday On Lee Mazzilli 2004-2005 Hire: "They [Flanagan and Jim Beattie]
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2004
It's midseason, and the Orioles have a manager on the hot seat again. Lee Mazzilli has been at the helm for 85 games, and already there is mounting speculation he won't last the season. Limited by injuries and their pitchers' inconsistency, the Orioles lost 25 of their final 38 games before the All-Star break, including two of three against the woeful Kansas City Royals last weekend, to fall into last place in the American League East. At 37-48, they entered the break with their worst record since 1999.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2004
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Want to make Lee Mazzilli's blood pressure rise? Tell him the word is, the Orioles are going to meet a real players' manager today, when he officially takes over the reins as pitchers and catchers report to spring training. "What's a players' manager?" Mazzilli said, somewhat defensively, last week. The questioner hemmed and hawed. By definition, a players' manager is someone who can relate well to the modern player, often a former player himself, who ... "Yeah," Mazzilli interjected, "but most managers are former players."
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2004
Day 1 It's April 20, 2 1/2 hours before game time, and Lee Mazzilli, 49, comes out of his office and into the dugout. Former manager Mike Hargrove let reporters into his inner-sanctum for pre-game press conferences. Not Mazzilli. He's in control. A Yankee thing, control. He looks like a tough guy. Intense. Confident. Big brawny face, high cheek bones, stares you straight in the eye. The beat reporters complain about his short, cliche-laden sentences. But at least he's talking. When you're a Yankee, you don't have to. But this is the Orioles.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | August 5, 2006
It was exactly one year ago today that Lee Mazzilli was fired as Orioles manager. "It doesn't seem that long," he said. He's not sorry to be gone. Trust me. I couldn't get Sidney Ponson's attention before the pre-game stretch, and I'm not sure he would have talked to me anyway. A New York television reporter asked Ponson if he had any special feelings being back in Baltimore. "None. Zero," he said. "I'm just happy to be on a winning team." roch.kubatko@baltsun.com For more "Roch Around the Clock," go to baltimoresun.
SPORTS
August 5, 2005
"I and everyone with the Orioles wish Johnny the best. He leaves with our gratitude, goodwill and respect." Johnny Oates In: May 23, 1991 (under owner Eli Jacobs) Out: Sept. 26, 1994 Won-lost: 291-270 Winning percentage: .519 "The Orioles will continue to hold Phil in high personal and professional esteem." Phil Regan In: Oct. 16, 1994 Out: Oct. 20, 1995 Won-lost: 71-73 Winning percentage: . 493 "This chapter is over, I wish him well." Davey Johnson In: Oct. 30, 1995 Out: Nov. 5, 1997 Won-lost: 186-138 Winning percentage: .574 "Ray Miller is a gentleman and a fine baseball man. ... My best wishes go out to him in his future endeavors."
SPORTS
July 2, 2005
O's Mazzilli has flaws, but he should return The Orioles' silence on Lee Mazzilli's contract extension is an obvious message to him: Win the division or you are gone. It's that simple. However, I think he deserves at least another year, winning the division or not. Whether the Orioles' success so far has to do with Mazzilli or the clubhouse and field leadership of Miguel Tejada is another question for a later time. My only problem with Mazzilli's managerial style is that he has a tendency to leave pitchers in one batter too long.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | August 5, 2006
It was exactly one year ago today that Lee Mazzilli was fired as Orioles manager. "It doesn't seem that long," he said. He's not sorry to be gone. Trust me. I couldn't get Sidney Ponson's attention before the pre-game stretch, and I'm not sure he would have talked to me anyway. A New York television reporter asked Ponson if he had any special feelings being back in Baltimore. "None. Zero," he said. "I'm just happy to be on a winning team." roch.kubatko@baltsun.com For more "Roch Around the Clock," go to baltimoresun.
SPORTS
By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2006
NEW YORK -- Lee Mazzilli and Mike Flanagan have spoken several times since Aug. 3, the day Mazzilli was told that he was relieved of his duties as Orioles manager. They have talked about baseball, about their families and about common past experiences. But there is one topic that has never - and Mazzilli says won't - come up in their conversations. "I still haven't asked him [why I was fired]," Mazzilli said Friday. "I haven't asked my friend that. There is no reason to. Why? I don't want to put anyone in that position.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | September 29, 2005
As the Orioles near the end of the most tumultuous season in their storied history, club major- ity owner Peter G. Angelos said he is looking to the future while contemplating how a promising season unraveled so completely. "It was very disappointing obviously and, in many senses a calamity of problems that were totally unexpected," Angelos said yesterday while publicly assessing the season for the first time. Angelos declined to call 2005 - which included 62 days in first place, a steroids controversy involving star first baseman Rafael Palmeiro, the drunken-driving charges against projected team ace Sidney Ponson and the firing of manager Lee Mazzilli - the franchise's worst season.
NEWS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2005
ANAHEIM, Calif. - Unable to halt a recent stretch of losses that lowered his team to fourth place, Lee Mazzilli was fired as Orioles manager yesterday, in the middle of his second season. Bench coach Sam Perlozzo takes over as interim manager. "You're heartbroken a little bit because you want to see it through. You come in with an objective and you want to achieve that, but this goes with the territory," Mazzilli, 50, said in a phone interview before boarding a flight to Baltimore. "I told my wife, and she just talked about how great people treated her in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | August 5, 2005
ANAHEIM, Calif. - Lee Mazzilli could have gone down swinging. He could have kicked and screamed and aired the dirty laundry of an organization that has been so soiled this week that one more sad story probably wouldn't have made any difference anyway. He didn't do that, choosing to take the high road as he headed down the highway toward Los Angeles International Airport yesterday morning. "You're heartbroken a little bit," he said by cell phone, "because you want to see it through." See what through ... a season so disjointed that Sidney Ponson's Christmas bash now looks like comic relief next to the events of the past week?
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | August 5, 2005
LEE MAZZILLI isn't a bad guy. History may show he's not a bad manager. But Mazzilli was a bad fit in Baltimore. That's the bottom line, and that's why he was fired yesterday with two months remaining in his second season. Mazzilli was a dark-horse candidate for the Orioles job in November 2003, but he apparently wowed team executive vice president Jim Beattie and vice president Mike Flanagan during interviews. Inadvertently, that was the first strike against him. From the start, he wasn't owner Peter Angelos' choice.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,Sun Reporter | June 20, 2007
SAN DIEGO -- Brian Roberts endured it with the firing of Mike Hargrove, then Lee Mazzilli and now Sam Perlozzo, three managers he liked and respected. So when he was approached by a small group of reporters in the visiting clubhouse at Petco Park and asked about Perlozzo, he quickly grew agitated. "I've seen managers come and go here," said Roberts, who has been with the Orioles for parts of the past seven seasons. "To tell you the truth, I just want to come here and play baseball. That's all. I am tired of dealing with the manager situation.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko | March 11, 2004
With the plate moving on their young pitchers, the Orioles walked eight batters after the fifth inning yesterday and lost to the Florida Marlins, 15-7. Left-hander Adam Loewen walked all four batters he faced in the sixth, which began with the score tied 2-2 before the Marlins pushed across eight runs. David Crouthers replaced Loewen and allowed a two-run single to catcher Ramon Castro and a two-run double to Wilson Valdez. Another run scored on a wild pitch. Castro and Miguel Cabrera homered off Daniel Cabrera after the Orioles took a 2-0 lead against Marlins starter Dontrelle Willis.
SPORTS
August 5, 2005
"I and everyone with the Orioles wish Johnny the best. He leaves with our gratitude, goodwill and respect." Johnny Oates In: May 23, 1991 (under owner Eli Jacobs) Out: Sept. 26, 1994 Won-lost: 291-270 Winning percentage: .519 "The Orioles will continue to hold Phil in high personal and professional esteem." Phil Regan In: Oct. 16, 1994 Out: Oct. 20, 1995 Won-lost: 71-73 Winning percentage: . 493 "This chapter is over, I wish him well." Davey Johnson In: Oct. 30, 1995 Out: Nov. 5, 1997 Won-lost: 186-138 Winning percentage: .574 "Ray Miller is a gentleman and a fine baseball man. ... My best wishes go out to him in his future endeavors."
SPORTS
July 16, 2005
Ripken night just a way to divert fans' attention I notice that there's another Ripken night coming up! ["Ripken's `Iron Man' record to be celebrated Sept. 5, 6," July 6]. Oh boy, one can hardly wait as Ripken waves to the crowd and slowly, ever so slowly, runs around the field throwing kisses to the crowd. This reenactment of the record-breaking day will cause the fans to forget that another team with a meager payroll, less than an hour away (Washington), is in first place; managed by Frank Robinson, one of the great Orioles who refused to play a flunky role to Angelos.
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