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NEWS
September 13, 1995
Singapore's role as a communications center in Asia is likely to suffer from its long campaign to control what the outside world hears and knows about its institutions. Even with Hong Kong succumbing to China's rule in two years, Singapore is merely convenient and not indispensable as an entrepot for the written and spoken English word in business and news communications.For the second time this year, a Singapore court has penalized the International Herald Tribune for mild comment about Singapore's political affairs.
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NEWS
August 15, 2004
BY ALL ACCOUNTS, Lee Hsien Loong, inaugurated last week as Singapore's third prime minister in its 39 years of independence, is up to the job. He holds degrees from Cambridge and Harvard, rose to brigadier general in the tiny island-state's military, and has served the last 14 years as deputy prime minister and, most recently, as finance minister and central bank chief. But no one should doubt for a moment that he ended up atop the small but economically mighty city's political structure because he is the elder son of Singapore's founder, Lee Kuan Yew. Though retired in 1990, the famously stern patriach has lingered at the helm with titles of convenience, first as "senior minister" and now as -- get this -- "minister mentor."
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NEWS
April 21, 1994
Americans who condemn Singapore's sentence of a U.S. youth to caning for vandalism, like those who praise it, should be aware it is part of a whole fabric of difference between that society and ours.Caning for vandalism was instituted in 1966, to suppress political graffiti. Importing drugs brings execution. There is no crime to speak of, no chewing gum on the subway, no rudeness, no real political opposition or open criticism. This is a far cry from contemporary America, but U.S. families who live there have to comply with the authoritarian laws that make Singapore safe though regimented.
NEWS
By Matthew Miller | November 24, 1996
RICHARD NIXON is still stirring up trouble, even when they're just doing things in his name.The other night, the Nixon Center for Peace and Freedom (an offshoot of the presidential library) bestowed its annual Architect of the New Century Award in Washington. The honoree? Lee Kuan Yew, the 73-year-old former prime minister of Singapore.Many Americans know Mr. Lee only from the infamous ''caning'' episode, when he insisted a few years back that a young American be punished for vandalism in the Asian way. Given Mr. Lee's authoritarian bent -- he often censored media outlets that criticized his government -- his selection was controversial.
NEWS
August 15, 2004
BY ALL ACCOUNTS, Lee Hsien Loong, inaugurated last week as Singapore's third prime minister in its 39 years of independence, is up to the job. He holds degrees from Cambridge and Harvard, rose to brigadier general in the tiny island-state's military, and has served the last 14 years as deputy prime minister and, most recently, as finance minister and central bank chief. But no one should doubt for a moment that he ended up atop the small but economically mighty city's political structure because he is the elder son of Singapore's founder, Lee Kuan Yew. Though retired in 1990, the famously stern patriach has lingered at the helm with titles of convenience, first as "senior minister" and now as -- get this -- "minister mentor."
NEWS
By Matthew Miller | November 24, 1996
RICHARD NIXON is still stirring up trouble, even when they're just doing things in his name.The other night, the Nixon Center for Peace and Freedom (an offshoot of the presidential library) bestowed its annual Architect of the New Century Award in Washington. The honoree? Lee Kuan Yew, the 73-year-old former prime minister of Singapore.Many Americans know Mr. Lee only from the infamous ''caning'' episode, when he insisted a few years back that a young American be punished for vandalism in the Asian way. Given Mr. Lee's authoritarian bent -- he often censored media outlets that criticized his government -- his selection was controversial.
NEWS
May 26, 1994
Singapore is not model of justiceSo the Singapore authorities have cut a deal with young Stephen P. Freehill of Chicago on the vandalism charges that resulted in the caning of Michael Fay. How interesting.Whereas Fay is out more than $2,000 in fines, in prison for at least one more month (with family visits allowed only twice a month) and suffering the effects of four lashes with a wet cane, Freehill gets off with a fine of a little over $500.Earlier this month, Singapore's senior minister, Lee Kuan Yew, told Time magazine representatives that Singapore would lose its moral authority and its right to govern if it didn't cane young Fay.The Singaporean then accused American society of having gone fundamentally wrong.
NEWS
By HAL PIPER | August 12, 1995
I asked the Indonesian diplomat if she thought her country was becoming more democratic.''But we are democratic,'' she rejoined, evidently startled that I didn't know.Well, but, for example, 100 seats in the 500-seat legislature are reserved to the army.Yes, said the diplomat; that is to keep the army out of politics while insuring that its interests are represented. Guided democracy.Suharto, the ex-general who came to power in a blood bath 30 years ago, has been elected to six consecutive presidential terms by an electoral council, most of whose members he appoints.
NEWS
By FRANZ SCHURMANN | December 19, 1993
Singapore -- When Willy Brandt coined the term ''North-South gap'' it seemed Gospel truth that the North would forever be rich and the South poor. But for 5,000 years prior to the 19th century it was the North that was poor and the South that was rich. Now if the North doesn't find a way to reverse its decline, that historic pattern could again reappear.The swath of land from Northeast to Southeast Asia has become the world's premier region of economic growth and political stability. But investment is steadily shifting southward.
NEWS
July 22, 2003
SINGAPORE, THE modern world's only Confucian state, has taken a long look in the mirror - and found itself, well, boring. And among the antidotes, the island's paternalistic government is suggesting - drum roll, please - legalizing bungee jumping. Oh yes, and reverse bungee jumping, which somehow sounds even worse. That's one of many recommendations of the Remaking Singapore Committee, set up by the authoritarians who run the city to keep it globally competitive by inducing more creativity, risk-taking and joie de vivre.
NEWS
September 13, 1995
Singapore's role as a communications center in Asia is likely to suffer from its long campaign to control what the outside world hears and knows about its institutions. Even with Hong Kong succumbing to China's rule in two years, Singapore is merely convenient and not indispensable as an entrepot for the written and spoken English word in business and news communications.For the second time this year, a Singapore court has penalized the International Herald Tribune for mild comment about Singapore's political affairs.
NEWS
By HAL PIPER | August 12, 1995
I asked the Indonesian diplomat if she thought her country was becoming more democratic.''But we are democratic,'' she rejoined, evidently startled that I didn't know.Well, but, for example, 100 seats in the 500-seat legislature are reserved to the army.Yes, said the diplomat; that is to keep the army out of politics while insuring that its interests are represented. Guided democracy.Suharto, the ex-general who came to power in a blood bath 30 years ago, has been elected to six consecutive presidential terms by an electoral council, most of whose members he appoints.
NEWS
May 26, 1994
Singapore is not model of justiceSo the Singapore authorities have cut a deal with young Stephen P. Freehill of Chicago on the vandalism charges that resulted in the caning of Michael Fay. How interesting.Whereas Fay is out more than $2,000 in fines, in prison for at least one more month (with family visits allowed only twice a month) and suffering the effects of four lashes with a wet cane, Freehill gets off with a fine of a little over $500.Earlier this month, Singapore's senior minister, Lee Kuan Yew, told Time magazine representatives that Singapore would lose its moral authority and its right to govern if it didn't cane young Fay.The Singaporean then accused American society of having gone fundamentally wrong.
NEWS
April 21, 1994
Americans who condemn Singapore's sentence of a U.S. youth to caning for vandalism, like those who praise it, should be aware it is part of a whole fabric of difference between that society and ours.Caning for vandalism was instituted in 1966, to suppress political graffiti. Importing drugs brings execution. There is no crime to speak of, no chewing gum on the subway, no rudeness, no real political opposition or open criticism. This is a far cry from contemporary America, but U.S. families who live there have to comply with the authoritarian laws that make Singapore safe though regimented.
NEWS
October 15, 1997
Rabbi Isadore Twersky,67, a Harvard professor whose studies of Jewish literature and medieval intellectual history won him international renown, died in Boston on Sunday after a long illness.Richard Mason,78, a British novelist whose story of a prostitute, "The World of Suzie Wong," became a best seller and later a popular play and film, died of throat cancer Monday in Rome, where he lived for nearly 40 years, his family said.Peter Andreoli,78, a former prosecutor who uncovered a college basketball game-fixing scheme and won convictions of corrupt upstate politicians, died in New York on Saturday.
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