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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1998
After his lip-hanging putt dropped into the cup on the 17th hole at Firestone Country Club during the opening round of last week's NEC World Series of Golf, Lee Janzen got a pat on the back from playing partner Vijay Singh, a roar from the crowd, a par on his scorecard and a lot of air time on the cable broadcast of the event.Too much time, as things turned out.Janzen, who had waited more than 20 seconds for the putt to drop, became the latest professional golfer to be turned in by the sport's rules police, a large and dogged group of weekend hackers who take great pleasure in protecting the laws of the game.
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SPORTS
March 8, 2008
The wind was blowing hard enough to sweep sand out of the bunkers and knock down scores yesterday at the PGA PODS Championship in Palm Harbor, Fla. Jeff Maggert used it to his advantage. Starting his second round with the wind at his back, Maggert birdied three of his opening four holes and hung on long enough to be leading by three shots at the turn when play was suspended for the rest of the day because of storms. Maggert was at 8-under-par, three shots ahead of Kenny Perry and D.J. Trahan.
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SPORTS
March 8, 2008
The wind was blowing hard enough to sweep sand out of the bunkers and knock down scores yesterday at the PGA PODS Championship in Palm Harbor, Fla. Jeff Maggert used it to his advantage. Starting his second round with the wind at his back, Maggert birdied three of his opening four holes and hung on long enough to be leading by three shots at the turn when play was suspended for the rest of the day because of storms. Maggert was at 8-under-par, three shots ahead of Kenny Perry and D.J. Trahan.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2004
POTOMAC - Lee Janzen noticed the difference between last week's U.S. Open and the Booz Allen Classic the moment he stepped onto the grounds of the Tournament Players Club at Avenel earlier this week. "There's not 40,000 people here on Monday or Tuesday or Wednesday," Janzen, a two-time Open champion, said yesterday as he walked unimpeded from the practice range to the first tee for the pro-am. "And there may not be Thursday or Friday." The size of the crowd will not be the only contrast.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | June 16, 1994
OAKMONT, Pa. -- He has gone from afterthought to contender, from defending champion without a legitimate chance to win this year's U.S. Open to a player poised to win his second tournament in as many weeks.Before his victory in last week's Buick Open at Westchester Country Club in the suburbs of New York City, Lee Janzen hadn't won since stunning the golf world across the river at Baltusrol last summer.When he tees it up today at storied Oakmont Country Club outside Pittsburgh for the start of the 94th Open, Janzen won't have to think about getting the magic back.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO -- The Olympic Club has not been kind to front-runners in the 43 years since the U.S. Open first visited the venerable Lake Course. What happened to legends Ben Hogan and Arnold Palmer as well as to Tom Watson happened yesterday to Payne Stewart.And what happened to Jack Fleck and Billy Casper, not to mention Scott Simpson, happened to Lee Janzen.Leading by four shots coming into the final round of the 98th Open and by two shots at the turn, Stewart failed to hold the lead he had owned since Thursday and Janzen stormed though to win by a shot.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | June 21, 1993
SPRINGFIELD, N.J. -- All the dangerous symptoms were showing. The patient was in trouble and in need of oxygen. Here was Lee Janzen, far from a household name, contesting Payne Stewart, the U.S. Open golf champion of only two years ago, and they were locked in a resolute two-man march to the finish line.Janzen had a two-stroke lead, was holding off every threat against his favored and more experienced opponent, when suddenly he began to wobble after the turn for home and let the advantage slip away.
SPORTS
By GEORGE TAYLOR | July 2, 1993
Contrary to rumors, Lee Janzen, the newly crowned U.S. Open champion, does not owe all of his success to an early upbringing in Westminster. Truth of the matter is that Janzen was only 7 years old and in second grade at a Westminster elementary school when he arrived.The closest he came to earning his golf spikes at that time was when his brother, David, a student at Western Maryland College, allowed Lee to take a few swings while following him on the college course.His mother said Lee, as a youth, was more interested in baseball than golf.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1999
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Lee Janzen is going to rely on his success at one particular major championship in approaching the final two rounds of the 63rd Masters.It's not what Janzen has done here in his seven previous visits to Augusta National, but what he has done as a two-time and reigning U.S. Open champion."I think the way the course is set up, it's going to be similar," Janzen said yesterday.After shooting a 3-under-par 69, Janzen found himself at 5-under 139, three shots behind second-round leader Jose Maria Olazabal of Spain.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1999
He has won one more major championship than Tiger Woods and two more than David Duval. He has won twice as many PGA Tour events as Tom Lehman and John Daly. But few know much about Lee Janzen.This is the one week when Janzen will find himself in that sometimes uncomfortable territory called the spotlight. It happens when you are defending champion at the 99th U.S. Open, which will begin Thursday in Pinehurst, N.C.Janzen, 34, could turn out to be the Hale Irwin of his generation -- a solid player, but never a star.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1999
He has won one more major championship than Tiger Woods and two more than David Duval. He has won twice as many PGA Tour events as Tom Lehman and John Daly. But few know much about Lee Janzen.This is the one week when Janzen will find himself in that sometimes uncomfortable territory called the spotlight. It happens when you are defending champion at the 99th U.S. Open, which will begin Thursday in Pinehurst, N.C.Janzen, 34, could turn out to be the Hale Irwin of his generation -- a solid player, but never a star.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1999
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Lee Janzen is going to rely on his success at one particular major championship in approaching the final two rounds of the 63rd Masters.It's not what Janzen has done here in his seven previous visits to Augusta National, but what he has done as a two-time and reigning U.S. Open champion."I think the way the course is set up, it's going to be similar," Janzen said yesterday.After shooting a 3-under-par 69, Janzen found himself at 5-under 139, three shots behind second-round leader Jose Maria Olazabal of Spain.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1998
After his lip-hanging putt dropped into the cup on the 17th hole at Firestone Country Club during the opening round of last week's NEC World Series of Golf, Lee Janzen got a pat on the back from playing partner Vijay Singh, a roar from the crowd, a par on his scorecard and a lot of air time on the cable broadcast of the event.Too much time, as things turned out.Janzen, who had waited more than 20 seconds for the putt to drop, became the latest professional golfer to be turned in by the sport's rules police, a large and dogged group of weekend hackers who take great pleasure in protecting the laws of the game.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO -- The Olympic Club has not been kind to front-runners in the 43 years since the U.S. Open first visited the venerable Lake Course. What happened to legends Ben Hogan and Arnold Palmer as well as to Tom Watson happened yesterday to Payne Stewart.And what happened to Jack Fleck and Billy Casper, not to mention Scott Simpson, happened to Lee Janzen.Leading by four shots coming into the final round of the 98th Open and by two shots at the turn, Stewart failed to hold the lead he had owned since Thursday and Janzen stormed though to win by a shot.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO -- Payne Stewart is still leading the 98th U.S. Open at the Olympic Club. That's big news to the former Open champion, his family, friends and anyone who likes the sight of a 41-year-old man in plaid plus-fours.But the biggest news to emerge here yesterday is that Casey Martin is still in the Open.Though his chance of winning seems slim -- at 5-over-par 145 he trails Stewart by eight shots -- Martin continued to make his own piece of history as the first player ever to use a golf cart in the Open.
SPORTS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 7, 1998
POTOMAC -- Tommy Tolles would have liked to have been able to attribute yesterday's round of 5-under 66 to his change in golf clubs, and Armour Golf certainly would have appreciated the plug. But like any good carpenter, Tolles wasn't about to blame his tools. Instead, he credited his manager, Lyn Roach of Weston, Va., for clearing the "little demons" from his head and putting him back on course."I've been playing kind of scared golf lately," said Tolles, who turned in the best score on a windy day at Avenel.
SPORTS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 7, 1998
POTOMAC -- Tommy Tolles would have liked to have been able to attribute yesterday's round of 5-under 66 to his change in golf clubs, and Armour Golf certainly would have appreciated the plug. But like any good carpenter, Tolles wasn't about to blame his tools. Instead, he credited his manager, Lyn Roach of Weston, Va., for clearing the "little demons" from his head and putting him back on course."I've been playing kind of scared golf lately," said Tolles, who turned in the best score on a windy day at Avenel.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | June 21, 1993
The TV Repairman:Even before Lee Janzen made like Bobby Jones, Walter Hagen, Ben Hogan and Silky Sullivan in the stretch run of the U.S. Open yesterday, ABC had itself a tap-in birdie.DTC Oh, thank you, Jack Nicklaus, for being sufficiently down the scoring list after Round 3 Saturday that you played early and could join the legion of voices on the telecast.Usually, Nicklaus has a tendency to get caught up in technical jargon and comes across as a teaching pro giving a lesson. Almost as soon as he had cleaned up and climbed into his commentary chair this time, however, he was there with the goods on the Janzen-Payne Stewart showdown.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | June 12, 1997
BETHESDA -- Take a poll of an electorate consisting of sports fans and local television sports anchors, and next to a stadium itself, the hands-down favorite place to hang out would be ESPN's "SportsCenter."But there's a great big world out there outside "SportsCenter," as Linda Cohn, one of its stalwarts, is hoping to find out this week as she covers the U.S. Open from the Congressional Country Club for the network."Within the last six months, I've found the keys to unlock the chain to the "SportsCenter" desk," said Cohn.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1996
POTOMAC -- The satisfaction of being on top of the golf world TC left Billy Andrade as quickly as it came.Five years ago, Andrade broke through on the PGA Tour in a very big way. His first victory came at the Kemper Open, and he liked the experience so much, he relived it the following week with a win at the Hartford Open.Andrade was the first player in 12 years to post his inaugural tour victories in consecutive weeks, but a not so funny thing happened on his way to stardom. He hasn't had a successful Sunday since, but Andrade got a leg up on that elusive third tour win with a 5-under 66 in the first round of the Kemper Open yesterday.
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