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By Joann Muller and Joann Muller,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 17, 1992
DETROIT -- Robert Eaton is the first to admit he's no Lee Iacocca."First of all, I'm a lousy writer," said Mr. Eaton, 52, who was chosen to succeed the charismatic chairman of Chrysler Corp., author of two best-selling books."Lee's Lee and I'm me and we're a little bit different," said Mr. Eaton, who said he doesn't crave -- and doubts he'll ever achieve -- Mr. Iacocca's kind of national prominence.Nor is he likely to don a trench coat to star in Chryslertelevision commercials."I doubt if I would have the appeal that Lee has in commercials," Mr. Eaton joked during his first news conference since being named Chrysler's vice chairman and chief operating officer yesterday.
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BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 9, 1993
Forging into record territory for the second consecutive day, the Dow Jones industrial average added 15.65 points yesterday to close at 3,734.53. Since New Year's Day, the Dow is up 433 points, or 13 percent, and from mid-October 1990 through yesterday, the popular indicator has surged 1,369 points, or 57 percent. Before cheering, read on.TIMELY WARNING: "The main factor that fueled the Dow Jones average rise from 2,365 in October 1990 to the 3,700 area is the drop in yields, which also delivered windfall profits to holders of long-term bonds.
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BUSINESS
August 10, 1993
Iacocca sells shares for $56 millionLee Iacocca, who pocketed tens of millions of dollars in salary and stock bonuses during his 13-year reign as chairman of Chrysler Corp., is selling almost half his stake in the automaker.The retired chairman said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that he is selling 1.2 million shares for approximately $56.5 million. Iacocca gave no reason for the sale. The sale was to have taken place last week.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1993
Iacocca sells shares for $56 millionLee Iacocca, who pocketed tens of millions of dollars in salary and stock bonuses during his 13-year reign as chairman of Chrysler Corp., is selling almost half his stake in the automaker.The retired chairman said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that he is selling 1.2 million shares for approximately $56.5 million. Iacocca gave no reason for the sale. The sale was to have taken place last week.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | January 29, 1992
THE BIGGEST Japanese-basher I've ever known -- even bigger than Lee Iacocca -- was Pfc. William Brinkerhoff who served with me in the Marine Corps on Enewitok during World War II.One night in 1944 during an air raid I hugged one side of the foxhole and he hugged the other."
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 15, 1992
George Bush's upset tummy may have had nothing to do with the flu. It may have been caused by spending all those hours with Lee Iacocca.If you wanted concessions from the Japanese, would you have brought Iacocca to Japan with you?It's like bringing David Duke to Nigeria. Or Louis Farrakhan to Israel.Iacocca, the chairman of Chrysler, is one of America's leading Japan-bashers. But at least he's got a good reason: Japan makes better cars than he does.And this drives him wild. Which is why, soon after getting back from Japan, Iacocca made yet another rude speech about the Japanese.
NEWS
By TRB | February 14, 1991
Washington. GI Joe comes back from the war feeling like a hero, only to find that some stay-at-home shirker has stolen his gal and his job. What the heck was he fighting for? When the Persian Gulf war is over, the whole country may sink into this kind of B-movie sulk when it looks around to discover that while we were liberating Kuwait, Japan was continuing its inexorable economic climb. That will surely generate renewed demands that we launch a few Patriots against incoming Japanese products.
BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | December 27, 1991
TOKYO -- The key players in the U.S. and Japanese automobile industries will meet here Jan. 9 to work on what could emerge as a new blueprint for expanding sales of U.S. cars and car parts in Japan.Industry analysts said here yesterday that the chairmen of General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler Corp. will meet with their Japanese counterparts from Toyota Motor Corp., Nissan Motor Co., Honda Motor Co., Mitsubishi Motors Corp. and Mazda Motor Corp.Likely to attend as observers are officials of the U.S. Commerce Department and Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry, possibly accompanied by specialists from Japan's Ministry of Transport.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 9, 1993
Forging into record territory for the second consecutive day, the Dow Jones industrial average added 15.65 points yesterday to close at 3,734.53. Since New Year's Day, the Dow is up 433 points, or 13 percent, and from mid-October 1990 through yesterday, the popular indicator has surged 1,369 points, or 57 percent. Before cheering, read on.TIMELY WARNING: "The main factor that fueled the Dow Jones average rise from 2,365 in October 1990 to the 3,700 area is the drop in yields, which also delivered windfall profits to holders of long-term bonds.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | March 25, 1992
What Clinton took from the Arkansas poultry king was chicken feed.Ross Perot for Veep on the Lee Iacocca ticket!George found the way to balance the budget some day: Make the states pay for everything.The good news is that Albania overthrew the Communists. The bad news is Albania.
BUSINESS
By Joann Muller and Joann Muller,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 17, 1992
DETROIT -- Robert Eaton is the first to admit he's no Lee Iacocca."First of all, I'm a lousy writer," said Mr. Eaton, 52, who was chosen to succeed the charismatic chairman of Chrysler Corp., author of two best-selling books."Lee's Lee and I'm me and we're a little bit different," said Mr. Eaton, who said he doesn't crave -- and doubts he'll ever achieve -- Mr. Iacocca's kind of national prominence.Nor is he likely to don a trench coat to star in Chrysler television commercials."I doubt if I would have the appeal that Lee has in commercials," Mr. Eaton joked during his first news conference since being named Chrysler's vice chairman and chief operating officer yesterday.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | January 29, 1992
THE BIGGEST Japanese-basher I've ever known -- even bigger than Lee Iacocca -- was Pfc. William Brinkerhoff who served with me in the Marine Corps on Enewitok during World War II.One night in 1944 during an air raid I hugged one side of the foxhole and he hugged the other."
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 15, 1992
George Bush's upset tummy may have had nothing to do with the flu. It may have been caused by spending all those hours with Lee Iacocca.If you wanted concessions from the Japanese, would you have brought Iacocca to Japan with you?It's like bringing David Duke to Nigeria. Or Louis Farrakhan to Israel.Iacocca, the chairman of Chrysler, is one of America's leading Japan-bashers. But at least he's got a good reason: Japan makes better cars than he does.And this drives him wild. Which is why, soon after getting back from Japan, Iacocca made yet another rude speech about the Japanese.
BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | December 27, 1991
TOKYO -- The key players in the U.S. and Japanese automobile industries will meet here Jan. 9 to work on what could emerge as a new blueprint for expanding sales of U.S. cars and car parts in Japan.Industry analysts said here yesterday that the chairmen of General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler Corp. will meet with their Japanese counterparts from Toyota Motor Corp., Nissan Motor Co., Honda Motor Co., Mitsubishi Motors Corp. and Mazda Motor Corp.Likely to attend as observers are officials of the U.S. Commerce Department and Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry, possibly accompanied by specialists from Japan's Ministry of Transport.
NEWS
By TRB | February 14, 1991
Washington. GI Joe comes back from the war feeling like a hero, only to find that some stay-at-home shirker has stolen his gal and his job. What the heck was he fighting for? When the Persian Gulf war is over, the whole country may sink into this kind of B-movie sulk when it looks around to discover that while we were liberating Kuwait, Japan was continuing its inexorable economic climb. That will surely generate renewed demands that we launch a few Patriots against incoming Japanese products.
NEWS
July 29, 2000
WHEN SPORT utility vehicle owners were shelling out $50 this spring to fill their gas tanks, a wave of anxiety permeated the Ford Motor Co.'s Dearborn, Mich., headquarters. Top executives worried that if fuel prices remained high or continued to climb, SUV sales would plummet. A drop in SUV sales would have been devastating to Ford's bottom line. The company sells about 800,000 annually -- one-fifth the automobile manufacturer's domestic sales and the most profitable product it offers.
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