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NEWS
May 24, 2006
NATIONAL GOP assails Jefferson search Republican congressional leaders rose to the defense of a Democratic congressman under investigation for possible bribery, accusing the Justice Department of improperly searching William Jefferson's Capitol Hill office. pg 3a Lloyd Bentsen dies at 85 Former Senator and Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen, the courtly Texan who famously put down vice-presidential rival Dan Quayle in a 1988 debate by telling him, "You're no Jack Kennedy," has died. He was 85. pg 4a MARYLAND Sniper master plan detailed Had they not been arrested, Lee Boyd Malvo and John Allen Muhammad would have claimed another sniper victim that day and begun a frightening master plan with Baltimore as the hub of a murderous campaign to use explosives against mourners at a police officers funeral and busloads of schoolchildren, Malvo testified yesterday at Muhammad's murder trial.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
Lee Boyd Malvo is claiming that he and fellow Beltway sniper John Allen Muhammad lined up co-conspirators to broaden the campaign of violence that paralyzed the Washington region eight years ago, but that the collaborators backed away, according to a television interview. Malvo also claimed responsibility for 42 shootings, many more than he and Muhammad had been linked to, according to a forensic psychiatrist who interviewed the man, now 25. The revelations were greeted skeptically by lawyers involved in the case that shook the region in 2002.
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NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 15, 2003
Prosecutors in the sniper cases appear to be pursuing two contradictory theories of the shootings in an attempt to secure the death penalty for both suspects, attorneys for John Allen Muhammad argued in court papers made public yesterday. The Muhammad prosecutors have argued that he was the "captain" of a "killing team" and the moving spirit behind the shootings, which left 10 dead last fall, thus making him eligible for capital punishment even if he was not the person who pulled the trigger.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 12, 2009
The last thoughts of Washington-area sniper John Allen Muhammad are contained in a letter that his relatives had said would be read publicly Wednesday but which was kept under wraps instead. Muhammad, 48, remained silent in the execution chamber in Jarratt, Va., on Tuesday night when asked if he wanted to share any final words. Instead, he had given his family a document that he wanted to be made public, and relatives had planned to read it at a news conference Wednesday. But an attorney for the Muhammad family said that neither the letter nor details about its contents would be disclosed, at least for now. "We have a letter," the attorney, Charlene Patterson, told reporters at a Richmond hotel.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | May 31, 2006
As the first guilty verdict was read in a Montgomery County courtroom yesterday, Oladell Martin covered her mouth and nose with her hands. Tipped with long orange fingernails, they shook as the next guilty verdict was announced. Seeming to blink back tears, she lowered her hands to her lap. Vickie Snider, who sat behind Martin, patted her back as another "guilty" was read, and then three more. Martin, who lives in St. Louis, and Snider lost family members in the 2002 Washington area sniper rampage.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL AND JULIE SCHARPER and ANDREA F. SIEGEL AND JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTERS | May 5, 2006
ROCKVILLE -- Convicted sniper John Allen Muhammad told a jury yesterday that he came to the Washington area on a desperate search for his children, and that he was shocked when he and teenager Lee Boyd Malvo, whom he called "my son," were yanked from their car by authorities and accused of being the snipers who laid siege to the region in 2002. Muhammad, 45, spoke about losing his children and choosing to fight the six murder charges for which he is on trial in Montgomery County, citing Plato, the Constitution and the Gospel of John.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 12, 2009
The last thoughts of Washington-area sniper John Allen Muhammad are contained in a letter that his relatives had said would be read publicly Wednesday but which was kept under wraps instead. Muhammad, 48, remained silent in the execution chamber in Jarratt, Va., on Tuesday night when asked if he wanted to share any final words. Instead, he had given his family a document that he wanted to be made public, and relatives had planned to read it at a news conference Wednesday. But an attorney for the Muhammad family said that neither the letter nor details about its contents would be disclosed, at least for now. "We have a letter," the attorney, Charlene Patterson, told reporters at a Richmond hotel.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Sun reporter | June 20, 2006
The Virginia prosecutors of snipers Lee Boyd Malvo and John Allen Muhammad say they oppose allowing Malvo to serve his life sentence in a federal prison as part of any far-reaching plea agreement, as has been suggested in recent months. Muhammad, 45, on death row in Virginia for a sniper murder, was convicted in May of six fatal sniper shootings in Montgomery County in 2002. He received six life terms without parole. Malvo, 21, serving multiple life sentences for Virginia sniper shootings, had not spoken publicly about the crimes until Muhammad's trial.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 10, 2009
It began in Wheaton with a single gunshot. James D. Martin, 55, had stopped off at a Shoppers Food Warehouse on his way home when, for no apparent reason, an unseen assailant shot and killed him. The next morning, four others in Montgomery County were killed while doing mundane activities - pumping gas, mowing a lawn, sitting on a bench, vacuuming a minivan. A sixth victim fell that night in Washington near the county line. Over three terrifying weeks in October 2002, the so-called Beltway Sniper fatally shot 10 people in the Washington region, ratcheting up anxiety levels all the way from Baltimore to Richmond.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
Lee Boyd Malvo is claiming that he and fellow Beltway sniper John Allen Muhammad lined up co-conspirators to broaden the campaign of violence that paralyzed the Washington region eight years ago, but that the collaborators backed away, according to a television interview. Malvo also claimed responsibility for 42 shootings, many more than he and Muhammad had been linked to, according to a forensic psychiatrist who interviewed the man, now 25. The revelations were greeted skeptically by lawyers involved in the case that shook the region in 2002.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 10, 2009
It began in Wheaton with a single gunshot. James D. Martin, 55, had stopped off at a Shoppers Food Warehouse on his way home when, for no apparent reason, an unseen assailant shot and killed him. The next morning, four others in Montgomery County were killed while doing mundane activities - pumping gas, mowing a lawn, sitting on a bench, vacuuming a minivan. A sixth victim fell that night in Washington near the county line. Over three terrifying weeks in October 2002, the so-called Beltway Sniper fatally shot 10 people in the Washington region, ratcheting up anxiety levels all the way from Baltimore to Richmond.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Sun reporter | June 20, 2006
The Virginia prosecutors of snipers Lee Boyd Malvo and John Allen Muhammad say they oppose allowing Malvo to serve his life sentence in a federal prison as part of any far-reaching plea agreement, as has been suggested in recent months. Muhammad, 45, on death row in Virginia for a sniper murder, was convicted in May of six fatal sniper shootings in Montgomery County in 2002. He received six life terms without parole. Malvo, 21, serving multiple life sentences for Virginia sniper shootings, had not spoken publicly about the crimes until Muhammad's trial.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | May 31, 2006
As the first guilty verdict was read in a Montgomery County courtroom yesterday, Oladell Martin covered her mouth and nose with her hands. Tipped with long orange fingernails, they shook as the next guilty verdict was announced. Seeming to blink back tears, she lowered her hands to her lap. Vickie Snider, who sat behind Martin, patted her back as another "guilty" was read, and then three more. Martin, who lives in St. Louis, and Snider lost family members in the 2002 Washington area sniper rampage.
NEWS
May 24, 2006
NATIONAL GOP assails Jefferson search Republican congressional leaders rose to the defense of a Democratic congressman under investigation for possible bribery, accusing the Justice Department of improperly searching William Jefferson's Capitol Hill office. pg 3a Lloyd Bentsen dies at 85 Former Senator and Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen, the courtly Texan who famously put down vice-presidential rival Dan Quayle in a 1988 debate by telling him, "You're no Jack Kennedy," has died. He was 85. pg 4a MARYLAND Sniper master plan detailed Had they not been arrested, Lee Boyd Malvo and John Allen Muhammad would have claimed another sniper victim that day and begun a frightening master plan with Baltimore as the hub of a murderous campaign to use explosives against mourners at a police officers funeral and busloads of schoolchildren, Malvo testified yesterday at Muhammad's murder trial.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL AND JULIE SCHARPER and ANDREA F. SIEGEL AND JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTERS | May 5, 2006
ROCKVILLE -- Convicted sniper John Allen Muhammad told a jury yesterday that he came to the Washington area on a desperate search for his children, and that he was shocked when he and teenager Lee Boyd Malvo, whom he called "my son," were yanked from their car by authorities and accused of being the snipers who laid siege to the region in 2002. Muhammad, 45, spoke about losing his children and choosing to fight the six murder charges for which he is on trial in Montgomery County, citing Plato, the Constitution and the Gospel of John.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
Hamlet: Was't Hamlet wrong'd Laertes? Never Hamlet: If Hamlet from himself be ta'en away, And when he's not himself does wrong Laertes, Then Hamlet does it not, Hamlet denies it. Who does it, then? His madness ...- Hamlet, Act V, Scene II Lee Boyd Malvo hopes to go where Patty Hearst, David Berkowitz, Jack Ruby and Andrea Yates could not. Each of those other high-profile defendants pleaded insanity as a defense against grave criminal charges. Each of them failed. Instead of the hospital ward they sought, every one of them ended up in a prison cell.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
Hamlet: Was't Hamlet wrong'd Laertes? Never Hamlet: If Hamlet from himself be ta'en away, And when he's not himself does wrong Laertes, Then Hamlet does it not, Hamlet denies it. Who does it, then? His madness ...- Hamlet, Act V, Scene II Lee Boyd Malvo hopes to go where Patty Hearst, David Berkowitz, Jack Ruby and Andrea Yates could not. Each of those other high-profile defendants pleaded insanity as a defense against grave criminal charges. Each of them failed. Instead of the hospital ward they sought, every one of them ended up in a prison cell.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 15, 2003
Prosecutors in the sniper cases appear to be pursuing two contradictory theories of the shootings in an attempt to secure the death penalty for both suspects, attorneys for John Allen Muhammad argued in court papers made public yesterday. The Muhammad prosecutors have argued that he was the "captain" of a "killing team" and the moving spirit behind the shootings, which left 10 dead last fall, thus making him eligible for capital punishment even if he was not the person who pulled the trigger.
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