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By Peter D. Franklin | June 9, 1993
NEW ORLEANS -- It was only fitting that the "coming out" party for "Lee Bailey's New Orleans: Good Food and Glorious Houses" (Clarkson Potter, $30) be at the incomparable Commander's Palace restaurant here.Mr. Bailey long has been a chum of Ella Brennan, whose name has been associated with the restaurant and with outstanding food in the Crescent City for more than 40 years. That's why, on the cover, the author shares the credit "with Ella Brennan."The Brennans -- there are so many that they "reckon up by dozens" -- have three restaurants here now: Mr. B's, the Palace Cafe and Commander's Palace.
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NEWS
November 29, 2005
Suddenly on November 26, 2005, JAMES L. "Jimmy" BAILEY II; beloved husband of Karen Lee Bailey; loving father of James III and Erin Nicole Bailey; Pop Pop of Christopher Lee Bailey; devoted son of James and Patricia Bailey; cherished brother of Catherine O'Dea, Lisa Bailey and Janet Kuhn; dear brother-in-law of Thomas O'Dea and John Kuhn; loving uncle of many nieces and nephews. Relatives and friends may call at the family owned AMBROSE FUNERAL HOME, INC., 1328 Sulphur Spring Road, Arbutus, on Wednesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated Thursday at 10 A.M. at Our Lady of Victory Catholic.
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FEATURES
By Arnie Rosenberg and Arnie Rosenberg,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 7, 1993
CLEVELAND -- F. Lee Bailey knew the man whose case inspired "The Fugitive" television series, but he's not sure he'll venture out to see the film."It's not going to aid my understanding of the Sheppard case, but I'm a Harrison Ford fan," says Mr. Bailey, the celebrated attorney who won Dr. Sam Sheppard's release in a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case.Mr. Bailey calls the case "probably the greatest whodunit" in the country.Sheppard, an osteopath, was convicted of the 1954 murder of his wife and spent 10 years and 15 days behind bars.
NEWS
June 24, 2004
WARREN LEE BAILEY of Baltimore died of cardiac arrest on June 15 at the age of 88. He was President of his junior and senior class at Forest Park High, graduated from W and L and the U of MD Law School. He served in WWII and after a career in Real Estate he retired to Ft. Lauderdale, FL. He is survived by his wife Betty, sister Elizabeth Stoddard and daughter Lynn Martin. A memorial will be held on June 26th at Christ Church, Ft. Lauderdale, FL.
NEWS
November 29, 2005
Suddenly on November 26, 2005, JAMES L. "Jimmy" BAILEY II; beloved husband of Karen Lee Bailey; loving father of James III and Erin Nicole Bailey; Pop Pop of Christopher Lee Bailey; devoted son of James and Patricia Bailey; cherished brother of Catherine O'Dea, Lisa Bailey and Janet Kuhn; dear brother-in-law of Thomas O'Dea and John Kuhn; loving uncle of many nieces and nephews. Relatives and friends may call at the family owned AMBROSE FUNERAL HOME, INC., 1328 Sulphur Spring Road, Arbutus, on Wednesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated Thursday at 10 A.M. at Our Lady of Victory Catholic.
NEWS
June 24, 2004
WARREN LEE BAILEY of Baltimore died of cardiac arrest on June 15 at the age of 88. He was President of his junior and senior class at Forest Park High, graduated from W and L and the U of MD Law School. He served in WWII and after a career in Real Estate he retired to Ft. Lauderdale, FL. He is survived by his wife Betty, sister Elizabeth Stoddard and daughter Lynn Martin. A memorial will be held on June 26th at Christ Church, Ft. Lauderdale, FL.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | March 22, 1995
As a former Marine and a former Baltimore City police detective, Jim Dunphy, 65, is extremely well-qualified for what he does every day:He watches the O. J. Simpson trial.And his assessment thus far?"I wouldn't let F. Lee Bailey represent me on a traffic ticket," Dunphy said.But as the entire free world knows, Bailey, too, was a Marine. So what about loyalty to a fellow Leatherneck and Semper Fi and all that?"I wouldn't let Bailey represent me on a parking ticket," Dunphy said.Dunphy bases this pungent (and I would say correct)
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | March 19, 1995
Transcript, Trial of the Century, Day 257Bailiff: Hear ye, hear ye, the court is now in sess . . .Defense: Objection, your honor.Judge: To what?Defense: Nothing, your honor. We're just warming up.Prosecution: Your honor, the people would like to state that we also have no objections at this time.Defense: Objection, your honor. Every time the defense says something, the prosecution always feels it has to say something.Prosecution: The people do not.Defense: Do too.Prosecution: Do not.Defense: Do too.Defendant: OK, stop, I confess!
NEWS
April 11, 2000
William R. Miles Sr., 82, NSA division director William R. Miles Sr., a retired National Security Agency division director and former Navy submariner, died Sunday from complications of heart-bypass surgery at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 82 and lived in Catonsville. After 17 years at the NSA at Fort Meade, he retired in 1973. Born and raised on Walbrook Avenue in West Baltimore, Mr. Miles attended Polytechnic Institute before he enlisted in the Navy. He spent his entire career aboard submarines and, during World War II, completed 13 patrols in the Pacific.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | March 8, 1995
AFTER MANY years of watching the most widely celebrated trial in human history, I slipped quietly into a coma. Johnnie Cochran objected. I was deeply flattered.Johnnie Cochran was the most brilliant defense attorney to put a leaden thumb on the scales of justice since Socrates argued his own case. Now he was objecting to my very own coma. Surely there were rich book possibilities here.Judge Lance Ito dealt summarily with him. "Cochran," said Judge Ito, "go eat your prunes." Marcia Clark objected that it was unfair to give dietary advice to the defense.
NEWS
April 11, 2000
William R. Miles Sr., 82, NSA division director William R. Miles Sr., a retired National Security Agency division director and former Navy submariner, died Sunday from complications of heart-bypass surgery at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 82 and lived in Catonsville. After 17 years at the NSA at Fort Meade, he retired in 1973. Born and raised on Walbrook Avenue in West Baltimore, Mr. Miles attended Polytechnic Institute before he enlisted in the Navy. He spent his entire career aboard submarines and, during World War II, completed 13 patrols in the Pacific.
NEWS
March 16, 1996
Former Ohio Rep. Donald Lukens was convicted yesterday of taking $15,000 in bribes from the operators of a trade school while he was a congressman.The U.S. District Court jury deliberated for just one hour before reaching the verdict. Sentencing was scheduled June 10.Lukens said he had no comment. His lawyer, Harvey Volzer, promised to appeal. Lukens was being retried on one count each of bribery and conspiracy after a previous jury acquitted him of three bribery counts but deadlocked on the others.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | March 22, 1995
As a former Marine and a former Baltimore City police detective, Jim Dunphy, 65, is extremely well-qualified for what he does every day:He watches the O. J. Simpson trial.And his assessment thus far?"I wouldn't let F. Lee Bailey represent me on a traffic ticket," Dunphy said.But as the entire free world knows, Bailey, too, was a Marine. So what about loyalty to a fellow Leatherneck and Semper Fi and all that?"I wouldn't let Bailey represent me on a parking ticket," Dunphy said.Dunphy bases this pungent (and I would say correct)
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | March 19, 1995
Transcript, Trial of the Century, Day 257Bailiff: Hear ye, hear ye, the court is now in sess . . .Defense: Objection, your honor.Judge: To what?Defense: Nothing, your honor. We're just warming up.Prosecution: Your honor, the people would like to state that we also have no objections at this time.Defense: Objection, your honor. Every time the defense says something, the prosecution always feels it has to say something.Prosecution: The people do not.Defense: Do too.Prosecution: Do not.Defense: Do too.Defendant: OK, stop, I confess!
NEWS
By Russell Baker | March 8, 1995
AFTER MANY years of watching the most widely celebrated trial in human history, I slipped quietly into a coma. Johnnie Cochran objected. I was deeply flattered.Johnnie Cochran was the most brilliant defense attorney to put a leaden thumb on the scales of justice since Socrates argued his own case. Now he was objecting to my very own coma. Surely there were rich book possibilities here.Judge Lance Ito dealt summarily with him. "Cochran," said Judge Ito, "go eat your prunes." Marcia Clark objected that it was unfair to give dietary advice to the defense.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | February 3, 1995
THE ONLY topic of conversation that anyone will pay attention to is the O.J. Simpson trial. Therefore, it is important that when you meet people you are prepared to say something intelligent to prove that you understand what's going on.Here are a few one-liners you can drop at a dinner or party:I haven't watched the trial, but I read the book.I was once on a sequestered jury for a month, and I wound up taking Prozac.It doesn't matter if O.J. did it or not -- he should be punished for screwing up our day.The only thing I know about the trial is that you can't have enough DNA to make the prosecution happy.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | February 3, 1995
THE ONLY topic of conversation that anyone will pay attention to is the O.J. Simpson trial. Therefore, it is important that when you meet people you are prepared to say something intelligent to prove that you understand what's going on.Here are a few one-liners you can drop at a dinner or party:I haven't watched the trial, but I read the book.I was once on a sequestered jury for a month, and I wound up taking Prozac.It doesn't matter if O.J. did it or not -- he should be punished for screwing up our day.The only thing I know about the trial is that you can't have enough DNA to make the prosecution happy.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 20, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- The Dream Team emerged from the elevator on the ground floor of the Criminal Courts Building and charged the waiting microphone like moths gang-tackling a flame.They are O. J. Simpson's lead attorneys: Johnnie Cochran, Robert Shapiro and F. Lee Bailey. And, having just finished pleading their case in a court of law this day, they were now preparing to plead it in the court of public opinion.Sometimes it is hard to tell which seems more important to them.O. J. Simpson, on trial for two murders, cares only about what happens in court.
NEWS
By Roger Simon and Roger Simon,Sun Columnist | January 23, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- He is taken from a windowless cell in Men's Central Jail to a windowless holding room on the ninth floor of the Criminal Courts building on the gritty, northern edge of downtown L.A.There, the deputies, who laugh and joke with him (O. J. Simpson is a model prisoner, after all) unlock his shackles, and he changes out of his blue jail jumpsuit.He must wear the jumpsuit a week before it is washed, though he is allowed to change his underwear twice each week.In the holding room, one of his lawyers hands him a suit from the extensive wardrobe Simpson keeps at his home on North Rockingham Avenue.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 20, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- The Dream Team emerged from the elevator on the ground floor of the Criminal Courts Building and charged the waiting microphone like moths gang-tackling a flame.They are O. J. Simpson's lead attorneys: Johnnie Cochran, Robert Shapiro and F. Lee Bailey. And, having just finished pleading their case in a court of law this day, they were now preparing to plead it in the court of public opinion.Sometimes it is hard to tell which seems more important to them.O. J. Simpson, on trial for two murders, cares only about what happens in court.
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