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By Thomas Bonk and Thomas Bonk,Los Angeles Times | November 30, 1991
LYON, France -- All you need to know about how the first day of the France-U.S. Davis Cup final went yesterday was the final scene:Henri Leconte sprang into the air like a popped champagne cork and blew kisses.Pete Sampras stared at the ground and grimly trudged off into a darkened tunnel.Guess who won.In his Davis Cup debut, Sampras fell flatter than a bad souffle and lost in straight sets, 6-4, 7-5, 6-4, to Leconte, the crafty left-handed veteran of 39 Davis Cup matches and three spinal operations -- back from the dead, according to Yannick Noah, to put on the performance of his life.
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NEWS
November 15, 2008
Man sentenced in teen's stabbing outside mall A Howard County man was sentenced to 15 years in prison yesterday after pleading guilty to attempted second-degree murder in the stabbing of another teen outside The Mall in Columbia this year. Bernado Leconte, 19, could have received 30 years for the charge. Circuit Judge Lenore Gelfman handed down a sentence of 20 years, with five years suspended, as well as five years' probation. The stabbing victim, then-17-year-old Julian Lichtenstein, had arranged to sell marijuana to Leconte and a co-defendant in the case, Cordero Dante Taylor, outside the JCPenney store about 4:30 p.m. Jan. 8, according to prosecutors and witness testimony.
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SPORTS
By Thomas Bonk and Thomas Bonk,Los Angeles Times | December 1, 1991
LYON, France -- France, the country that has given the United States such items as the Statue of Liberty, Brigitte Bardot and Bordelaise sauce, looks as if it is about to take something back.That would be the Davis Cup, which is just one more victory by the French away from getting crated up and sent to Paris for a year-long stay.Yesterday, on a gray day in a stadium on the banks of the Rhone River, the U.S. doubles team of Ken Flach and Robert Seguso sank like a leaky boat, 6-1, 6-4, 4-6, 6-2, capsized by Guy Forget and the suddenly revived Henri Leconte.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | August 29, 2008
A Howard County man pleaded guilty yesterday to attempted second-degree murder in the stabbing of a teenager after a drug deal went sour outside a Columbia mall this year. Bernardo Leconte, 18, of Columbia, could face 30 years in prison. However, prosecutors recommended a sentence of 20 years, with all but 15 suspended. State sentencing guidelines suggest a sentence of five to 12 years. The near-fatal stabbing, which occurred on a weekday afternoon when the mall bustled with shoppers, shocked Columbia residents unaccustomed to violent crime in the Town Center.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | April 26, 2008
The stabbing of a Howard County 17-year-old by two teens outside The Mall in Columbia in January was the culmination of a drug deal gone bad, an investigator said yesterday. New details of the incident emerged at a hearing in Howard County Circuit Court, during which a judge denied a request that the 16-year-old defendant be tried as a juvenile. Cordero Dante Taylor was charged as an adult in the Jan. 10 stabbing of Julian Lichtenstein, who was 17 at the time of the incident. Taylor, of Forestville in Prince George's County, and the other suspect, Bernardo Leconte, 18, of Columbia, were charged with attempted first- and second-degree murder, first- and second-degree assault, carrying a concealed weapon and reckless endangerment.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | August 2, 2008
A teenager convicted of aiding in the near-fatal stabbing of another teenager at The Mall in Columbia this year was sentenced yesterday to 10 years in prison in Howard County Circuit Court. Cordero Dante Taylor, 17, of Forestville in Prince George's County, was convicted last month of first-degree assault after a co-defendant, Bernardo Leconte, 18, stabbed a 17-year-old Baltimore County boy, Julian Lichtenstein, several times in the mall parking lot after a drug deal went bad. Taylor was tried as an adult.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | August 29, 2008
A Howard County man pleaded guilty yesterday to attempted second-degree murder in the stabbing of a teenager after a drug deal went sour outside a Columbia mall this year. Bernardo Leconte, 18, of Columbia, could face 30 years in prison. However, prosecutors recommended a sentence of 20 years, with all but 15 suspended. State sentencing guidelines suggest a sentence of five to 12 years. The near-fatal stabbing, which occurred on a weekday afternoon when the mall bustled with shoppers, shocked Columbia residents unaccustomed to violent crime in the Town Center.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2008
A teenager on trial for his role in a knife attack on another teen outside a Columbia mall should not face an attempted-murder charge because he was not the one who stabbed the victim, the defendant's attorney argued yesterday. The only crime committed by Cordero Dante Taylor, 16, was drug possession, Taylor's attorney, Gabriel A. Terrasa, said during opening statements in Howard County Circuit Court. Taylor is one of two teens charged in the January attack on Julian Lichtenstein, a Baltimore County resident who was stabbed several times after a drug deal went bad in the parking lot of The Mall in Columbia.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 25, 2000
Romance, intrigue and old-fashioned movie glamour make a dazzling return in "Girl on the Bridge," Patrice Leconte's sumptuous love story with a razor-sharp edge. Vanessa Paradis plays Adele, a coltish young woman whom we meet as she's answering a series of questions from an unseen interlocutor. As if in a particularly clinical group therapy session, Adele explains that she's never had good luck with men: A liaison with a psychologist turns into an affair with an anesthesiologist, who gives way to a restaurant manager.
NEWS
November 15, 2008
Man sentenced in teen's stabbing outside mall A Howard County man was sentenced to 15 years in prison yesterday after pleading guilty to attempted second-degree murder in the stabbing of another teen outside The Mall in Columbia this year. Bernado Leconte, 19, could have received 30 years for the charge. Circuit Judge Lenore Gelfman handed down a sentence of 20 years, with five years suspended, as well as five years' probation. The stabbing victim, then-17-year-old Julian Lichtenstein, had arranged to sell marijuana to Leconte and a co-defendant in the case, Cordero Dante Taylor, outside the JCPenney store about 4:30 p.m. Jan. 8, according to prosecutors and witness testimony.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | August 2, 2008
A teenager convicted of aiding in the near-fatal stabbing of another teenager at The Mall in Columbia this year was sentenced yesterday to 10 years in prison in Howard County Circuit Court. Cordero Dante Taylor, 17, of Forestville in Prince George's County, was convicted last month of first-degree assault after a co-defendant, Bernardo Leconte, 18, stabbed a 17-year-old Baltimore County boy, Julian Lichtenstein, several times in the mall parking lot after a drug deal went bad. Taylor was tried as an adult.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | July 2, 2008
Though he was acquitted of attempted murder, a teenager accused in a knife attack on another teen at the Mall in Columbia was convicted yesterday of first-degree assault in Howard County court. Cordero Dante Taylor, 16, could be sentenced to up to 25 years in prison for his role in the knifing of Julian Lichtenstein, 17, in the JC Penney parking lot in January. Although Circuit Judge Richard S. Bernhardt conceded that Taylor's friend, Bernardo Leconte, stabbed Lichtenstein, he ruled that state law holds a person who aids and abets an assault equally responsible.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2008
A teenager on trial for his role in a knife attack on another teen outside a Columbia mall should not face an attempted-murder charge because he was not the one who stabbed the victim, the defendant's attorney argued yesterday. The only crime committed by Cordero Dante Taylor, 16, was drug possession, Taylor's attorney, Gabriel A. Terrasa, said during opening statements in Howard County Circuit Court. Taylor is one of two teens charged in the January attack on Julian Lichtenstein, a Baltimore County resident who was stabbed several times after a drug deal went bad in the parking lot of The Mall in Columbia.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | April 26, 2008
The stabbing of a Howard County 17-year-old by two teens outside The Mall in Columbia in January was the culmination of a drug deal gone bad, an investigator said yesterday. New details of the incident emerged at a hearing in Howard County Circuit Court, during which a judge denied a request that the 16-year-old defendant be tried as a juvenile. Cordero Dante Taylor was charged as an adult in the Jan. 10 stabbing of Julian Lichtenstein, who was 17 at the time of the incident. Taylor, of Forestville in Prince George's County, and the other suspect, Bernardo Leconte, 18, of Columbia, were charged with attempted first- and second-degree murder, first- and second-degree assault, carrying a concealed weapon and reckless endangerment.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and June Arney and Tyeesha Dixon and June Arney,Sun Reporters | January 10, 2008
The stabbing of a 17-year-old boy at The Mall in Columbia on Tuesday is believed to be drug-related, police said yesterday as they announced that two teenagers had been charged in the incident. Word that arrests had been made, and that the crime was not believed to be random, came as a relief to some shoppers at the mall, but some said they remained surprised that violence had come to one of the Howard County community's prime gathering spots. "I didn't feel that something like that would happen in this area," Linda Hand of Clarksville said outside JC Penney, not far from where the crime occurred.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 30, 2003
Man on the Train achieves a singular feat. It expands the chance encounter of an old-pro thief (Johnny Hallyday) and a retired small-town poetry teacher (Jean Rochefort) into a beguiling fugue on character and destiny. In movies, the issues of men facing calamity or death, examining where they've been and what they hope for, too often focus on a single, deadly serious figure. This film's director, Patrice Leconte, yokes two solitary opposites - a rambler and a nester - and makes their existential duet something serendipitous and droll, not artificially philosophic.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | May 31, 1992
PARIS -- Henri Leconte, who calls it a miracle that he is stillplaying tennis, got a firm grip on his racket yesterday and suddenly it turned into Excalibur: Goodbye, fourth seed Michael Stich, last year's French Open semifinalist and defending Wimbledon champion.Andrei Cherkasov, whose first-round defeat of John McEnroe in Paris last year gave warning that this Muscovite is a most comfortable giant-killer, spent a full three sets in the elusive zone that packs a terminator's punch into every stroke: Goodbye, second seed Stefan Edberg, the defending U.S. Open champion, in straight sets.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | July 2, 2008
Though he was acquitted of attempted murder, a teenager accused in a knife attack on another teen at the Mall in Columbia was convicted yesterday of first-degree assault in Howard County court. Cordero Dante Taylor, 16, could be sentenced to up to 25 years in prison for his role in the knifing of Julian Lichtenstein, 17, in the JC Penney parking lot in January. Although Circuit Judge Richard S. Bernhardt conceded that Taylor's friend, Bernardo Leconte, stabbed Lichtenstein, he ruled that state law holds a person who aids and abets an assault equally responsible.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 25, 2000
Romance, intrigue and old-fashioned movie glamour make a dazzling return in "Girl on the Bridge," Patrice Leconte's sumptuous love story with a razor-sharp edge. Vanessa Paradis plays Adele, a coltish young woman whom we meet as she's answering a series of questions from an unseen interlocutor. As if in a particularly clinical group therapy session, Adele explains that she's never had good luck with men: A liaison with a psychologist turns into an affair with an anesthesiologist, who gives way to a restaurant manager.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 14, 1996
My right arm is in a sling and the painful fracture at the elbow makes typing difficult. (For the inquisitive among you, I was injured wrestling my 3-year-old grandson, who turned out to be a tougher opponent than I figured. But I managed to take two of three falls from the tyke.)What's a columnist to do? I've opted for the easy way out and have decided to continue with responses from readers. That way, I can simply type in readers' comments and not have to think of ideas of my own. I don't think well when I'm in pain.
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