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By Bilal Y. Saab | January 18, 2011
The moment of truth for Lebanon has come. Two days ago, Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) Prosecutor Daniel Bellemare sent a draft indictment over the February 2005 assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri to his colleague, Daniel Fransen, the STL pre-trial judge. Mr. Fransen's job now is to review it and decide whether or not to confirm it; this may take up to 10 weeks. Members of Hezbollah, the Lebanese politico-militant group, and possibly Syrian individuals, will be accused of the crime, but what remains a complete mystery is the nature of the STL's indictment and the manner with which it will be viewed and received by the Lebanese people.
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NEWS
By Sam Wazan | November 18, 2013
Desperately yearning for the carnage of the Lebanese civil war to end, my mother once told a neighbor, "I don't know whether to prepare dinner for my children or myself for a funeral. " It was 1975, I was 10 years old, and my neighborhood in Beirut had disintegrated into a combat zone. I took shelter between the stairways and garages to avoid sniper fire, rocket shrapnel and tank artillery. Of course, had chemical weapons been fired, I would have perished no matter where I hid. But I survived and managed to immigrate to the United States in 1989.
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NEWS
July 3, 1991
Lebanon's army is trying to do what Israel failed to accomplish in its 1982 invasion of that nation. That is to drive the PLO guerrillas and terrorists out of southern Lebanon. But the motives are different. Israel wanted to stop raids from across the border, and punish those who commit them. The Lebanese government of President Elias Hrawi wants to reclaim Lebanon's soil, end the fragmentation that ensued from the 1975 civil war and restore Lebanese sovereignty.That should provide no problem for Israel, which never had a problem with a Lebanon that was truly independent.
NEWS
By Charles Campbell | November 29, 2012
Titillation over David Petraeus and political posturing over Susan Rice aside, here is the most important unasked question: Why did we foster regime change in Libya and Egypt that gave the Muslim Brotherhood control in the latter and produced a gaggle of Islamic militias in the former? Earlier, we forced elections in Lebanon and Palestine that gave Hezbollah control in Lebanon and Hamas the Gaza Strip. Again, why? Replacing the Mubarak government has left the border between Gaza and Egypt more open for weapons deliveries to Hamas, which produced the latest conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.
NEWS
November 20, 2006
The assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri, which rocked Lebanon more than a year ago, remains a potent force in the country's politics. The Lebanese government recently endorsed a special international court to try Mr. Hariri's suspected killers, despite protests by politicians backed by the powerful Islamic militant group Hezbollah. Prime Minister Fouad Siniora, an ally of Mr. Hariri who is struggling to hold on, has been battling with Hezbollah over its efforts to control the government.
NEWS
May 22, 2007
The plumes of black smoke rising this week from a Palestinian refugee camp in Lebanon and the sound of gunfire are eerily reminiscent of the country's decades-old civil war and the ethnic fault lines that kept it going for 15 years. The difference now is that Lebanon's military is fighting to rout a new band of extremists, clearly well armed and reportedly influenced by al-Qaida. The government of Prime Minister Fouad Siniora is asserting itself - as it must to protect this fledgling democracy.
NEWS
By David Schenker | October 19, 2007
Forty Lebanese members of parliament belonging to the pro-Western, anti-Syria March 14 majority bloc reside in Tower 3 at Beirut's Phoenicia Intercontinental Hotel. With plush couches, stereos and flat-screen TVs, the two-bedroom units at the Phoenicia are swank. But the lawmakers aren't guests; they're prisoners. To get into the Phoenicia, you have to traverse no fewer than three security checkpoints, pass through a metal detector and show ID. Armed escorts from Lebanon's Internal Security Forces accompany guests to their rooms.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | August 2, 1993
Paris. -- The power of the weak lies in their capacity to endure the punishment of the strong, to the strong's frustration. On Israel's Lebanon front something approaching a half-million of the weak now are being driven northward from their homes, from a region which Israel now intends to make into what soldiers call dead ground.This is retaliation for the provocations of the weak. These are not insignificant provocations. They have consisted of seven dead Israeli soldiers in recent days, and constant insecurity in the Israeli settlements near the border with Lebanon, subjected to random rocket fire and the occasional and suicidal terrorist raid.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 8, 1991
JERUSALEM -- The Israeli government made clear yesterday that it has no intention of withdrawing from its security zone in southern Lebanon, even as the Lebanese army consolidates its control over Palestinians in the area.The Lebanese government is reported to have asked U.S. representatives for help in prompting the Israelis to leave as part of an effort to take control of the whole country.In Jerusalem, officials said the Israeli presence was not necessarily permanent but set terms suggesting that their army is unlikely to leave Lebanon for a long time.
NEWS
By James Martin | January 16, 2008
After a week of whirlwind travel throughout the Middle East, President Bush returns to the U.S. today hoping that his trip has secured the support of Persian Gulf states in America's drive to counter Iran's regional ambitions. But while Mr. Bush worked to draft Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates into a reinvigorated containment strategy for Iran, and while U.S. and Iranian warships played chicken in the Strait of Hormuz, another conflict between Washington and Tehran was quietly unfolding in Lebanon.
NEWS
November 27, 2012
While reading G. Jefferson Price's column ("For Israel, it's different this time," Nov. 20), I was reminded of the quip "learned nothing, forgot nothing" describing a reactionary French royal family. Mr. Price displays the same distorted views toward Israel he showed 35 years ago when he was The Sun's Middle East correspondent, intervening events not budging his attitudes. According to Mr. Price, Israel "acts with impunity" against Palestinian Arabs and Lebanon. Unmentioned are thousands of Israeli casualties, two Arab uprisings, withdrawals from Gaza, Lebanon and major portions of the West Bank.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s recent column ("The Obama doctrine: Passivity where leadership is needed," Oct. 14) continues to present a flawed ideological position on the Middle East when a heterodox view is in order. We entered the Middle East and North Africa for only one reason: oil. We lost the oil reserves by 1980. Over the last 40 years every administration and Congress has careened from one costly political and military debacle to another in Gaza, Iran, Lebanon, Iraq, Pakistan and Afghanistan.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | March 23, 2011
Folks, if you bought some Seltzer brand Lebanon bologna (it kinda looks like salami) please check the label to see if your package was affected by the recall announced Tuesday. Palmyra Bologna Company of Pennsylvania is recalling 23,000 pounds of Lebanon bologna due to a high risk of E. coli contamination, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service. The fermented semi-dry sausage was sent to distributors in California, Colorado, New York, Pennsylvania and Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Matt Porterfield is a hard-knocks poet — a rhapsodist in black and blue — whose work gains strength from its Baltimore roots. Porterfield located his first two movies, 2007's "Hamilton" and his current "Putty Hill," quite ruthlessly in the Baltimore neighborhhoods that give these films their names. So acute is his focus on authentic textures and characters — and so revealing are the epiphanies he ignites on the fly — that these tales of working-class endurance and rebellion have reverberated around the world.
NEWS
By Bilal Y. Saab | January 18, 2011
The moment of truth for Lebanon has come. Two days ago, Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) Prosecutor Daniel Bellemare sent a draft indictment over the February 2005 assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri to his colleague, Daniel Fransen, the STL pre-trial judge. Mr. Fransen's job now is to review it and decide whether or not to confirm it; this may take up to 10 weeks. Members of Hezbollah, the Lebanese politico-militant group, and possibly Syrian individuals, will be accused of the crime, but what remains a complete mystery is the nature of the STL's indictment and the manner with which it will be viewed and received by the Lebanese people.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | January 16, 2011
Junior BJ Smith ( Overlea) banked in a 65-foot shot at the buzzer, completing Widener's rally from a 16-point second-half deficit for a 71-70 Commonwealth Conference victory over visiting Lebanon Valley on Saturday. Smith made a 3-pointer from the left corner with 2.3 seconds to bring the Pride (9-6, 4-1) to within two, then Sam Diaz missed the front end of a one-and-one that could have iced the game for the Dutchmen (9-6, 1-4). Senior Jarrell Nelson grabbed the rebound and gave the ball on the right side to Smith, who made the buzzer-beater, giving Widener its first lead since 8-7 with 14:24 left in the first half.
NEWS
By Robert Satloff | May 16, 2000
NEARLY 17 years after the bombing of the U.S. Marine barracks in Beirut soured Washington on dealing with the quagmire of Lebanon, that small, strife-torn country is once again poised to take center stage in U.S. Middle East diplomacy. This time, the precipitating event is Israel's decision to withdraw by July 7 about 1,500 troops from southern Lebanon, where Israel has maintained a 9-mile wide "security zone" against terrorist attacks on northern Israel. Militarily, Israel's concept of "forward defense" against terrorism has been a success -- virtually no Israeli civilians have died in cross-border incursions since the zone was set up in 1985.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | July 28, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- How do you define victory? That is the question that Condoleezza Rice and Israeli leaders must ask themselves as diplomatic efforts intensify to end the Lebanon crisis. Through the smoke and bombs, one can see the outlines of a deal that would satisfy key Israeli security demands while halting the bombing that is harming so many Lebanese civilians. But such a deal requires a separation between political rhetoric - which promises more than can be delivered by bombing - and the achievement of the possible.
NEWS
By Bilal Y. Saab | August 16, 2010
Could this be the beginning of the end of Hezbollah? For the first time since its official emergence in 1985, Lebanon's powerful Shiite "Party of God" is feeling nervous about its future as an autonomous and untouchable politico-military organization. It is not a potential war with Israel that is making Hezbollah anxious, though it is doing everything it can to prevent one from happening. Instead, what deeply worries Hezbollah is a string of events that could unfold at home following an expected indictment of the group — or at least rogue elements within it — by the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL)
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | December 16, 2009
Michael Jarboe scored a career-high 17 points, including a career-best five 3-pointers and the go-ahead free throws with 2:37 to play, to help host McDaniel to a 67-62 victory over Lebanon Valley in a nonconference game. The Green Terror (5-2) used a 16-4 run late in the game to overcome a 56-51 deficit with 4:46 to play en route to its largest offensive output of the season. Miguel Jones (North County) also had 17 points. Zach Kebetz led the Flying Dutchmen (5-4) with 14 points off the bench.
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