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By Francine Parnes and Francine Parnes,AP Newsfeatures | June 19, 1991
This season's color story is looking on the bright side. It serves up a tropical punch of tutti-frutti hues. Fruit-flavored colors go head to toe, either monochromatically or in incendiary combinations.Not only do the splashy shades look good, they also provide instant feel-good."Brights have always psychologically created an up feeling," says Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute which tracks color trends in the design world."In these tough economic times, one thing you can change is your immediate environment your clothing by adding color.
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By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | January 13, 2011
On the cusp of each new year, trend-setters usher in a hue that's expected to be the "color of the year. " For 2011, Pantone – the world-renowned authority on color — announced it had selected "honeysuckle. " The announcement was made a few weeks ago, but I don't go in much for fads, so I tried to ignore the news. Still, as a self-appointed arbiter of all things monumentally important — like trendy colors, for instance — I couldn't resist weighing in. Pantone, probably best known for creating a system to accurately identify and match color, more recently has taken on the task of trending colors for fashion and home, and each year presents the next "hot new color.
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff | January 17, 1999
Going to your head Headbands are back, but they're not the preppie accessories we knew as kids. The versions seen on spring runways are street-smart, sophisticated, sometimes precious works of art. Most often, they're defined by size. The newest are ultra-thin. And some, in fact, are so skinny they're made of bra straps. These bands play off the latest styles, easily sweeping hair off the forehead when the look is no-nonsense utility chic. Others, like Frederic Fekkai's (above)
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By Donna Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2010
Janice Mcculley smiles when she recalls the customer who came into her Bolton Hill hardware store, seeking a distinctive paint shade for his bar. "He wanted to paint it Ravens' purple," says Mcculley, whose family has owned Belle Hardware for 33 years. "So we custom-mixed a purple color. He just loved it. " With the NFL season underway, many Ravens fans are eager to show off their purple pride. Expect to see all manner of team memorabilia in basements, dens and family rooms across the region.
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By Donna Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2010
Janice Mcculley smiles when she recalls the customer who came into her Bolton Hill hardware store, seeking a distinctive paint shade for his bar. "He wanted to paint it Ravens' purple," says Mcculley, whose family has owned Belle Hardware for 33 years. "So we custom-mixed a purple color. He just loved it. " With the NFL season underway, many Ravens fans are eager to show off their purple pride. Expect to see all manner of team memorabilia in basements, dens and family rooms across the region.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | January 13, 2011
On the cusp of each new year, trend-setters usher in a hue that's expected to be the "color of the year. " For 2011, Pantone – the world-renowned authority on color — announced it had selected "honeysuckle. " The announcement was made a few weeks ago, but I don't go in much for fads, so I tried to ignore the news. Still, as a self-appointed arbiter of all things monumentally important — like trendy colors, for instance — I couldn't resist weighing in. Pantone, probably best known for creating a system to accurately identify and match color, more recently has taken on the task of trending colors for fashion and home, and each year presents the next "hot new color.
FEATURES
By Donna Larcen and Donna Larcen,Hartford Courant | December 2, 1993
Black, the color historically associated with funerals, clerics, ninja warriors, motorcycle gangs and urban bohemians, is now the top color for holiday fashion. Death takes a holiday? How did this happen?"We're in a depression," says J. T. Ghamo, who runs a tuxedo store in Hartford, Conn. "People are in a more conservative mood."In the 1950s, "black was the dress color we associated with Italian widows," says Mimi Cooper, president of the Cooper Marketing Group color forecasters in Oak Park, Ill. "Now it is the top holiday choice."
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By T.J. Howard and T.J. Howard,Chicago Tribune | March 18, 1992
TC Menswear has the blues. Colorwise, that is.Granted, nautical themes surface every spring in men's sportswear, but this year blue moves far beyond conventional navy. From azure to zaffer, blue hues for 1992 surface everywhere from raincoats to neckties.Conservative businessmen and sailing jocks are not to worry; there still is plenty of navy to go around.Attracting the most attention right now, though, are royal blue, aqua and teal -- pigments with more personality. "In suits, the big word is 'petrol,' which is a brighter mid-blue.
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By Jill L. Kubatko | March 8, 1992
Something old, something new -- MontrachetHere's a twist. If you can't afford to buy something old, you can always buy something new. A line of new furniture purposely designed to look like hand-me-downs from Aunt Sally's attic or Grandma's barn is arriving at the Towson Thomasville Galleries later this month.The line, called Montrachet, after a region in south central France, includes antique-looking furniture with details such as hand-painted, hand-rubbed finishes and old-fashioned planked tops.
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By Rose Mary Budge and Rose Mary Budge,San Antonio Express-News | December 15, 1994
An effort to remove red from the fashion palette would probably set off a firestorm of protest.Almost everybody likes the sizzling color -- especially apparel designers who use it to add spark to their styles. But precisely what makes red so appealing? What is the source of its remarkable strength? And does it really make our hearts beat faster and our pulses pound the way some people say, or is it just our imagination working overtime?"It's no myth -- fascinating things happen when women wear red," says Leatrice Eiseman, director of the Pantone Color Institute.
NEWS
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff | January 17, 1999
Going to your head Headbands are back, but they're not the preppie accessories we knew as kids. The versions seen on spring runways are street-smart, sophisticated, sometimes precious works of art. Most often, they're defined by size. The newest are ultra-thin. And some, in fact, are so skinny they're made of bra straps. These bands play off the latest styles, easily sweeping hair off the forehead when the look is no-nonsense utility chic. Others, like Frederic Fekkai's (above)
FEATURES
By Francine Parnes and Francine Parnes,AP Newsfeatures | June 19, 1991
This season's color story is looking on the bright side. It serves up a tropical punch of tutti-frutti hues. Fruit-flavored colors go head to toe, either monochromatically or in incendiary combinations.Not only do the splashy shades look good, they also provide instant feel-good."Brights have always psychologically created an up feeling," says Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute which tracks color trends in the design world."In these tough economic times, one thing you can change is your immediate environment your clothing by adding color.
NEWS
By JENN WILLIAMS and JENN WILLIAMS,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 25, 1999
This spring, the American Movie Classics network will air two programs that capture the link between film and fashion.Topics on "The Hollywood Fashion Machine" range from Tinseltown's love-hate relationship with Paris couture to a look at how studios used to mold stars both on and off the screen. Daryl Hannah will be the host of the first two episodes of this 13-part series, which airs Mondays at 7:30 p.m.Tomorrow's show focuses on legendary designer Edith Head. Following at 8 p.m. will be "The Hollywood Fashion Collection," in which Lauren Bacall introduces movies that have had a strong influence on fashion.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,Sun Staff | July 29, 2001
For those who are ready to move beyond organic gardens and organic diets, Rodale Press has published Organic Living, a primer on infusing organic principles into everyday life. With text by Michael Van Straten, a leading "alternative health guru" in Great Britain, and photographs by David Loftus, the book is a guide to green living -- from tips on natural beauty treatments and household cleaning products to finding attractive towels, bedding and clothing made from unbleached or naturally dyed organic cotton.
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