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NEWS
October 15, 2000
Editor's note: This is part one of a two-part series on learning disabilities. It will conclude with a column on dyslexia in two weeks. It is the second month of the school year, and by now you may have noticed that your child is having a hard time in school. Perhaps he can remember television ads but not his own telephone number. He has difficulty following multiple directions or constantly loses his homework. He misspells words and reverses letters when he writes. These hidden handicaps affect 10 percent of the population - 1 out of 5 children - according to researchers, who estimate the numbers may be even higher.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 21, 2014
I agree that those who care for people with disabilities should earn a living wage ( "Minimum wage debate ignores crucial group," Jan. 15). I have been a direct-care staff worker at the Athelas Institute in Columbia for more than 10 years, yet the new people coming in with no experience make almost as much as I do. I have had experience working with disabled people since I was 19, when my oldest son was born with learning disabilities....
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1995
William Ellis, a nationally recognized learning disabilities expert whose curiosity about why one of his students had difficulty learning led him to what became his life's work, will be honored at a memorial service at 2 p.m. Nov. 19 at the Stony Run Friends Meeting House, 5116 N. Charles St., in Baltimore.Mr. Ellis, who first taught at Friends School and later was the first director of its middle school, died Oct. 19 of cancer at Sloane-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. He was 55.He became a sixth-grade teacher and drama coach at Friends School in 1963, and, in 1968, became assistant headmaster of St. James School in Monkton, where he encountered a student who had difficulty learning to read.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2013
A star lacrosse player turned the world topsy-turvy Tuesday for a group of dyslexic middle schoolers. "It may be difficult for you guys to understand now, but a learning disability can be a gift," Paul Rabil told a gathering of about 100 students at the Jemicy School in Owings Mills. Rabil, 27, said his own struggles with auditory processing disorder in the classroom helped him on the athletic field, where he became a three-time first-team All-American midfielder at Johns Hopkins and, now, a standout with the Boston Cannons of Major League Lacrosse.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- Lovastatin, a widely used cholesterol-lowering drug, reverses common learning disabilities in mice, offering the first hope for a treatment of the problem in humans, University of California, Los Angeles researchers reported yesterday. Three human trials in children and adults will begin at UCLA and other U.S. and European locations within weeks, said Dr. Alcino J. Silva, a neurobiologist at UCLA and the lead author of a paper appearing in the journal Current Biology. Lovastatin, trade-named Mevacor, is one of a family of drugs known collectively as statins that have revolutionized the treatment of high cholesterol.
NEWS
By Liz Lean and Liz Lean,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 15, 1995
SYMPATHY IS EASY. Empathy is hard.A video and discussion designed to show nondisabled people the challenges faced by children with learning disabilities will be presented from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday at the Interfaith Center in Wilde Lake.The free program was produced by the FAT City Learning Disability Workshop, an acronym for Frustration, Anxiety and Tension. The video shows parents, teachers and friends of children with learning disabilities attempting activities that simulate perception challenges those children face.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
Professional guidance, personalized advice and in-depth information are just an e-mail message (or a toll-free phone call) away for parents and educators of children with learning disabilities.Through a Web site developed by the Schwab Foundation for Learning, computer technology is providing a nationwide Internet connection that gives the public a direct link to experts in the field of learning disabilities."What people really need is information and resources," said Ann Wallace, communications manager of the nonprofit Schwab foundation, which operates a learning disabilities resource center in San Mateo, Calif.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 31, 1998
In the latest and probably final chapter of a closely watched case testing how far universities must go to accommodate disabled students, a federal judge has ruled that Boston University did not have to allow liberal arts undergraduates with learning disabilities to substitute other courses for a two-year foreign-language requirement.The university said that allowing students to circumvent the requirement would fundamentally alter the nature of its program. No substitute course in the history, literature or art of another country, the university said, would give students the same "insider access" to another culture.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | November 8, 1992
The 10 children didn't really know what a learning disability was -- even though each of them has one -- until their "helping teacher," Randi Malamphy, explained it this fall."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2013
Eileen H. "Pat" van Breemen, an advocate for children suffering from learning disabilities and a Wicomico County political activist, died Tuesday, from multiple organ failures, at her Salisbury home. She had recently celebrated her 88th birthday. The former Eileen Barbara Hines was born and raised in Iowa City, Iowa, where she graduated in 1942 from Iowa City High School. Her father was a college professor, and her mother was a Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad telegrapher and a silent movie pianist.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
Boston Cannons midfielder Paul Rabil , a former All-American at Johns Hopkins, is hosting the second annual Paul Rabil Foundation Holiday Magic Gala on Thursday, Dec. 6 at Sammy's Trattoria Restaurant in Baltimore. Entertainment will be provided by Maryland Live Casino, and all proceeds will go to the Paul Rabil Foundation, which specializes in benefiting children with learning disabilities. The event, which runs from 7 p.m. to midnight, is open to those age 21 and older; it will include a silent auction, wine and martini tasting, and top-shelf open bar. The gala is black tie optional, and the total cost of the event is $125, covering the cost of production, with all other proceeds going to the Paul Rabil Foundation.
NEWS
August 21, 2012
What a joyful, uplifting story that greeted me as I read my morning paper on Friday! The front page story on artist Dylan Guest ("Baltimore County grad wins national art awards," Aug. 17) should serve as an inspiration to every child with a "different" learning style, every parent and every teacher looking forward or dreading the start of the school year. The struggles and hardships this obviously gifted young man has gone through and now has not only overcome but triumphed is amazing.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2011
Shortly after Norbel School in Elkridge closed in June, citing financial difficulties, many of the school's teachers, faculty and parents banded together to come up with a new school that, like Norbel, would serve children with learning disabilities. They secured the property of the former Ascension School in Halethorpe and chose to rent the facility. They formed a board of trustees, a staff and faculty, many of whom have ties to the former school. Everything was being put in place to launch the new school before Labor Day, just like other schools in the state.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
Norbel School, a private, nonprofit school in Elkridge for children with learning differences, will close July 1 because it has "insufficient enrollment and money to begin another school year," according to officials. The enrollment at the school, which served grades one through 12, has steadily declined over the past five years and this past year was 40 percent lower than five years ago, said Harry Siegel, attorney for the Norbel school board. Because of its struggles with enrollment and funding, the school's goal was to complete the academic year to allow seniors to graduate, officials said in a news release.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | May 30, 2009
The sun was bright and hot, but the waters of the Chesapeake Bay were icy as the Brendan Sail instructors launched a small sailboat at Annapolis Sailing School in Edgewater. "Yeee-oww," Riggs Brusnighan, 15, howled as he waded into the shockingly cold water to scrape off the winter's rust. Classes start soon in America's sailing capital, and there is no time to waste. They say every child who grows up in Annapolis should learn to sail, and there are probably enough sailing schools here to accommodate them all. But the Brendan Sail Training Program is different.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | October 26, 2008
There are learning and literacy centers throughout the state that cater to the general population. But people at The Highlands School in Bel Air wanted to meet a more specific need - for educational assistance for children and adults with learning disabilities. As a result, the Community Outreach Center for Literacy and Tutoring Program was recently started at the school. "We want to help the child who learns differently, or adults who want to improve their literacy skills," said Paula Moraine, director of the Community Outreach Center and Tutoring Program.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel | April 20, 2008
Distance runner Gabriel Lincoln-DeCusatis helped the Harford Tech outdoor track and field program grow rapidly in the past few seasons. But there's a lot more in the senior's life than track and field. Lincoln-DeCusatis likes politics and is interested in running for president one day. He just finished serving in the state's legislative page program in Annapolis during the session that recently ended. He has a 4.0 grade point average and is a member of the National Honor Society and the school's student government.
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