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Learning Bank

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BUSINESS
December 24, 1990
The Learning Bank, an adult literacy center in Southwest Baltimore, is seeking tax-deductible donations to equip an expanded computer lab.The organization is asking area businesses to contribute IBM PCs and IBM compatibles (except PC Juniors), or Apple models, in good condition. The Learning Bank can also use monitors, printers, "mice," keyboards and internal cards. For information, call The Learning Bank at 659-5452.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
Sister Mary Frieda Chetelat, a nun with the Sisters of Mercy who was admired for her talents as a teacher, her social activism and her relentless humor, died on March 3. She was 97 and had been in the order for seven decades, during which she also was a principal at two Baltimore schools and a teacher at several others. She was born Bernadine Mary Chetelat on Dec. 18, 1913, the first of Harry and Frieda Chetelat's 10 children, all of whom were born in the family's home on Lasalle Avenue in Baltimore.
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FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | October 22, 1995
SISTER MARY JUDITH Schmelz, director of the Learning Bank, "did" breakfast last Tuesday morning with former Gov. William Donald Schaefer and a large group of Baltimore business people. Sister Mary Judith, with $450,000 in matching state funds in hand, announced the Learning Bank's $3 million capital campaign.Mr. Schaefer was host of the literacy breakfast, which was highlighted by three students, Rosalind Hudson, Tony Beasley and Lavinia Thomas, who talked about their hopes for the future.
BUSINESS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | October 17, 2006
Dundalk High School junior Kayla Hylock opened a savings account during her lunch period two weeks ago. And she didn't have to leave school to do it. Dundalk High and First Financial Federal Credit Union of Maryland have teamed up to start what they and trade association officials call the first student-operated credit union in the Baltimore area. The Owl Branch opened Oct. 3 for students and staff in the cafeteria. It's a way for Dundalk High to address the low financial literacy of young people, something other schools are doing by adding personal finance courses.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Evening Sun Staff | September 10, 1991
THE TASK of learning to read and write for those who did not learn during the usual process of growing up is eased at The Learning Bank, where the door is wide open to those who want to learn.Stepping into the quiet, friendly atmosphere there, any uneasy embarrassment or lack of self-worth is lost as a kind and supportive staff and volunteers embrace this desire to learn.Located at 1223 W. Baltimore St., in a building donated by Maryland National Bank, the school is one of the most successful literacy programs in the city and has won acclaim as a model for programs around the country.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks | December 3, 1991
CURRENT volunteers' news and needs:The Learning Bank of Coil Inc. has received the Eleanor Touhey Smith ''Affiliate of the Year Award'' from the Literacy Volunteers of America, one of the largest national literacy support groups, according to its founder and director, Sister Mary Judith Schmelz. The award was presented during the LVA conference last month in Orlando, Fla. The award is sponsored by Kraft General Foods. For Learning Bank details and to volunteer, call 859-5452.House of Ruth needs volunteers for answering the hot line, counseling programs, legal clinic and other help necessary to operate the shelter.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | April 15, 1994
The "fun" was put back in fund-raising at last Sunday's Bowling for Scholars, where nearly 300 people filled 48 lanes at Towson Fair Lanes. Lainy LeBow-Sachs and Leonard Sachs spearheaded the day's activities, which raised more than $60,000 for The Learning Bank.On hand to cheer people such as Ed Porter from IBM, who rolled the highest score of the day with eight strikes in a row, were Doug Becker, CEO of Sylvan Learning Centers, sponsor of the event; Bob Embry, Abell Foundation, and his sculptor wife, Mary Ann Mears, and their four daughters; Otis Warren, Otis Warren Management Co.; Norman Taylor, United Way, and his wife, Bea; Tony Deering, Rouse Company; Walter Amprey, superintendent of Baltimore City Public Schools, and his wife, Freda; Jim Brady, CEO Arthur Andersen, who was last year's high scorer; and the Learning Bank's director, Sister Mary Judith Schmelz, who was pleased that so many had turned out to help her adult literacy center in southwest Baltimore.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | April 22, 1992
High rollers, take heed. There is still time for you to be a kingpin in the second annual Bowling for Scholars at the Towson Fair Lanes on Sunday. The action begins at 4 p.m., when Walter Amprey, superintendent of Baltimore City Public Schools, will get things started by rolling out the first ball.Carol and Arnie Kleiner, president and GM of WMAR-TV, are co-chairing this important fund-raising event, which they hope will make $30,000 for the Learning Bank's endowment fund. If you are not familiar with the Learning Bank, it is an adult literacy center in southwest Baltimore that offers tutoring, classroom instruction and computer-assisted instruction, free of charge.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1997
Teacher Steve Butz had a delightful problem the first day of school: There weren't enough chairs.He had 19 adult students, four more than expected for his second class of the day, a 10: 40 a.m. remedial reading and writing session. Before class could begin, he had to run to the computer lab to grab extra seats.Such are the problems of the COIL Learning Bank, Baltimore's largest private adult literacy program, which has seen demand for its services boom since moving three weeks ago from two nondescript rowhouses at 1223 W. Baltimore St. to new quarters across the road at 1200 W. Baltimore St. More than 200 people have enrolled for the current eight-week session, up sharply from the 150 students of a year ago."
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | April 9, 1995
"Twelve Monkeys" and a couple of movie stars had top billing at the Baltimore Zoo recently.Tony Award-winner Christopher Plummer and Golden Globe nominee Brad Pitt, in town filming Terry Gilliam's new movie, "Twelve Monkeys," spent half a day at the zoo for a photo session. Plummer was caged in one of the old hyena pens down the steps from the zoo mansion, while Pitt joined 30 extras in a sequence showing a group of animal activists demonstrating against the zoo.The film's other stars, Bruce Willis and Madeleine Stowe, have also been seen around town, and they cause quite a stir when RTC they are recognized.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | November 28, 2004
AS LONG AS we're talking about the crime of leaving children behind, we should consider the legacy of children left behind for decades. Many of these young adults know they made a big mistake when they left school. They want to go back, but there's no room in Maryland's shockingly underfunded adult education system. With children of all ages, it's a life and death thing. And right now we're on the death side of the scale. Is that too dramatic? We rank 46th in the nation in financial assistance for adult education.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1998
Viva Green, 31, of West Baltimore said she is determined to progress past a sixth-grade reading level to earn a high school graduate equivalency diploma.LeKescha Brooks, 22, of Northeast Baltimore said her daughter and a desire to increase her self-esteem motivated her to start reading lessons. She hopes to become a nurse.Loretta McClure, 49, said she was ready to go home and cry after finding a reading center -- West Baltimore's Learning Bank -- closed. "But, God says, don't quit. You came too far. So I waited at the Learning Bank until someone came."
NEWS
October 25, 1998
Area schools, libraries and literacy programs use volunteers to help children and adults improve reading skills.Among them are:Baltimore County Delta Community Outreach Center, 8503 Glen Michael Lane, Suite 103, Randallstown, for an after-school program for age 6 and older, working on reading, homework, computer skills and projects. Hours are 3: 30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact: Tanya Wade, 410-922-8655.Baltimore Reading Aides, 6200 Loch Raven Blvd., for one-on-one tutoring of adults learning to read or trying to improve reading skills.
NEWS
By From staff reports | January 12, 1998
TOWSON -- Christmas tree collections are to begin today at county curbsides and at three collection points, recycling officials said. Collections will end Jan. 31.Officials said the trees will be chopped into mulch, which will be ++ available free to county residents at all three recycling facilities Mondays through Saturdays.The three centers are Western Acceptance Facility at the end of Transway Road, off the 4500 block of Hollins Ferry Road, Halethorpe; Eastern Sanitary Landfill, 6259 Days Cove Road, off the 11500 block of Pulaski Highway in White Marsh; and at the county Resource Recovery Facility, Recycle Way, off the 10300 block of York Road in Cockeysville.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1997
Teacher Steve Butz had a delightful problem the first day of school: There weren't enough chairs.He had 19 adult students, four more than expected for his second class of the day, a 10: 40 a.m. remedial reading and writing session. Before class could begin, he had to run to the computer lab to grab extra seats.Such are the problems of the COIL Learning Bank, Baltimore's largest private adult literacy program, which has seen demand for its services boom since moving three weeks ago from two nondescript rowhouses at 1223 W. Baltimore St. to new quarters across the road at 1200 W. Baltimore St. More than 200 people have enrolled for the current eight-week session, up sharply from the 150 students of a year ago."
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | October 22, 1995
SISTER MARY JUDITH Schmelz, director of the Learning Bank, "did" breakfast last Tuesday morning with former Gov. William Donald Schaefer and a large group of Baltimore business people. Sister Mary Judith, with $450,000 in matching state funds in hand, announced the Learning Bank's $3 million capital campaign.Mr. Schaefer was host of the literacy breakfast, which was highlighted by three students, Rosalind Hudson, Tony Beasley and Lavinia Thomas, who talked about their hopes for the future.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | December 14, 1990
The main public service effort of Channel 11 (WBAL), a drive to improve education called Great Expectations copied from an extremely successful campaign by its Hearst-owned sister station in Boston, bears prime-time fruit Saturday night.Rod Daniels anchors "Stories of Success," five vignettes about educators and their programs that are working. Judging from the three available for preview, this is a solid effort, effective on both an emotional and intellectual level as it combines touching stories with substantive information.
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