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By Jeff Herring and Jeff Herring,Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 18, 1999
"If today were the last of all days ..."Marilyn Scott -- singerNo, this is not about Y2K. What it is about is designing and living the kind of life you want. Ask yourself the question posed by Marilyn Scott in the popular jazz song "If Today Were the Last of All Days." Would you:* Start the business you have always wanted to?* Take that trip you had always planned?* Heal an old hurt?* Forgive an old offense?* Visit someone who would love to see you?* Reconnect and catch up with an old friend?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Bonnie Rothman Morris and Bonnie Rothman Morris,New York Times News Service | April 23, 2001
When Patricia Adkinson Murphy retired five years ago as a church secretary in Pittsburgh, she had just learned how to use a word processor. Frankly, her experience with new technology so late in her career had not been a pleasant one. "I said to my sons, `I don't ever want to see another computer again as long as I live,' " said Murphy, 77. "It caused me a great deal of grief." Her four sons did not listen. Three years ago, they bought her a computer. Now, Murphy says she is so comfortable with it that she even "empties her cache" of cookies left from her Web wanderings.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | June 27, 1995
Q: Our 6-month-old son is active and eager to explore. He seems frustrated that he can't get around on his own. He often cries for toys that are out of reach. We'd like to put him in a walker, but our pediatrician says not to. What do you think? Wouldn't he learn more and end up smarter?A: Walkers are dangerous. Babies ride them down stairs or off porches. They tip them over into water or onto fireplaces or furnace grates. Each year, 35,000 children are brought to emergency departments with walker-related injuries, and 7,000 of those injuries are serious.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | May 7, 2003
The 1,100 children who attend Pointers Run Elementary School gladly traded their more rigid math, English and history lessons Friday for something a little more on the creative side: art workshops. Led largely by National Art Honor Society students from Mount Hebron and River Hill high schools, the children got the chance to explore a variety of societies and themes through visual media at the daylong Art Extravaganza. "They learn certainly about different cultures," said Lisa Huriaux, the art teacher at the school in charge of organizing the 12-year-old annual event.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | January 5, 1992
Ask any working woman what she most needs in the New Year and she's likely to say "time and money" -- in that order. Here are ways to make time for yourself in 1992:*Stop being a slave to the telephone. This is a machine. It should work for you. Use your secretary or an answering machine to screen calls at work and both an answering machine and willing family members at home.Also learn to say -- often! -- "I can't talk to you right now. I'll have to call you back."*Re-evaluate your objectives.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 3, 2006
Sam Tepelides lined up his shot, took a couple of practice swings and then smacked the golf ball out into the open. "That was better, Sam," PGA professional Bill Cullum said. "But you need to get the club head into the grass. We're grass killers." A few minutes later, Cullum gave the 10-year-old Bel Air boy a resounding high-five and then moved on to his next pupil. Sam was among more than 30 children who, despite the scorching heat, are participating in the Junior Golf Academy this week at Gunpowder Falls Golf Course in Kingsville.
NEWS
March 14, 1999
In recent years, the market for educational learning materials and games has been deluged with software products for children. Products for very young children (3- to 7-year-old range) vary dramatically in quality, but many are highly rated and have received awards. One of the newer interactive adventures is the "Living Books" series from Broderbund. These are storybooks of about 12 pages. The stories are read aloud and phrases are highlighted for the child to follow along. In addition to the reading, the story pages contain objects that are activated when clicked upon.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr | February 1, 1992
The Rev. Clayton Bywaters sees two worlds when he stands outside his church in Northwest Baltimore.In one world he sees unemployed young men and women idling on porches and street corners in pockets of the neighborhood around Liberty Heights Avenue and Garrison Boulevard, a neighborhood doused with crime, drugs and despair.But in the other world, one that is slowly coming into focus in the same neighborhood, he sees scores of new workers, once unemployed and considered unemployable, rehabilitating area houses.
NEWS
October 24, 2001
PLATES AND QUAKES Get shaken up at the Southern California Integrated GPS Network at http: / / scign.jpl.nasa.gov / learn / . This site specializes in the use of space technology to study earthquakes. Some beginning geophysics will help explain how plates slide all over the Earth's surface. Then check out the Space Technology at Work section for cool info about earthquakes. GPS isn't just for navigating your car. It also helps measure crustal changes of the Earth. Finally, the Activities section features challenging projects that illustrate the principles found in each section of the site.
NEWS
March 7, 1998
Give kids enough time to learnBecause we know some children learn faster than others, can we reasonably expect "Reading by 9" for all children ("Same goal, different speeds," Feb. 22)?Education is currently organized around an "average" learning speed, which, by definition, is too slow for some and too fast for others. Those who learn more quickly are accommodated with enrichment, gifted and advanced academic programs, and then with A's and B's.Those who learn more slowly, if they do not have a "handicapping condition," which qualifies them for special education services, are doomed to what can only be termed "programmed failure"; they are dragged along at a speed that at best provides only exposure and results in ever-widening learning gaps.
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