Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLearn To Read
IN THE NEWS

Learn To Read

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2001
MUTUAL - Phyllis Keefe is no ordinary reader. Curled up on the couch beside her 6-year-old daughter, she cracks open a children's book and launches into a dramatic monologue that transforms "Bravo, Amelia Bedelia!" into a one-act play. She laughs, mimics voices, makes sweeping gestures. Yet the story doesn't unfold seamlessly. Every few pages, she stops to point out an illustration or to ask Meghan a question or two. For Keefe, who wants to make sure her little girl shares her love of the written word, it's a small but significant change in reading style - something she learned after going back to school.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 15, 2008
'Reading First' helps build skills The Sun's editorial on the Reading First program jumped to unfounded conclusions and buried the most important point ("Reading failure," May 7). While calling for the program to be "overhauled or scrapped," the editorial also noted that Maryland educators say the program has helped students improve - and it clearly has. Indeed, Maryland's program evaluation for this plan stated that "student achievement is improving in Reading First schools, in all grades and [districts]
Advertisement
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1999
LOUISA C. MOATS HAS heard the heresy so many times she's sick of it: Teaching reading is easier than teaching mathematics or science because most children develop the skill naturally and easily, the way they learn to speak.She begs -- passionately -- to disagree, and at the request of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), she has produced a little primer for anyone interested in the fundamental skill on which all education depends. Moats' booklet is called "Teaching Reading IS Rocket Science."
NEWS
By Jason Perkins-Cohen | March 21, 2005
JOHNNY CAN'T READ. Neither can his parents, and if they are in school trying to learn to read, government is about to tell them to go home and not bother. One in five adult Marylanders reads at less than a fourth-grade level. This means they can't understand simple directions or locate an intersection on a map. Another 25 percent of the state's adults read below eighth-grade level. This means they are not yet able to prepare for General Educational Development or help their children learn to read.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 4, 1999
LIKE ANY 12-YEAR-OLD, Sarah Brintnall doesn't want her mother hanging around when she ventures to sixth grade this fall at Baltimore County's Pine Grove Middle School -- her first experience with the big kids in the scary land beyond elementary school.Smiling, Sarah spells out the message in 2-inch letters on her computer screen: "My mom is banned the first month."Sarah, who has cerebral palsy, cannot speak or handle a pencil or crayon. But she can read, says her mother, Ruth, and she can write by tapping her head against a red, cloth-covered switch attached to the headrest of her wheelchair that serves as a mouse.
NEWS
By Nancy Knisley and Nancy Knisley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 2000
At a small private school on the grounds of a golf course in Annapolis, kindergarten children with ties to the Navy are learning to read using an original curriculum with a British pedigree. The Naval Academy Primary School (NAPS) - a pre-K through fifth-grade school mainly serving children of staff and military personnel at the Naval Academy - uses a phonics-heavy curriculum devised by a teacher looking to apply the best of what she saw in British reading instruction. The results, school officials say, are impressive.
NEWS
August 19, 2001
"You need to know if your children are reading. ... We must make sure the mind-set that says certain children cannot learn to read is eradicated all across America." President George W. Bush, on his plan to require annual testing in the nation's schools
NEWS
March 1, 1998
Area schools and literacy programs use volunteers to help children and/or adults learn to read or improve reading skills. Among those in need of volunteers:St. Ambrose Family Outreach Center, 3445 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore. Tutors are needed to work one-on-one in basic reading and General Educational Development preparation for adults or in an after-school program for children. Contact: Sister Kathleen Boland, literacy coordinator, at 410-225-0870.Lillie Ross Learning Center, 2109 McCulloh St., Baltimore, needs tutors for a program offering one-on-one tutoring for adults and elementary and middle school students.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2002
G. Reid Lyon has dubbed illiteracy a national health problem and is leading the charge against it. Yesterday, the scientist many educators know as President Bush's "reading czar" urged teachers in Carroll County to be ever vigilant about the needs of the individual child. "We have to realize that education has to take on the same importance as medicine," said Lyon, in a speech at Winters Mill High School in Westminster. "Teachers are the best brain surgeons around, the best at developing the nervous system."
FEATURES
March 24, 1999
Reading WorkshopCalifornia has adopted a new Reading/Language Arts Framework for kindergarten through 12th grade, which will be released late this spring and which is designed to provide a blueprint for organizing the public school reading curriculum and instruction. As one of its guiding principles, the framework emphasizes that children must be fluent readers at least by the end of third grade, which is in accord with The Sun's Reading by 9 point of view.Many of the ideas outlined in the framework are already being tried in schools across the country, but some of these topics still have areas of concern.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 11, 2004
WHEN GOV. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. took off his sport coat and sat on a rail in a Towson University lecture hall Tuesday, I figured I was in for a treat. No, not because of the brouhaha between the governor and this paper that has been going on for weeks. That will probably be resolved soon, perhaps even without any faces being punched or noses being broken. I was there so that -- in the event that Ehrlich said anything right -- I'd be able to report it. And he said plenty that was right.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2004
The faces of the teenagers gathered inside the crowded gym at John Carroll School in Bel Air were mostly white, faces of descendants of German, Italian, Polish and Irish immigrants who settled a century ago in Baltimore, prospered, and moved to the country. They are kids who grew up in what seem the most ordinary ways, who spent their days playing as 4-year-olds, learning to read by the time they reached school. This summer, they all read a book about someone who had a very different sort of childhood, whose parents had a very different sort of immigrant experience.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2002
G. Reid Lyon has dubbed illiteracy a national health problem and is leading the charge against it. Yesterday, the scientist many educators know as President Bush's "reading czar" urged teachers in Carroll County to be ever vigilant about the needs of the individual child. "We have to realize that education has to take on the same importance as medicine," said Lyon, in a speech at Winters Mill High School in Westminster. "Teachers are the best brain surgeons around, the best at developing the nervous system."
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2002
FLORA, Miss. - James and Sally Barksdale raised hopes and eyebrows two years ago when they committed $100 million to help the children of their native state learn to read. Today, there is evidence that the Barksdale money is changing the way reading is taught in Mississippi. But progress is slow. And the Barksdales, who made a fortune in the Internet boom, are finding that starting a public-school reading program can be more difficult than running a billion-dollar corporation. "There are still a lot of educators in Mississippi who think learning to read is a matter of self-discovery," says Claiborne Barksdale, James' younger brother, who gave up his job as a corporate lawyer to run the Oxford-based Barksdale Reading Institute.
NEWS
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Special to the Sun | March 3, 2002
Editor's Note: This is the final installment of Just for Parents. The feature has been part of the Sun's 5-year campaign to fully examine and encourage reading by youngsters. The campaign began in 1997. When the "Reading by 9" project was initiated by the Sun five years ago, there was a great deal of controversy in the field of education about the best ways to teach children to read. Learning to read is a journey beginning with identifying letters and words, leading to the interpretation and appreciation of print.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 2002
At a glance, it seems fairly innocuous. A visitor conducts a children's program about quilts at the Savage library. She reads a story, discusses quilting patterns and helps youngsters make quilt blocks using colored paper and glue. She throws around pattern names with the deftness of Martha Stewart - the bear paw, the Ohio star, the nine patch. But you notice that her shirt is emblazoned with a National Security Agency logo. And as you listen to her discuss each pattern, you realize that, like the quilts themselves, there is more to this bee than meets the eye. Jennifer Wilcox, assistant curator of the NSA's National Cryptologic Museum, went to the Savage library last week to talk about the hidden meanings stitched into 19th-century quilts used by slaves to aid their escape via the Underground Railroad.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.