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NEWS
March 28, 2010
The Annapolis Rowing Club is accepting registration for this year's classes. The club offers courses in sweep rowing in eight-person shells with coxswains. Those interested can choose from among six sessions, each consisting of four two-hour lessons given from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturdays and Sundays on two consecutive weekends. Classes are geared to those with no rowing experience and are limited to 16 people. Participants must be 14 or older. Cost is $190. Sessions begin April 17 and continue weekends through July 17-18.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Zimmerman | October 6, 2014
For the past 30 years, I've been urging my students to put themselves in the shoes of people who lived in the past. So why do we make fun of Americans who do that as a hobby? I'm talking about military re-enactors like Eric Frein, the 31-year-old man suspected of killing a police officer and wounding another at a state police barracks in northeastern Pennsylvania last month. A few weeks into the manhunt for Mr. Frein, news organizations reported that he played a Serbian soldier - "Istocni Vuk," he called himself - in a unit that re-creates Eastern European armies from the Cold War era. Mr. Frein studied Serbian and Russian languages and even smoked Serbian cigarettes, as investigators discovered when they searched his home.
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NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | July 17, 2010
Most Americans are introduced to a foreign language in a school setting. Of course, you can always spend a lot of money on a special computer program, a series of CDs or DVDs, or an exchange program to become fluent. Or, you can simply try the Janet's World Vehicular Immersion System of language learning, administered absolutely free through your car's GPS system. Yes, in just three weeks, you can become proficient in directional conversation. Imagine impressing your friends with the phrase: "In 300 feet, exit right" in Vietnamese!
NEWS
By David Hanlin | October 2, 2014
Comptroller Peter Franchot, by starting a petition drive, has embarked on a policy initiative to require all Maryland public schools start the school calendar after Labor Day. His policy proposal is given political cover through a commission report from the "Task Force to Study a Post-Labor Start Date for Maryland Public Schools. " That commission report is flawed, and I believe misguided. It will have deleterious consequences that have not been fully considered. The tagline for his campaign, "Let Summer Be Summer," speaks volumes.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | April 7, 1999
If you're worried -- or just wondering -- if you or a loved one drinks too much, tomorrow you'll be able to find out. Free of charge and with absolute anonymity.All you have to do is show up at one of hundreds of centers nationwide for the first National Alcohol Screening Day.At these sites -- which include hospitals, clinics and colleges -- participants can learn from talks, videos and booklets about the dangers of alcohol abuse and about treatment. They can complete a written questionnaire to better understand whether they have a drinking problem.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 25, 1991
Chincoteague, Va. -- You spend a week at the beach cooking, eating, bobbing in the ocean, and you learn some things.You learn the difference between a cobbler and a betty. A cobbler has the sweetened crust on top of the fruit. A betty has layers of fruit and crust.This distinction becomes useful when you have polished off one bowl of the peach-mango ecstasy and want another. If, when praising the dish to the heavens and asking for seconds, you call it a "cobbler," you get corrected. You might even get referred to the source of the dessert and the distinction, "Cobblers, Crumbles & Crisps," by Linda Zimmerman and Peggy Mellody ( Clarkson Potter $11)
NEWS
April 22, 2001
Advice and strategies to help your children read Editor's Note: Today Jerdine Nolen talks about the usefulness of lists. Walk into Any Classroom, U.S.A., and you are going to find all kinds of lists on display. Listing things is something we do to help us think and learn. Because lists are an itemized series of things, they can be an effective thinking tool to help us organize our thoughts. Or they can allow us to recall or access information quickly and easily. Lists are short, informative and attention-getting.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 21, 1992
RIDGEWOOD, N.J. -- While the debate over the study of Western Civilization rages among the dons from Columbia to Stanford, Philip Dogon remains steadfast in his teaching goals: to help even the clumsiest homeowner learn to rewire a lamp or repair a toilet.He does this in nine Tuesday nights at the Ridgewood Community School in course No. 502: "Be Your Own Fix-It Handyman, It's Really Easy." His specialty is one of about 170 courses or lectures this fall in this suburb's version of a perennially popular form of learning, the adult education program.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1998
The Jemicy School is full of children like Julie Kuhn. IQ well above average. Attended a top public school in the Baltimore area. But couldn't learn to read.Three years after switching to the Owings Mills private school for dyslexics, the 12-year-old from Ellicott City is devouring the children's novel "Julie of the Wolves."The student-teacher ratio at Jemicy is 3-to-1, and tuition costs $17,500 a year. But there's no magic to the results: Jemicy uses a teaching method called Orton-Gillingham that has been saving dyslexic children from academic disaster since at least the 1950s.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | January 29, 1995
If you're searching for an indoor play area for your children this winter, try the Chesapeake Children's Museum, nestled between Bruegger's Bagels and Be Beep Toys in the Festival at Riva shopping center in Annapolis.The museum "is both a place and a reason for families to get together and enjoy each other," said its founder, Dr. Deborah Wood.The museum's half-dozen exhibit rooms are dedicated to the proposition that children can learn best by doing, said Dr. Wood, a Cape St. Claire child development specialist.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The rigor required to create a Nantucket lightship basket puts the lie to any cheap jokes about learning the craft. “If these baskets are made perfectly,” says Leslie Goldsmith, “they should be able to hold water.” Consumers today associate the baskets “with the oval purses and a lid,” Goldsmith says. But she and her fellow weavers in the Nantucket Basket Guild are drawn to the historical legacy and precision of the craft. “These baskets are made the same way sailors made them in the 1800s,” she says.
NEWS
By David Horsey | September 30, 2014
One chilly winter evening in 1988, I was the lone journalist among a small clump of voters gathered inside an old meeting hall in Manchester, N.H. I was there, mostly out of curiosity, to witness the spectacle of a man desperately clinging to a shattered dream. The dream was the presidency. The man was Gary Hart. Mr. Hart had once been sure it was his destiny to be president of the United States. The previous spring -- perhaps convinced of his own inevitability and invulnerability and only weeks after declaring his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination -- Mr. Hart had taken a ride to Bimini on a yacht called "Monkey Business" accompanied by a young model named Donna Rice.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
With Towson featuring nine new starters on offense and five on defense, many expected this year's team to be a much different group from last season's squad that advanced to the Football Championship Subdivision title game. That difference is especially stark when considering how the 2014 Tigers have struggled to finish off opponents. While last year's team won 11 of 12 games in which it had the lead or the score was tied after three quarters, the current squad has lost two of three games in which it had the advantage or the score was tied heading into the final period.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
As a tropical cyclone churned the Atlantic Ocean this month, a drone watched from above, dropping a paper-towel-roll-sized set of sensors attached to a parachute through the clouds on a 20-minute, 10-mile journey. The instruments revealed dry air low in the storm's center - something scientists from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center suspect was the nascent eye of Hurricane Edouard. The storm went on to become the Atlantic's first to reach winds of more than 110 mph since Sandy in 2012, though it never threatened the United States.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
No parent wants to be in a position to use it, but child-safety experts agree that learning infant and child CPR is a must for every mother and father. "It's one skill that just doesn't come naturally to caregivers. It's a learned technique," says Lanny Dowell, Greater Baltimore Medical Center's parent education and doula coordinator. Courses are offered by many local hospitals and through the American Red Cross. First aid for choking is also taught in CPR classes. And some are combined with training on using defibrillators or with adult CPR. While parents can watch a video for instruction, it's helpful to practice on a mannequin, experts say. "Most people learn by doing," says Sarah Sherman, training center coordinator for the American Heart Association at Howard County General Hospital in Columbia.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
A Baltimore judge this week ruled to allow city prosecutors to withhold identifying witness information from defendants in the sweeping case against alleged members of the Black Guerrilla Family gang. Judge Sylvester B. Cox on Tuesday granted a protective order, requested by the state's attorney's office, on any materials that could expose witnesses to harm or intimidation, after hearing a detective describe the fears witnesses had about cooperating with the investigation. Forty-eight suspects accused of being members of the BGF gang, which operated a violent, widespread drug trade in the city and corrupted the Baltimore City Detention Center, were indicted last November.
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley | July 29, 1992
Pitching is a science not easily perfected. In fact, it probabl never has been, and never will be, perfected -- there are too many ways to fail.Not even a living legend, 45-year old Nolan Ryan of the Texas Rangers, has perfected the craft. The eternal flamethrower has posted a major-league record seven no-hitters and over 5,600 strikeouts, but his won-loss record is just over .500.In 26 seasons in the big show, Ryan has 319 victories, good for 12th on the all-time list. But for most of his career, he has been a .500 pitcher.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | October 17, 2000
Parents are certain that if their children simply follow their footsteps in the snow, the path will be warm and easy to navigate. Learn from our mistakes, we say. Follow our instructions. We grew up once; we know where the traps are. Our advice will keep you safe. We want our children to learn from our mistakes. We want to spare them the discomfort of their own bad judgment. We want to rescue them from its consequences. And we are wrong, of course. That's the primary lesson to emerge from "Field Guide to the American Teenager," a new book from Michael Riera and Joseph Di Prisco.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 13, 2014
After reading Chris Davis' apologetic statement on his suspension from the Orioles for taking a drug he wasn't allowed to take under the rules of Major League Baseball, I had to look up the word "mistake. " A "mistake" is what Davis said he made. His manager, an Orioles broadcaster and a teammate used the word as well. "I made a mistake by taking Adderall," Davis said. "We all make mistakes," said Buck Showalter. "The big boy made a mistake," said Joe Angel, one of the voices of the Orioles on radio.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Morgan State nearly made Lee Hull's debut as head coach a memorable one, but the Bears fell short in a 31-28 loss to Eastern Michigan on Saturday night. A three-point defeat to a Football Bowl Subdivision program might normally be viewed in a favorable light, but the Bears, who play in the Football Championship Subdivision, aren't looking for moral victories. “They were upset because they thought they were the better football team,” Hull said of his players Tuesday morning during his weekly conference call organized by the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference.
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