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NEWS
December 9, 1995
THE PROJECTIONS by state planners are alarming: Population of the Chesapeake Bay region is expected to grow by 7 percent over the next three decades. But the amount of developed land in Maryland will increase by 100 percent in that period.Developmental sprawl continues to eat up farm and forest lands, creating demands for expensive public services, while older communities and suburbs see an exodus of population and jobs, leaving behind vacant or underused wasteland.Maryland's 1992 Growth Management Act was to address this wasteful sprawl by directing new development to areas of existing communities (away from environmentally sensitive areas.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee | April 18, 2012
No. 17 Washington's 13-11 loss to No. 13 Gettysburg Saturday night gave the Bullets sole possession of first place in the Centennial Conference. But all is not lost for the Shoremen. Washington (8-3 overall and 5-1 in the league) can still capture the regular-season conference title and top seed and homefield advantage in the Centennial Conference Tournament. The Shoremen must beat Swarthmore (4-8, 1-4) Wednesday night at home and then take care of Ursinus (5-7, 1-4) April 28. Meanwhile, Gettysburg (9-3, 5-0)
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2004
Sylvan Learning Center has been described as "the McDonald's of tutoring." Now parent company Educate Inc. is aspiring to be the Starbucks of tutoring, too. The Baltimore corporation said yesterday that it - like the ubiquitous coffee seller - plans to expand into big-box stores and other retail locations so that children can learn while their parents shop. It will join with LeapFrog Enterprises Inc. of Emeryville, Calif., a maker of educational toys that opened a pilot learning center this year in a Wal-Mart store in Louisiana.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS | November 4, 2008
I'm as big a fan of messing up the Bowl Championship Series every season as anyone, so nobody was rooting harder for Texas Tech to beat Texas on Saturday in Lubbock than me. But jumping the Red Raiders from seventh to second in the BCS rankings - over unbeaten and idle Penn State? Do those voting in the various BCS polls disrespect the Big Ten that much? Or was it just another computer malfunction, since it was reportedly the computer polls that did in the Nittany Lions by placing them fourth in that category?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2001
Leapfrog sends television signals through phone lines Do you have one cable or satellite box and three TVs? No problem. Just "leapfrog" the signal to another room, using your home phone line wiring. Terk's Leapfrog HomeNetwork is a remarkably simple way to send video and sound from one room to another, allowing you to watch cable or satellite channels on a television that isn't hooked up to a box or a wall jack. You also can use it to send the picture from your DVD player, VCR or camcorder to a TV on the other side of the house.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Lynn Anderson and Alec MacGillis and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
The Prince George's school board launched a new probe of schools CEO Andre J. Hornsby last night after his girlfriend left an education software company she worked for after its inquiry into the handling of a $40,000 commission paid in a recent sale to the county. LeapFrog SchoolHouse announced yesterday that it is no longer employing Sienna Owens, who was living with Hornsby when he approved the $1 million purchase in June, and another saleswoman, Debora Adam, who was assigned to the sale.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2005
Education software purchased by Prince George's County - in deals now under state and federal investigation - has been dogged by repeated glitches and delays, leaving many of the materials underused for months, according to e-mails between school officials and the software companies. The U.S. attorney's office, the Maryland state prosecutor and a forensic auditor hired by the county school board are scrutinizing deals approved last year by schools chief Andre J. Hornsby, including a $1 million purchase from LeapFrog SchoolHouse, a company that employed his live-in girlfriend, and a deal with another company, Plato Learning, that had paid for his trip to South Africa the year before.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | November 4, 2006
The former live-in girlfriend of the ex-schools chief in Prince George's County pleaded guilty to a tax charge in federal court yesterday, admitting that she and Andre J. Hornsby schemed to share the profits from a contract that he allegedly steered. The charge against Sienna Rochelle Owens, 28, involved her failure to declare as taxable income the commission that she received from a technology contract with the county school system. After articles in The Sun questioned his administration of one of the nation's largest school districts, Hornsby, 53, was indicted in August on charges of mail and wire fraud, witness and evidence tampering, and obstruction of justice.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2005
The Prince George's County school board was briefed behind closed doors yesterday morning on the results of a six-month audit it commissioned into dealings involving education vendors and the district's former chief, who resigned last weekend. The former superintendent, Andre J. Hornsby, has 48 hours to respond to the audit under an agreement reached between him and the board at the time of his resignation, which also included a $125,000 severance payment. The board is then expected to make the report public tomorrow afternoon.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2004
When Prince George's County public schools made a $1 million software purchase from LeapFrog SchoolHouse in June, schools CEO Andre J. Hornsby did not disclose his close personal relationship with a company saleswoman. Hornsby lives with LeapFrog employee Sienna Owens in Mitchellville, but he did not reveal that to school board officials at the time of the purchase, which Hornsby presided over. The contract, which did not require bidding, used federal funds to buy early-literacy and assessment software for low-income kindergarten students.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | November 4, 2008
It's a shame that you can't major in whining at Penn State, because if you could, I contend it would be like getting a law degree from Harvard or an engineering degree from MIT. You'd be immediately recognized as the cream of your profession. Few things in college football annoy me more than when fan bases kvetch about their place in the Bowl Championship Series rankings before the season even ends, but the grouchiness has already begun in Happy Valley after Texas Tech leapfrogged the Nittany Lions with its upset of Texas this past weekend.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN REPORTER | July 24, 2008
After four years of investigations, two trials and a determined effort by federal prosecutors, former Prince George's County schools Superintendent Andre J. Hornsby was found guilty yesterday of six of the 22 counts of corruption with which he was charged. Hornsby, 54, was acquitted of two charges, and the jury deadlocked on the remaining 14. He was released pending sentencing on Oct. 20, when he could face a maximum of 90 years in prison. But Hornsby will most likely be sentenced to considerably less, perhaps a dozen years or more.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | November 30, 2007
It's not quite up there with the classic of the genre, the she-set-me-up tape that captured then-D.C. Mayor Marion Berry smoking crack in a hotel room. No, the gotcha tape of Andre J. Hornsby pocketing $1,000 from a government contractor in a room at the Bowie Comfort Inn isn't quite so dramatic. In fact, it's the casualness of the scene - the former Prince George's County schools superintendent actually says "whatever" when the contractor tries to confirm how much more she owes him for steering government business her way - that is the most remarkable thing about it. Another day, another thou.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | October 26, 2007
Sienna Owens, the ex-girlfriend of Andre J. Hornsby, the indicted former head of the Prince George's County school system, went to considerable lengths to hide a $20,000 commission she was to receive for a sale of educational materials to the county, a former colleague of hers testified in Hornsby's trial yesterday. Prosecutors have accused Hornsby, who joined the school district in 2003 and resigned two years later amid questions about his behavior, of accepting half of Owens' commission as a kickback.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | November 4, 2006
The former live-in girlfriend of the ex-schools chief in Prince George's County pleaded guilty to a tax charge in federal court yesterday, admitting that she and Andre J. Hornsby schemed to share the profits from a contract that he allegedly steered. The charge against Sienna Rochelle Owens, 28, involved her failure to declare as taxable income the commission that she received from a technology contract with the county school system. After articles in The Sun questioned his administration of one of the nation's largest school districts, Hornsby, 53, was indicted in August on charges of mail and wire fraud, witness and evidence tampering, and obstruction of justice.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,sun reporter | September 6, 2006
GREENBELT -- A federal judge barred former Prince George's County schools Superintendent Andre J. Hornsby yesterday from contacting any current or former employees of the school system where he is alleged to have engineered a financial scheme to enrich himself. Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael R. Pauze asked Magistrate Judge Charles B. Day for the restriction. Hornsby's lawyer Robert C. Bonsib called the restriction overly broad, and government officials said later that they might tailor the order to affect a more limited number of employees.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2004
The head of the Prince George's County schools faces an ethics inquiry and state legislators are calling for additional action in response to questions raised by CEO Andre J. Hornsby's dealings with education software companies. Chairwoman Beatrice P. Tignor said yesterday that the school board has asked the system's ethics panel to conduct an inquiry into Hornsby's participation in a 10-day trip to South Africa in the summer of 2003 with the National Alliance of Black School Educators.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,sun reporter | September 6, 2006
GREENBELT -- A federal judge barred former Prince George's County schools Superintendent Andre J. Hornsby yesterday from contacting any current or former employees of the school system where he is alleged to have engineered a financial scheme to enrich himself. Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael R. Pauze asked Magistrate Judge Charles B. Day for the restriction. Hornsby's lawyer Robert C. Bonsib called the restriction overly broad, and government officials said later that they might tailor the order to affect a more limited number of employees.
TOPIC
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2005
SPIRITS WERE high at the cocktail party thrown last November at an educators conference at a deluxe hotel in Dallas. The reception was hosted by the education software company LeapFrog SchoolHouse, and among those in attendance were the company's president, the head of Prince George's County schools, and the school chief's girlfriend, a saleswoman for the company. Questions had been raised in Maryland about the superintendent's dealings with the company, but no one was letting that get in the way of the party.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2005
The Prince George's County school board was briefed behind closed doors yesterday morning on the results of a six-month audit it commissioned into dealings involving education vendors and the district's former chief, who resigned last weekend. The former superintendent, Andre J. Hornsby, has 48 hours to respond to the audit under an agreement reached between him and the board at the time of his resignation, which also included a $125,000 severance payment. The board is then expected to make the report public tomorrow afternoon.
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