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By Samuel L. Banks | November 2, 1994
MOST POLITICAL pundits, despite political affiliation, predict that Marion Barry will again be elected mayor of Washington on Tuesday.Among factors in his favor: Democrats far outnumber Republicans and Mr. Barry's political wizadry in the primary, including his ability to organize young voters, makes him a shoo-in for the general election against Republican Carol Schwartz.Since Mr. Barry's return from prison for possession of an ounce of cocaine, he has been followed very closely by the media and the public.
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NEWS
March 17, 2014
Leo Bretholz was easily one of the finest human beings of our time ( "Leo Bretholz, Holocaust survivor, dies," March 10). Having lived to be 93, God had certainly granted Leo the gift of years. However, he had accomplished - and was continuing to accomplish - so much that benefited so many that one tended to think he would live forever. He will be mourned by his family first and foremost, by his friends, his neighbors, his fellow Holocaust survivors and the hundreds of people with whom he shared his story in person and in his thrilling book, "Leap into Darkness.
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FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | March 27, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- "If you cast wrong, it's not an easy day," said director Barry Levinson, who with Oliver Stone and Barbra Streisand addressed a recent Directors Guild of America seminar. During the course of the 2 1/2 -hour discussion, Mr. Levinson shared some of the agonizing that went into casting Oscar nominees for "Bugsy."Mr. Levinson said that he was "amazed" at the number of people who turned down various roles in "Bugsy." The part of gangster Meyer Lansky, in fact -- for which Ben Kingsley received a best supporting actor Oscar nomination -- wasn't filled until a week before the shoot.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | August 22, 2012
Starting this school year, everyone from cafeteria workers to custodial staff will be evaluated and paid based on their performance, under what union and city school officials call a first-of-its-kind contract for operations staff in the country. After two years of negotiations, the 1,110 employees represented by the Local 44 chapter of theAmerican Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees(AFSCME) signed on to a new, five-year-deal that will tie their performance to compensation.
FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | October 31, 1994
Kurt Russell has been playing the Hollywood game for 28 of his 43 years, and he says he can smell a loser movie the minute he walks on a set.Before he walked onto the set of "StarGate," the sci-fi thriller that opened Friday, he said he was filled with the usual amount of anxiety that comes with making any film. But there was added tension because it was a big-budget movie with special effects."The script doesn't tell you what the special effects are really going to be like or how much they're going to spend on those effects," the actor said.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 27, 2002
Isn't she adorable? That's how we're supposed to feel by the end of the pilot for Leap of Faith, NBC's latest attempt at finding a post-Friends, Thursday night sitcom that people will stay tuned to out of something other than inertia. Just in case you hadn't thought of it, one character makes that observation for us near the end of tomorrow's pilot after the leading character, 32-year-old Faith Wardell (Sarah Paulson), explains how she Crazy Glued her finger to her forehead. Personally, I don't find Faith adorable.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 1, 2001
Over the years, Katana Lazet Hall repeatedly considered entering the annual competition for black playwrights sponsored by Arena Players and WMAR-TV (Channel 2). But she never did. She was teaching theater and writing at various colleges around town and didn't want to compete with her students, whom she encouraged to participate. Then a year ago, Hall gave up teaching to start an independent film and video company called A Leap of Faith Productions. This time she decided to give the playwriting contest a shot.
NEWS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,Sun Staff | July 20, 1999
William T. Qualler sat in a mock F-22 cockpit aboard a Boeing 757 high over the Maryland coast.The flying laboratory was testing the radar system for the new F-22 Raptor fighter jet, and Acting Secretary of the Air Force F. Whitten Peters was watching intently over Qualler's shoulder.But there was nothing to see."OK, I just lost 'em," Qualler said, searching in vain for two blips on the F-22 radar screen. "The radar went down. Doggone it. We're not giving you guys a very good show here."Qualler and other Boeing Co. technicians finally got the radar working that April morning, and Peters assured them he was not troubled by the slip.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2005
The board of directors for the Westminster Community of Shalom will have to take a leap of faith if construction of a community center at the western end of the city is to begin this year. The group meets Tuesday to decide whether to move forward with the $1 million project on Union Street, even if not all of the money is in hand. The group has raised $775,000, a sum that includes a $450,000 state grant, which could be lost if ground is not broken soon. "Everything is a leap of faith.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 16, 1992
Steve Martin, who plays a charismatic and mendacious con-man evangelist in his latest movie, "Leap of Faith," says he has mixed feelings about the men who employ sleight-of-hand in the name of the Lord."
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
Just what is this little cub up to? Good thing its mama is there to catch him or her. The spectacled bear, just four months old, was playing at the zoo in Cali. (Tremarctos ornatus), born in captivity four months ago, is seen with its mother at the zoo in Cali Zoo in Colombia.
NEWS
December 1, 2011
Sorry, Virginia, there is no contractual sanity clause for those who serve in Congress. Once again, the clock is ticking for Washington to fashion a compromise over legislation that would both stimulate the economy and provide tax relief to middle-class Americans. President Barack Obama's proposed payroll tax reduction sure would make a nice Christmas gift (or New Year's Eve surprise), but how many of us expect to take delivery within the next 30 days? If recent history is any guide, probably not too many - even among the most optimistic young Virginias of the world.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
If you happen to be a Ravens season-ticket holder, Wednesday marks the deadline where you and your bank account have to decide just how important it is to retain those season tickets in 2011, despite the fact that little progress has been made between the NFL Players Association and the league's owners as they try to reach a new labor agreement. Full payment on all season tickets is due Wednesday, a deadline the franchise feels is necessary to continue operating their business effectively.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 24, 2011
"When the bells ring and tell the world I'm taking your hand/Folks from all over will come and see the wedding we've planned. " — The Intruders There is something about a wedding. There is the finery and the formality, of course, the dress with the long train, the tux with the bowtie that pinches, the speaking your heart and making your promises as everyone you ever knew stands witness. There is, as well, the sense of ritual, the timelessness of ceremony that traverses and unites generations.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | January 28, 2011
If you're still up in the air about what you're going to do on Saturday to celebrate the first weekend without NFL football since August -- and, no, I don't count the Pro Bowl -- there are a couple of big events that you might want to choose between. The Orioles are holding their annual FanFest at the Baltimore Convention Center, so you could go there and warm up for spring training by rubbing elbows with most of the players on the 2011 roster. There will be autograph sessions and panel discussions and memorabilia and even some advance ticket sales, which should make for a pretty full day for your average highly resilient O's fan. I'll be there, just in case the Orioles spring another FanFest surprise on us like they did when they agreed to terms with Miguel Tejada a year ago. Vladimir Guerrero is still out there, so you never know.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID ZURAWIK | September 24, 2009
Just when you thought network TV had given up making new expensive, serial dramas, along comes ABC's "FlashForward" tonight at 8. And it is as compelling a new series as you going to see this fall. It's smart, richly textured, complex and filled with suspense and intellectual challenge - in short, it has all the things network television is supposed to have abandoned in favor of cheap reality shows. And you know what? I wouldn't be surprised if it is gone by March. "FlashForward" feels too much like the crop of a dozen richly textured, complex serial dramas with titles like "Vanished," "Kidnapped" and "The Nine" that debuted in the fall of 2006 and crashed and burned by midseason in one of the most expensive bonfires of network vanity in decades.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | November 8, 2006
All that was missing was the purple fingers. Lines stretched out the doors in some cases as voters swarmed over the polls yesterday. The lines were that unusual combination of long and happy. They were long not because the voting machines malfunctioned, but because so many people wanted to vote on them. They were long because a lot of people had a lot to say this year: about the war in Iraq and the schools in Baltimore, about stem cell research and about negative campaigning, about many and varied things but perhaps foremost among them the right to vote itself.
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,sandra.mckee@baltsun.com | September 3, 2008
Sitting on a folding chair under a shade tree in Druid Hill Park on a warm afternoon, Donna Lawrence watched her son Desmond McCant practice with the St. Frances football team. What she was looking at was a dry, dusty field with 48 athletes listening intently to a volunteer coaching staff. It is St. Frances' version of a field of dreams. The school, known for its highly successful boys and girls basketball programs, is fielding a football team for the first time. "This football team has really helped my son," said Lawrence, who was joined on the hillside by a small group of parents.
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