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Leap Day

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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | February 29, 2008
On Leap Day 2000, Mary Durning and Ben Burnet got another gift, besides their 6-pound, 10-ounce baby girl. Left for them in the maternity ward at Howard County General Hospital was a long-stemmed red rose and a handwritten note from a stranger that read: "Congratulations on your `leapie!' I, too, am a leapie and I am `13' today. Please know that you have a very `special' baby." It was signed "Linda Potsiadlo, Columbia." "I have kept the note all these years," said Durning, who displays it on a page in her daughter's scrapbook with other Feb. 29 trivia.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 29, 2012
Happy Leap Day. We're carpaying this extra diem, how about you? For its Leap Day celebration , B&O Brasserie is offering 29-cent National Bohemian beers and house-made pretzels with stout-cheddar sauce on Leap Day from 5 to 7 p.m. Anyone who checks in on Facebook with two or more other people for dinner will receive 29 percent off food. All guests at the table must order dinner. Down in Fells Point, Kooper's is offering $2.90 Yellow Tail Ale, and its sister restaurant, Slainte , is offering $2.90 Heavy Seas Classic Lager.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Blum and Michael Blum,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
Victoria Brownworth wrote here last week, "Magical is how critics have described Gilbert and Sullivan's comic opera The Pirates of Penzance. Act 1 opens on leap day 1897 with Frederic, an indentured young pirate, turning 21 and thus free from his indenturing. But as the plot progresses (with some of the most hilarious lyrics in the history of musical theater), it becomes known that Frederic, a leaper, has actually passed only five birthdays and a little more, and thus he must desert his love, Mabel, whom he asks to wait for him (neither seeming to have actually calculated the 60-odd years it will take for him to celebrate the remaining 16 birthdays)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2012
Allie Hammond turns 28 Wednesday, when she can celebrate her actual birthday. It's a bright spot in what can be an annoying circumstance - being a "leapling. " Take renewing your driver's license. "They could not find a code for my birth date," said Hammond, an athletic trainer at Wilde Lake High School. She said the experience took hours. "Leaplings," or those born on Feb. 29, often find themselves explaining the oddity of a quadrennial birth date to the Department of Motor Vehicles, corporate America and bartenders.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Staff Writer | February 29, 1992
Listen up, all you shy, love-sick folks of the female persuasion, today is leap day.You know. Sadie Hawkins Day when it's OK to take the initiative and ask for the hand of that man you adore. We know, we know. It's really OK for you flirtatious women to pop the question any day of the year. It's equally OK for all you manly guys to be on the receiving end of the marriage proposal.Or as an advocate of women's rights put it: "We've come a long way since Sadie Hawkins ran out of Dogpatch," said Pat Riviere, a Maryland legislative representative for the National Organization for Women.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2012
Allie Hammond turns 28 Wednesday, when she can celebrate her actual birthday. It's a bright spot in what can be an annoying circumstance - being a "leapling. " Take renewing your driver's license. "They could not find a code for my birth date," said Hammond, an athletic trainer at Wilde Lake High School. She said the experience took hours. "Leaplings," or those born on Feb. 29, often find themselves explaining the oddity of a quadrennial birth date to the Department of Motor Vehicles, corporate America and bartenders.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2004
As the birth of his first child approached, city police Detective T.C. McGowan watched the calendar and puzzled through the consequences of what would happen if his daughter was born Feb. 29. That date rolls around once every four years, during leap years. So would that mean birthdays only once every fourth year? Would the law prohibit her from driving until she is 64, drinking until she is 84? Even as an overprotective father, McGowan thought that would be a bit too much. But then his wife, Mindy, gave birth to tiny, blue-eyed, brown-haired Kalie McGowan at 8:44 a.m. yesterday, on the dreaded leap day. While she was in labor at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, she told her husband that she had a plan for dealing with the birthday quandary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | February 29, 2004
It's not some New Age metaphor or Taoist riddle. We all learned the rhyme in elementary school -- it was one of those catchy little ditties like "I before E, except after C, or when sounding like A, as in neighbor and weigh." Thirty days hath September, April, June and November. All the rest have thirty-one, though February's underdone with twenty-eight -- hold the line! Leap Year makes it twenty-nine. Thus, as with any other astronomical anomaly, like Halley's Comet or a solar eclipse, this very day -- leap day -- won't come again for another four years.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | February 29, 2008
Mary Durning recalled her obstetrician's reaction in June 1999 after consulting a chart that calculates a pregnant woman's delivery date. "She said, `Wow, your baby is due on Feb. 29.' So I asked, `What's the big deal?' She answered it was just that my child wouldn't have an actual birthday most years if I were to deliver on Leap Day," said the Ellicott City resident. Eight years ago today, Durning did just that. She and her husband, Ben Burnet, welcomed Ani into their lives at Howard County General Hospital about 3 a.m. on her due date, just as predicted.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | March 1, 2008
Shannon Radebaugh went into labor Thursday, but not in time to deliver her baby girl until midnight had passed. "I was hoping at first that it was not going to be a Leap Year baby," she said yesterday as she nursed daughter Heidi in their room at Mercy Medical Center. "I guess the big thing is, when do we celebrate her birthday?" By the afternoon, however, Mom was seeing things a little differently. "She knew she was destined to be a star," Radebaugh said. "She wanted to come into this world with a bang."
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | February 25, 2012
When Duncan Ferrin turned 3, his family took him out for dinner and then joined him for a fun game of laser tag. Plans are still up in the air for his fourth birthday this coming Wednesday, but the Century High School sophomore knows it will be fun. "We'll do something special," Ferrin said. While it's technically only his fourth actual birth date, Ferrin will be celebrating his 16 birthday, too. Ferrin's birthday falls on Feb. 29, a day that only occurs on calendars every four years — leap year.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | March 1, 2008
Shannon Radebaugh went into labor Thursday, but not in time to deliver her baby girl until midnight had passed. "I was hoping at first that it was not going to be a Leap Year baby," she said yesterday as she nursed daughter Heidi in their room at Mercy Medical Center. "I guess the big thing is, when do we celebrate her birthday?" By the afternoon, however, Mom was seeing things a little differently. "She knew she was destined to be a star," Radebaugh said. "She wanted to come into this world with a bang."
NEWS
February 29, 2008
Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer got us thinking about that extra day in the calendar during leap year - that would be today - and the possibility of breaking free from the constraints of daily life. The mayor urged Annapolitans to reflect on the gift of an extra 24 hours and not waste it. Consider taking another 10 minutes for lunch, she said. But why be stingy? If we've got an extra day, let's take it. Why not make leap day an official holiday? Heck, it only comes once every four years.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | February 29, 2008
On Leap Day 2000, Mary Durning and Ben Burnet got another gift, besides their 6-pound, 10-ounce baby girl. Left for them in the maternity ward at Howard County General Hospital was a long-stemmed red rose and a handwritten note from a stranger that read: "Congratulations on your `leapie!' I, too, am a leapie and I am `13' today. Please know that you have a very `special' baby." It was signed "Linda Potsiadlo, Columbia." "I have kept the note all these years," said Durning, who displays it on a page in her daughter's scrapbook with other Feb. 29 trivia.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | February 29, 2008
Mary Durning recalled her obstetrician's reaction in June 1999 after consulting a chart that calculates a pregnant woman's delivery date. "She said, `Wow, your baby is due on Feb. 29.' So I asked, `What's the big deal?' She answered it was just that my child wouldn't have an actual birthday most years if I were to deliver on Leap Day," said the Ellicott City resident. Eight years ago today, Durning did just that. She and her husband, Ben Burnet, welcomed Ani into their lives at Howard County General Hospital about 3 a.m. on her due date, just as predicted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Blum and Michael Blum,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
Victoria Brownworth wrote here last week, "Magical is how critics have described Gilbert and Sullivan's comic opera The Pirates of Penzance. Act 1 opens on leap day 1897 with Frederic, an indentured young pirate, turning 21 and thus free from his indenturing. But as the plot progresses (with some of the most hilarious lyrics in the history of musical theater), it becomes known that Frederic, a leaper, has actually passed only five birthdays and a little more, and thus he must desert his love, Mabel, whom he asks to wait for him (neither seeming to have actually calculated the 60-odd years it will take for him to celebrate the remaining 16 birthdays)
NEWS
February 29, 2008
Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer got us thinking about that extra day in the calendar during leap year - that would be today - and the possibility of breaking free from the constraints of daily life. The mayor urged Annapolitans to reflect on the gift of an extra 24 hours and not waste it. Consider taking another 10 minutes for lunch, she said. But why be stingy? If we've got an extra day, let's take it. Why not make leap day an official holiday? Heck, it only comes once every four years.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | February 25, 2012
When Duncan Ferrin turned 3, his family took him out for dinner and then joined him for a fun game of laser tag. Plans are still up in the air for his fourth birthday this coming Wednesday, but the Century High School sophomore knows it will be fun. "We'll do something special," Ferrin said. While it's technically only his fourth actual birth date, Ferrin will be celebrating his 16 birthday, too. Ferrin's birthday falls on Feb. 29, a day that only occurs on calendars every four years — leap year.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2004
As the birth of his first child approached, city police Detective T.C. McGowan watched the calendar and puzzled through the consequences of what would happen if his daughter was born Feb. 29. That date rolls around once every four years, during leap years. So would that mean birthdays only once every fourth year? Would the law prohibit her from driving until she is 64, drinking until she is 84? Even as an overprotective father, McGowan thought that would be a bit too much. But then his wife, Mindy, gave birth to tiny, blue-eyed, brown-haired Kalie McGowan at 8:44 a.m. yesterday, on the dreaded leap day. While she was in labor at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, she told her husband that she had a plan for dealing with the birthday quandary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | February 29, 2004
It's not some New Age metaphor or Taoist riddle. We all learned the rhyme in elementary school -- it was one of those catchy little ditties like "I before E, except after C, or when sounding like A, as in neighbor and weigh." Thirty days hath September, April, June and November. All the rest have thirty-one, though February's underdone with twenty-eight -- hold the line! Leap Year makes it twenty-nine. Thus, as with any other astronomical anomaly, like Halley's Comet or a solar eclipse, this very day -- leap day -- won't come again for another four years.
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