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April 19, 1992
Seventy-five years ago this month, the United States entered "the Great War" and thereby entered the world. Until that moment, the nation had assiduously followed George Washington's advice in avoiding "entangling alliances," especially with the nations of Europe. But no longer. The die was cast. America's destiny as a world power, first signaled in its war with Spain a generation earlier, was not to be denied.President Woodrow Wilson decided on U.S. involvement, after many German provocations, on the supposition that an Allied victory would make the world "safe for democracy."
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FEATURES
February 13, 2006
Feb. 13 1795: The University of North Carolina became the first U.S. state university to admit students with the arrival of Hinton James. 1914: The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers was founded. 1920: The League of Nations recognized the perpetual neutrality of Switzerland.
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FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1997
Theodore Marburg, who lived most of his life in his townhouse at 14 W. Mount Vernon Place, had been an outspoken proponent of world peace and had lived to see the founding of the United Nations rising out of the failure of the League of Nations.Marburg was an internationally renowned exponent of world peace and former U.S. ambassador to Belgium, author, art collector, proponent of city parks and founder of the Municipal Art Society.Most afternoons, this quiet, slender and elegant man who favored brown suits and soft brown hats, could be seen casually strolling Charles Street, with cane in hand.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | September 23, 2002
"What happens in the Security Council more closely resembles a mugging than either a political debate or an effort at problem-solving." -- Jeanne Kirkpatrick WASHINGTON -- The United Nations is one of those institutions, like the Women's National Basketball Association, that sails above its failures because it just seems like a good idea to so many people. Despite its corruption, bias, indolence and waste, the United Nations retains so much moral authority that former President George H.W. Bush felt he had to appeal to it to get Democrats to authorize the gulf war in 1991.
FEATURES
February 13, 2006
Feb. 13 1795: The University of North Carolina became the first U.S. state university to admit students with the arrival of Hinton James. 1914: The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers was founded. 1920: The League of Nations recognized the perpetual neutrality of Switzerland.
NEWS
By RUTH WEDGWOOD | February 8, 2000
IT WASN'T JUST whistling "Dixie." The "grand geste" of Richard Holbrooke, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, in recently staging a personal appearance by U.S. Sen. Jesse Helms, a Republican from North Carolina, before the U.N. Security Council seems to have lifted the mood in U.S.-U.N. relations. International lawyers initially were perturbed. The Security Council is not Hyde Park Corner, open to anyone with an opinion. Delegates who appear are assumed to be stating national policy.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | September 27, 1994
TOKYO -- Japan's Foreign Minister Yohei Kono goes before the U.N. General Assembly today to state Japan's wish to become part of the Security Council, the United Nations' most powerful body, whose members hold veto power over all significant action.The appearance will provide many here with a deeply desired revision of Japan's place in the world. Yet it will also place new demands on Japan and, some Japanese fear, rekindle old problems.Surveys by newspapers and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs indicate that more Japanese favor admittance than oppose it. Japan's financial contribution to the United Nations will soon exceed the combined total of four of the five permanent members on the Security Council.
NEWS
April 25, 1995
Creation of the United Nations was one of the great achievements of World War II. Since then, it has often disappointed. But there has been no World War III.The League of Nations was designed after World War I with American influence to keep the peace. The Senate rejected ratification, the U.S. stayed out and the League was dead in two decades. Throughout the terrors of World War II, most Americans believed there would have to be something better.The 26 nations that allied after Pearl Harbor signed a "Declaration by United Nations" on Jan. 1, 1942, and the name was born.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | June 3, 1993
Paris. -- The impulse of the Clinton administration in foreign policy is toward withdrawal, a justified withdrawal in terms of the domestic interests of the United States.Whether this is in its general interest is another question, since the shift in American policy described by the imprecise and by now overworked term neo-isolationism presumes an international structure strong enough to tolerate an American withdrawal. This does not exist today.Under Secretary of State Peter Tarnoff says that a larger share of the United States' not unlimited resources are needed for domestic reconstruction.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | June 29, 1995
Paris -- The United Nations has survived 50 years. The League of Nations lasted only 20 years, before world war broke out a second time, and was all but moribund politically after Japan's and Germany's withdrawal in 1933, and Italy's successful defiance of the League's economic sanctions in 1935 (imposed because of the Italian invasion of Ethiopia).Both the League and the U.N. were founded on the illusions that an assembly of governments could be better than its parts, and that an organization largely composed of non-democracies could by some alchemy become (as Tennyson put it)
NEWS
September 13, 2002
Exerpts of President Bush's speech to the United Nations yesterday: We meet one year and one day after a terrorist attack brought grief to my country, and to the citizens of many countries. Yesterday, we remembered the innocent lives taken that terrible morning. Today, we turn to the urgent duty of protecting other lives, without illusion and without fear. ... The United Nations was born in the hope that survived a world war - the hope of a world moving toward justice, escaping old patterns of conflict and fear.
NEWS
By RUTH WEDGWOOD | February 8, 2000
IT WASN'T JUST whistling "Dixie." The "grand geste" of Richard Holbrooke, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, in recently staging a personal appearance by U.S. Sen. Jesse Helms, a Republican from North Carolina, before the U.N. Security Council seems to have lifted the mood in U.S.-U.N. relations. International lawyers initially were perturbed. The Security Council is not Hyde Park Corner, open to anyone with an opinion. Delegates who appear are assumed to be stating national policy.
NEWS
July 27, 1998
U.S. puts self-interest ahead of principle on world criminal 0) courtThe U.S. delegation's performance at the recently concluded International Criminal Court Conference and The Sun's July 22 editorial, "World court proposal is deeply flawed," are shameful and deplorable examples of American exceptionalism.In Rome, the U.S. delegation argued unsuccessfully for the idea that U.S. citizens should stand outside of the evolving framework of international law so that our government can pursue its policies with impunity, unhindered by the rule of law that other democratic nations accept.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1997
Theodore Marburg, who lived most of his life in his townhouse at 14 W. Mount Vernon Place, had been an outspoken proponent of world peace and had lived to see the founding of the United Nations rising out of the failure of the League of Nations.Marburg was an internationally renowned exponent of world peace and former U.S. ambassador to Belgium, author, art collector, proponent of city parks and founder of the Municipal Art Society.Most afternoons, this quiet, slender and elegant man who favored brown suits and soft brown hats, could be seen casually strolling Charles Street, with cane in hand.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | June 29, 1995
Paris -- The United Nations has survived 50 years. The League of Nations lasted only 20 years, before world war broke out a second time, and was all but moribund politically after Japan's and Germany's withdrawal in 1933, and Italy's successful defiance of the League's economic sanctions in 1935 (imposed because of the Italian invasion of Ethiopia).Both the League and the U.N. were founded on the illusions that an assembly of governments could be better than its parts, and that an organization largely composed of non-democracies could by some alchemy become (as Tennyson put it)
NEWS
April 25, 1995
Creation of the United Nations was one of the great achievements of World War II. Since then, it has often disappointed. But there has been no World War III.The League of Nations was designed after World War I with American influence to keep the peace. The Senate rejected ratification, the U.S. stayed out and the League was dead in two decades. Throughout the terrors of World War II, most Americans believed there would have to be something better.The 26 nations that allied after Pearl Harbor signed a "Declaration by United Nations" on Jan. 1, 1942, and the name was born.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | September 23, 2002
"What happens in the Security Council more closely resembles a mugging than either a political debate or an effort at problem-solving." -- Jeanne Kirkpatrick WASHINGTON -- The United Nations is one of those institutions, like the Women's National Basketball Association, that sails above its failures because it just seems like a good idea to so many people. Despite its corruption, bias, indolence and waste, the United Nations retains so much moral authority that former President George H.W. Bush felt he had to appeal to it to get Democrats to authorize the gulf war in 1991.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | March 25, 1991
A new order in which ''nations recognize the shared responsibility for freedom and justice'' -- as President George Bush puts it -- poses questions: Which nations, What justice?The American approach to the matter remains divided. There is an unavowed tradition of American Realpolitik, to which Mr. Bush would until now have seemed to belong. This says that governments run the world and must be dealt with whatever their character. Mr. Bush has insisted upon keeping good relations with China's despite its repression of domestic dissent.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | September 27, 1994
TOKYO -- Japan's Foreign Minister Yohei Kono goes before the U.N. General Assembly today to state Japan's wish to become part of the Security Council, the United Nations' most powerful body, whose members hold veto power over all significant action.The appearance will provide many here with a deeply desired revision of Japan's place in the world. Yet it will also place new demands on Japan and, some Japanese fear, rekindle old problems.Surveys by newspapers and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs indicate that more Japanese favor admittance than oppose it. Japan's financial contribution to the United Nations will soon exceed the combined total of four of the five permanent members on the Security Council.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | June 3, 1993
Paris. -- The impulse of the Clinton administration in foreign policy is toward withdrawal, a justified withdrawal in terms of the domestic interests of the United States.Whether this is in its general interest is another question, since the shift in American policy described by the imprecise and by now overworked term neo-isolationism presumes an international structure strong enough to tolerate an American withdrawal. This does not exist today.Under Secretary of State Peter Tarnoff says that a larger share of the United States' not unlimited resources are needed for domestic reconstruction.
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