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By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- With soaring rhetoric in praise of the political pamphleteer in American history, the Supreme Court cut back yesterday on the government's power to ban anonymous campaign literature.The 7-2 decision settled one aspect of anonymous leafletting, saying the Constitution protects it when it is done by individuals in local elections. But the ruling left in doubt whether other forms of political literature that omit their source will get such protection.If lower courts note the broad language used by the majority, and apply it literally, the ruling could threaten laws in all but one state and several federal laws, which require those who pass out campaign materials or advertise to identify themselves.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2013
About 9 a.m. Saturday, Bonny Eisenbise strode up to a man outside a Giant supermarket in North Baltimore. "We're trying to get guns off the street," she told him, offering a yellow flier that asked in bold type: "Haven't we had enough gun violence?" "Yeah, I'm with you," said the shopper, David Kehoe, who promised her that he would call his state delegate. With that, Eisenbise scanned the parking lot, looking for more recruits in a last-minute lobbying push to support Gov. Martin O'Malley's gun control bill, which would ban the sale of assault-type rifles and require a license to purchase a handgun, among other changes.
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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | November 8, 1994
Members of the Ku Klux Klan have dropped hundreds of leaflets in Annapolis, most of them in black neighborhoods, threatening to be back in town this weekend and suggesting they're ready for a more violent confrontation.Police say a resident reported seeing dozens of leaflets being dropped from a moving, white Oldsmobile Cutlass about 2 a.m. Saturday on Copeland Street near Bywater Road, a mostly black neighborhood.Leaflets were also found near the Banneker-Douglass black history museum on Franklin Street and at a corner near the home of Alderman Carl O. Snowden, a civil rights activist, city police said.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
In the weeks leading up to the Maryland gubernatorial election in 2006, the campaign of then-Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.commissioned and distributed "voter guides" which were, in fact, filled with misinformation. The leaflets falsely implied that Mr. Ehrlich and Republican Senate nominee Michael Steele were Democrats and that they were endorsed by popular Democratic leaders including Kweisi Mfume and Wayne Curry. Four years later, Mr. Ehrlich's campaign manager, Paul Schurick, commissioned robocalls on Election Day in 2010 in primarily African-American districts, informing voters that the Democrats had already won and that they should stay home.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2003
Defying police orders to stop putting campaign literature on cars, supporters of mayoral candidate Andrey Bundley slipped fliers under the windshield wipers of cars owned by several city employees yesterday during a rally outside Baltimore police headquarters. Bundley, who is challenging Martin O'Malley in the Sept. 9 Democratic primary, was handcuffed and charged with a misdemeanor Sunday night for putting fliers on cars. Such leafleting is illegal, but the law is seldom enforced. At a news conference outside police headquarters yesterday, Bundley said officers had no justification to handcuff him for doing what politicians have done for years.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | July 29, 1992
WASHINGTON -- As soon as a federal judge ruled that the National Treasury Employees Union staffers may pass out leaflets at Social Security Administration headquarters in Woodlawn, the union applied for a permit to distribute leaflets there.The General Services Administration, which manages federal buildings, and SSA have 10 days to respond.U.S. District Judge Joyce Hens Greene's Friday decision goes into effect despite the appeal, so the union could be passing out leaflets in Woodlawn by early August.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1999
In response to Ku Klux Klan leaflets that have been distributed throughout Ellicott City for the past five or six weeks, an Annapolis-based coalition of churches and peace groups is planning to visit Main Street Sunday to promote unity and equality.Ten to 20 members of the Unity Now Coalition will visit Main Street between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. to hold signs and pass out leaflets promoting peace, said George Law, an organizer."We don't feel there's a whole lot of room for such a degree of hatred in this day and age in this society," said Law, a member of Unity-by-the-Bay in Severna Park, a nondenominational church.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
Howard County police escorted a small group of anti-nuclear demonstrators from the main gate of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Fulton yesterday.Police said 16 members of the Baltimore Emergency Response Network (BERN) and a Washington group called the Dorothy Day Catholic Worker assembled at APL's east gate about 7 a.m. to hand out leaflets to laboratory employees as they walked from the parking lot to the main building.The demonstrators, who were objecting to weapons research at the laboratory, were read the county's statute about trespassing and were asked to leave the laboratory's grounds, police said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2003
The weather was warm, but the reception at Baltimore's Inner Harbor was chilly yesterday for two dozen peace activists who turned out to distribute leaflets urging an end to the United States' involvement in Iraq. Sharon Kangas, 57, of Bel Air angrily took one of the group's leaflets and tore it up. "I support [President] Bush; I think he's doing a fabulous job," she said. Describing Bush as "a Christian who listens to God," she said that if he hadn't gotten rid of Saddam Hussein, "10 years from now my daughter would be fighting them in our country."
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 30, 2007
BAGHDAD -- One of Iraq's most popular broadcasters narrowly escaped assassination yesterday, the latest target in a string of attacks against journalists in the country. Amal al-Mudarris, 58, a Baghdad radio veteran whose career began more than 25 years ago, suffered serious head injuries when she was shot multiple times outside her home yesterday morning. Doctors said later in the day that her condition had stabilized and that she was expected to recover. Mudarris, whose broadcasts before and since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion helped calm millions of listeners, had publicly voiced fears that she might one day fall victim to violence.
NEWS
June 3, 2011
Thank you very much for the editorial about my recent experience with police at the Inner Harbor ("Free Speech in the Inner Harbor," June 2). Just to be clear: My friends and I, all Baltimore citizens, were simply providing information to Inner Harbor visitors about the fact that eating meat violates an ethical principle in which almost all Americans believe — compassion toward animals. According to Gallup, 96 percent of Americans believe that animals should be legally protected from cruelty.
NEWS
June 1, 2011
To most visitors, Baltimore's Inner Harbor looks like an appealing mix of shops and waterfront attractions. But to anyone trying to exercise their rights of free speech, it can be a hostile maze governed by a patchwork of rules. If you demonstrate or distribute leaflets at the "wrong" spot, you could be ordered to leave and threatened with jail. That is what happened recently to Bruce Friedrich. He and fellow members of an animal rights group handed out leaflets one recent Sunday on a pedestrian bridge between the power plant and the National Aquarium — what looks to all the world like a public sidewalk on public property — only to be threatened with arrest by a city police officer and ordered to leave the harbor.
NEWS
May 31, 2011
I'm writing regarding your Saturday, May 28th front page news article titled "Harbor leafleting flap raises First Amendment questions. " As one who fiercely guards and treasures my First Amendment rights, I want to commend Bruce Friedrich and his six like-minded friends who on Sunday, May 22nd, believing they were exercising their First Amendment protected rights, handed out leaflets near the National Aquarium at the Inner Harbor. That security guards asked them to leave, and a Baltimore police officer threatened to arrest him, was astonishingly reprehensible and came perilously close to unconstitutionality.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2011
Bruce Friedrich, a teacher and a member of an animal-rights group, wants people to eat vegetarian. And so last Sunday he and six like-minded friends handed out more than 1,000 leaflets near the National Aquarium at the Inner Harbor. Their attempt to educate tourists and shoppers about their cause lasted about an hour. Security guards asked them to leave. Friedrich, who lives in Remington, said a Baltimore police officer threatened to arrest him, and even pulled out his handcuffs. The ninth-grade teacher at Baltimore Freedom Academy, a city charter school, was unwittingly caught up in a pitched battle over what can be said, how it can be said and where it can be said at Baltimore's premier waterfront attraction.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Rushdi Abu Alouf and Richard Boudreaux and Rushdi Abu Alouf,Los Angeles Times | January 11, 2009
Israeli aircraft pounded Hamas targets in the Gaza Strip yesterday and scattered leaflets warning of an escalation in attacks, but there was no sign that its forces had begun a major advance on the militant group's urban strongholds. A senior Hamas commander and seven members of a Palestinian family were among those killed on the 15th day of Israel's thundering assault, which also damaged a hospital. Palestinian militants fired 15 rockets into Israel, wounding three people. Diplomatic efforts to end the fighting sputtered as Egypt rebuffed a proposal to place international forces along its border to help prevent weapons-smuggling into Gaza.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 30, 2007
BAGHDAD -- One of Iraq's most popular broadcasters narrowly escaped assassination yesterday, the latest target in a string of attacks against journalists in the country. Amal al-Mudarris, 58, a Baghdad radio veteran whose career began more than 25 years ago, suffered serious head injuries when she was shot multiple times outside her home yesterday morning. Doctors said later in the day that her condition had stabilized and that she was expected to recover. Mudarris, whose broadcasts before and since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion helped calm millions of listeners, had publicly voiced fears that she might one day fall victim to violence.
NEWS
By Michael James, Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell and Michael James, Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1999
Just days before the city's mayoral primary, thousands of racist leaflets began appearing on the street corners of Baltimore exhorting white voters to support the candidacy of City Councilman Martin O'Malley to save the city from "Blacks and Jews."Attached to each handout is a letter signed by Robert L. Clay Sr., an African-American businessman who claims to have intercepted the hate-filled diatribe purportedly from a group calling itself the Aryan Blood Brotherhood."I'm not necessarily interested in tarnishing anyone's candidacy," said Clay, who paid to duplicate and distribute thousands of copies of the letter.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 2002
BAGRAM AIR BASE, Afghanistan - Taliban and al-Qaida fighters are offering bounties of up to $100,000 for the killing or capture of American soldiers and other Westerners, American officials said yesterday. The rewards, offered on leaflets that American officials claim are being passed to villagers in eastern Afghanistan, are among the "credible threats" against American soldiers and other Westerners here, officials said. Among the others, the officials said, are rocket and mortar attacks and car bombs.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 21, 2004
SOME OF the friends of Albert Carmine Isella assembled this week at Sabatino's Restaurant in Little Italy to sing him a chorus of "Happy Birthday." The great man turns 90 today. This will come as stunning news to odds makers of all manner, who cannot imagine so many years filled with so much breathless sporting action, and so much hectic pursuit by police. It's been a 90-year blur of a life, and continues with Al still greeting each new morning with his motor working overtime. We should all have his energy, and his zest for the good time, if not his arrest record.
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