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By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Writer | June 18, 1994
Interest and membership in the NAACP has surged in the wake of the recent national black leadership summit sponsored by the Baltimore-based civil rights group, Executive Director Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. said yesterday."
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NEWS
By Jacqueline Seaberg and Jacqueline Seaberg,Baltimoresun.com Staff | April 28, 2004
Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele will be a guest speaker today at the second annual African-American Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C. Steele will participate in a panel discussion about the importance of education in job training and community development. He also participated in the summit last year. U.S. Sens. Kay Bailey Hutchinson of Texas and Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania are co-chairs of the event, held at the Renaissance Hotel at 999 9th St. NW. On Friday morning, Steele will join Patti LaBelle to raise scholarship money for Coppin State University on the Tom Joyner Sky Show at 1st Mariner Arena in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Sun Staff Writer | August 22, 1994
Less than 24 hours after being ousted as executive director of the NAACP, the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. convened the second session of a black leadership summit yesterday that included few of the national figures who attended the first gathering in June.Dr. Chavis forged ahead with the meeting without the prestige and money afforded by his former post with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. And it showed.The conference is being held in a meeting room of West Baltimore's Bethel A.M.E.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2001
SHE DID IT on a whim. No one had visited her school to ask for donations. It wasn't an obligatory project for community service hours. It was a project that West Middle School pupil Brooke Richardson said she felt "tugs from the heart" to do. After months of collecting donations from fellow pupils, Carroll County teachers, lacrosse teammates, friends, neighbors and her church family, Brooke recently delivered four grocery carts and five boxes filled with...
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | June 7, 1994
Black separatist Louis Farrakhan, civil rights leader Jesse L. Jackson and Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Kweisi Mfume are expected to attend an NAACP-sponsored black leadership summit that begins Sunday in Baltimore.The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, which is based in Baltimore, has yet to release a list of the 70 to 100 participants in the 2 1/2 -day conference, which is designed to promote black unity.But aides to Mr. Jackson, head of the National Rainbow Coalition, and Representative Mfume, a West Baltimore Democrat, confirmed that the leaders would attend some of the sessions.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1994
Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. said last night a three-day gathering of African-American leaders from around the nation will be held without in Baltimore starting today despite his ouster as NAACP executive director.Instead of holding the second phase of the National African-American Leadership Summit at NAACP headquarters in northwest Baltimore, daytime sessions will be held at Bethel AME Church in West Baltimore and rallies will be held at West Baltimore's Enon Baptist Church this evening and at East Baltimore's Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, Dr. Chavis said.
NEWS
By Jacqueline Seaberg and Jacqueline Seaberg,Baltimoresun.com Staff | April 28, 2004
Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele will be a guest speaker today at the second annual African-American Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C. Steele will participate in a panel discussion about the importance of education in job training and community development. He also participated in the summit last year. U.S. Sens. Kay Bailey Hutchinson of Texas and Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania are co-chairs of the event, held at the Renaissance Hotel at 999 9th St. NW. On Friday morning, Steele will join Patti LaBelle to raise scholarship money for Coppin State University on the Tom Joyner Sky Show at 1st Mariner Arena in Baltimore.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Lashing out at black ministers who have shunned his leadership, Louis Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam likened himself yesterday to Jesus, saying that he heals the sick and is persecuted by scribes and religious people."
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer | August 24, 1994
Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., host of the National African American Leadership Summit, wanted to be perfectly clear -- he is not forming a new organization.The summit, which concluded yesterday in Baltimore, is "a movement" to build unity, he said.But the movement will raise money, he said. It will have a temporary address -- a Washington, D.C., office -- that will soon have a telephone. A fax. A post office box. An administrative assistant.But it is not a new organization, Dr. Chavis told reporters gathered to hear the results of the three-day summit that he says drew more than 100 participants -- community activists, clergy and professional people.
NEWS
By Fredrick McKissack Jr | June 9, 1995
THE MERE mention of the NAACP draws all types of responses from young African-Americans -- most of them negative.For many in the under-35 set, the NAACP is out of touch, out of time and, at least visibly, a non-factor. It's not as though too many members in the hip-hop generation are saying, "Go to a club or go to a NAACP meeting? What a dilemma!"I know, because I'm one of them. I've felt alienated by the older members of the civil rights movement, many of whom are holding on to the torch of freedom and equality so tightly their knuckles have turned white.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Lashing out at black ministers who have shunned his leadership, Louis Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam likened himself yesterday to Jesus, saying that he heals the sick and is persecuted by scribes and religious people."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In the first major meeting of black leaders since the Million Man March, the National African-American Leadership Summit -- chaired by the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. and spotlighting Louis Farrakhan -- convenes today to develop a strategic action plan."
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | July 2, 1995
Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. is not the kind of man to just go away, to leap willingly into that pit of oblivion that spectacular failure often opens beneath the feet of public figures.When he was fired last Aug. 20 as executive director of the NAACP, accused of mismanaging the organization's funds and in disgrace for surreptitiously trying to buy off a female aide who claimed he had sexually harassed her, many people expected to see the last of him.Many people were wrong.Ten months after losing the most prestigious job in the civil rights movement, the $200,000 salary that went with it, a living allowance, expense account and half a million dollars in life insurance, the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. is hard at work, trying to regain a national platform from which to air his views.
NEWS
By Fredrick McKissack Jr | June 9, 1995
THE MERE mention of the NAACP draws all types of responses from young African-Americans -- most of them negative.For many in the under-35 set, the NAACP is out of touch, out of time and, at least visibly, a non-factor. It's not as though too many members in the hip-hop generation are saying, "Go to a club or go to a NAACP meeting? What a dilemma!"I know, because I'm one of them. I've felt alienated by the older members of the civil rights movement, many of whom are holding on to the torch of freedom and equality so tightly their knuckles have turned white.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer | August 24, 1994
Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., host of the National African American Leadership Summit, wanted to be perfectly clear -- he is not forming a new organization.The summit, which concluded yesterday in Baltimore, is "a movement" to build unity, he said.But the movement will raise money, he said. It will have a temporary address -- a Washington, D.C., office -- that will soon have a telephone. A fax. A post office box. An administrative assistant.But it is not a new organization, Dr. Chavis told reporters gathered to hear the results of the three-day summit that he says drew more than 100 participants -- community activists, clergy and professional people.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Sun Staff Writer | August 22, 1994
Less than 24 hours after being ousted as executive director of the NAACP, the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. convened the second session of a black leadership summit yesterday that included few of the national figures who attended the first gathering in June.Dr. Chavis forged ahead with the meeting without the prestige and money afforded by his former post with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. And it showed.The conference is being held in a meeting room of West Baltimore's Bethel A.M.E.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | June 10, 1994
LOUIS Farrakhan rolls into town this weekend to attend the three-day summit on black leadership sponsored by the NAACP, and there are many who question why he was invited.The reasons are several. Not the least is that Mr. Farrakhan's popularity should not be underestimated. For years he has filled the charisma void created in the American black nationalist community by the death of Malcolm X in 1965. His formidable oratorical skills helped propel him into that position.I attended the Nation of Islam's Savior's Day convention in 1975 -- more out of respect for Elijah Muhammad, who had died the previous day, than with any intention of joining the organization.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | June 16, 1994
My barber, Leroy Gattis, believes the national black leadership summit, held in Baltimore this week, was a tremendous success."It separated the men from the boys," Leroy said enthusiastically, waving his clippers in the air. "It showed us who has guts and who doesn't; who has the courage to be a leader and who needs to step aside.""But it was all for show," I protested. "It was all primping and posing and talking tough in front of the TV cameras. Did they come up with any exciting new solutions?
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1994
Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. said last night a three-day gathering of African-American leaders from around the nation will be held without in Baltimore starting today despite his ouster as NAACP executive director.Instead of holding the second phase of the National African-American Leadership Summit at NAACP headquarters in northwest Baltimore, daytime sessions will be held at Bethel AME Church in West Baltimore and rallies will be held at West Baltimore's Enon Baptist Church this evening and at East Baltimore's Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, Dr. Chavis said.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | July 26, 1994
The Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis, executive director of the NAACP, closed the organization's recent convention in Chicago with an almost obligatory potshot at the news media.Invoking divine assistance in what the NAACP sees as a veritable holy war, Mr. Chavis intoned, "Lord, we know if you embrace us, nothing can get through -- no news media, no stone, no stick, no bullet, nothing of evil."So there you have it. The news media, in the eyes of the NAACP, is a "thing of evil" -- somewhat akin, we might surmise, to the Wicked Witch of the West in "The Wizard of Oz."
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