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By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | September 7, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Mandela found herself at the center of another storm yesterday, this time with the appearance of a letter in which she allegedly incriminates herself in the misuse of African National Congress funds.The lengthy letter, purportedly written by Mrs. Mandela and published in Sunday newspapers nationwide, confirmed a love affair with a young lawyer and blamed the affair for the breakup of her marriage with ANC leader Nelson Mandela.Most damaging of all, the letter seemed to confirm that Mrs. Mandela took thousands of dollars illegally from the ANC and squandered it with her purported lover, Dali Mpofu, 30. The letter is sure to further damage Mrs. Mandela's reputation and weaken her chances of a political comeback.
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NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | July 11, 1993
INDIANAPOLIS -- South African leader Nelson Mandela got the NAACP's annual convention off to a rousing start yesterday by calling on black Americans to help create a "democratic, nonracial and nonsexist" South Africa.Mr. Mandela, who is expected to become South Africa's first black president next year, said he would ask the United States to end economic sanctions against his country in the "near future.""Today we talk about elections because the sanctions have worked," said Mr. Mandela, who spent 27 years as a political prisoner in South Africa.
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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | November 28, 1990
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Responding to widespread concerns that South Africa's peace process has run into serious trouble, President Frederik W. de Klerk and black leader Nelson Mandela expressed their joint commitment yesterday to a negotiated political settlement.The two men, the key players in this country's unfolding political drama, met for nearly two hours in Mr. de Klerk's office but refused to revealdetails of their conversation.Mr. Mandela said the meeting was "cordial" and "productive," and the two leaders issued a joint statement saying they outlined their priorities and concerns about "developments threatening this process."
NEWS
February 21, 1993
A measure of the progress toward majority rule in South Africa is the deal between the white government and the African National Congress. President F. W. de Klerk and ANC leader Nelson Mandela say they want a five-year government of national unity, following elections late this year or early next. First they agreed, then they backed down under pressure, and then they agreed again.Objections were manifold. The Inkatha Freedom Party, an ANC rival, wanted strong regional government in territories it dominates.
NEWS
February 1, 1991
Despite war in the Persian Gulf, in South Africa this week there was progress toward peace. After a day-long meeting on Tuesday, African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela and Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi announced a major breakthrough toward ending a split that in recent years has turned violent and deadly. Since 1986, fighting between rival factions of South Africa's black community has claimed as many as 5,000 lives.The meeting, the first between the two leaders in almost three decades, may not immediately end the vicious rivalry between the followers of the two men. But the cordial atmosphere of the meeting and the two men's acknowledgment that their differences had been fully addressed without acrimony are reasons to hope that the healing process has truly begun.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | February 9, 1991
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- Black leader Nelson Mandela warned yesterday that there would be mass turmoil throughout the country if the European Community lifted sanctions against South Africa, as it is contemplating.Mr. Mandela said he doubted that the European Community actually would end the sanctions. But if it did, he said, it would be "a very serious mistake.""If the EC decides to review sanctions, you can expect that mass action in this country is going to be the order of the day and that the situation is going to be so unstable that no wise businessman is going to want to invest in this country," Mr. Mandela said at a news conference in Cape Town.
NEWS
May 15, 1991
If the case had involved anyone else in any other country, it's likely there would be no voices decrying the guilty verdict and six-year sentence meted out by a South African judge this week to Winnie Mandela for her part in the 1988 abduction and assault of four Soweto youths, one of whom was later found murdered near her home.Despite South Africa's discriminatory criminal justice system, the evidence presented in court by government prosecutors was sufficient to warrant a finding of guilty, and the judge acted well within the law in imposing a prison term for Winnie Mandela's crimes.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 22, 1990
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- After weeks of blaming each other for the outbreak of fighting between their followers, black nationalist leader Nelson Mandela and Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi plan to meet next month to discuss the violence plaguing black townships.But the Oct. 5 meeting will not be the one-on-one affair that MrButhelezi has sought with Mr. Mandela ever since the African National Congress deputy president was released from prison in February. Instead, the ANC has invited Mr. Buthelezi to a meeting that will include leaders of all 10 of South Africa's tribal homelands.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | February 14, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The trial of Winnie Mandela teetered on the brink of collapse yesterday after two key witnesses refused to testify, saying they feared for their lives if they spoke against the wife of South Africa's top black leader.Kenneth Kgase, 31, and Barend Mono, 21, told the court they were frightened by the recent abduction of a third witness, Gabriel Mekgwe, 22. The three have said previously that they were kidnapped from a Methodist mission house in December 1988 and brutally beaten by Mrs. Mandela and her bodyguards.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | April 18, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The state prosecutor attacked Winnie Mandela yesterday for waiting two years to tell authorities that she was out of town when four young men were allegedly abducted and beaten at her house in the black township of Soweto.Prosecutor Jan Swanepoel questioned Mrs. Mandela as she took the witness stand for the second day. He raised repeated doubts about the alibi that she offered in testimony the previous day -- that she had been nearly 200 miles from home on the night of the incident.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | September 7, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Mandela found herself at the center of another storm yesterday, this time with the appearance of a letter in which she allegedly incriminates herself in the misuse of African National Congress funds.The lengthy letter, purportedly written by Mrs. Mandela and published in Sunday newspapers nationwide, confirmed a love affair with a young lawyer and blamed the affair for the breakup of her marriage with ANC leader Nelson Mandela.Most damaging of all, the letter seemed to confirm that Mrs. Mandela took thousands of dollars illegally from the ANC and squandered it with her purported lover, Dali Mpofu, 30. The letter is sure to further damage Mrs. Mandela's reputation and weaken her chances of a political comeback.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | May 26, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Mandela is not one for quiet exits.To the apparent chagrin of some officials of the African National Congress, of which she remains a controversial member, Mrs. Mandela is still front-page news in South Africa.Some had hoped she would slip from the limelight after the breakup of her marriage to ANC leader Nelson Mandela last month and that she would lose her claim to power in South Africa's top black political organization.The power slippage is occurring as expected.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 4, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- President F. W. de Klerk rejected yesterday a plea from black leader Nelson Mandela to release three white right-wing extremists who are staging a hunger strike in an attempt to avoid trial on bombing charges.Mr. Mandela, an unlikely champion for the three men whose right-wing organization generally wants nothing to do with blacks, visited the men in their Pretoria hospital rooms Monday and then urged the president to release them on humanitarian grounds.But Mr. Mandela emerged from his meeting at the presidential offices in Pretoria and told reporters that Mr. de Klerk "was not prepared to consider" freeing the men, who have been on a hunger strike for 58, 51 and 44 days.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | May 23, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Less than two weeks after her conviction on kidnapping and assault-related charges, Winnie Mandela was hauled off to jail yesterday for leading protests against the detention of political prisoners.Police charged Mrs. Mandela, the wife of African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela, with obstructing traffic and resisting arrest after she and about 200 other women blocked a downtown street with a truck and a heavy chain.After she was charged and released by a regional magistrate, Mrs. Mandela led another protest outside City Hall and was arrested a second time by officers who used tear gas and dogs to break up the gathering.
NEWS
May 15, 1991
If the case had involved anyone else in any other country, it's likely there would be no voices decrying the guilty verdict and six-year sentence meted out by a South African judge this week to Winnie Mandela for her part in the 1988 abduction and assault of four Soweto youths, one of whom was later found murdered near her home.Despite South Africa's discriminatory criminal justice system, the evidence presented in court by government prosecutors was sufficient to warrant a finding of guilty, and the judge acted well within the law in imposing a prison term for Winnie Mandela's crimes.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | May 8, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Mandela's lawyerlaunched his final argument in her defense yesterday, saying the state had provided no proof that she took part in either kidnapping or assault.George Bizos said the state had proved that "serious assaults were committed at the back of Mrs. Mandela's house" in December 1988, but he said that "proof of the commission of the assault is not proof that Mrs. Mandela was present."Mrs. Mandela, 56, the wife of African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela, has said she was out of town when four young men were brought to her home Dec. 29, 1988.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | November 11, 1990
SOWETO, South Africa -- Black nationalist leader Nelson Mandela said yesterday that the African National Congress will hold talks soon with its main black political adversary and the white government to stop the violence that threatens to turn South Africa into "another Lebanon."Mr. Mandela said he would meet with President Frederik W. de Klerk on Nov. 27 and with Zulu leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi as soon as possible to ensure that the peace process continues."We are concerned about the increasing tensions in the country, the violence that has erupted again," Mr. Mandela told a news conference yesterday, one day after he returned from a major trip to Europe, Asia and Australia.
NEWS
February 21, 1993
A measure of the progress toward majority rule in South Africa is the deal between the white government and the African National Congress. President F. W. de Klerk and ANC leader Nelson Mandela say they want a five-year government of national unity, following elections late this year or early next. First they agreed, then they backed down under pressure, and then they agreed again.Objections were manifold. The Inkatha Freedom Party, an ANC rival, wanted strong regional government in territories it dominates.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | April 21, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- It has been a tough week for Winnie Mandela, the anti-apartheid movement's "mother of the nation" and wife of legendary black leader Nelson Mandela, who is one of the key figures in negotiations on South Africa's future.Mrs. Mandela has come under intense questioning from a government prosecutor, who is seeking to prove that she participated in the 1988 kidnapping and beating of four young men in the black township of Soweto.After four days on the witness stand, the often flamboyant, always outspoken Mrs. Mandela was the picture of composure.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | April 18, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The state prosecutor attacked Winnie Mandela yesterday for waiting two years to tell authorities that she was out of town when four young men were allegedly abducted and beaten at her house in the black township of Soweto.Prosecutor Jan Swanepoel questioned Mrs. Mandela as she took the witness stand for the second day. He raised repeated doubts about the alibi that she offered in testimony the previous day -- that she had been nearly 200 miles from home on the night of the incident.
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