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Lead Levels

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By Medical Tribune News Service | February 7, 1991
Exposure to low levels of lead, already linked to higher-than-average school failure rates in teen-agers, may cause learning deficiencies in children as young as 5 years old, according to a new study.Doctors in Boston found that 2-year-olds exposed to lead at levels far lower than the government deems hazardous developed learning disabilities by the time they were 5.The same study also discovered that in children exposed to lead as fetuses, learning comprehension returned by age 5 if they had no further exposure to lead after birth.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
The Baltimore County Police Department plans to renovate its indoor shooting range in Lutherville after being cited for exposing employees to high concentrations of lead. Maryland Occupational Safety and Health issued the citations in May after finding that the ventilation system operated poorly and other protections against lead exposure, such as regular disposal of combustible waste, were not in place. Police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said the department is evaluating plans to improve ventilation.
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NEWS
June 13, 2008
The number and percentage of Baltimore children with elevated levels of lead in the blood continued to decline last year, state and city health officials reported yesterday. Overall, 624 children, or 3.5 percent of those tested, had lead levels greater than 10 micrograms per deciliter, compared with 4.6 percent in 2006, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment. Thanks to lead abatement programs and education, the proportion has been declining steadily since 1998, when it was 22 percent.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Young World Store on Liberty Heights Avenue has been cited by the Baltimore City Health Department for selling children's bracelets with excessive levels of lead, the agency announced Thursday. The agency said lead levels in the multicolored bangle bracelet are 25 times the amount permitted. This is the third time in three years that the store at 2401 Liberty Heights Ave. has been cited for lead violations, according to the health department, which alerted the Consumer Product Safety Commission to the most recent findings.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 2003
Lead levels now widely believed to be safe in children actually produce a severe impact on intellectual development, researchers report. Blood levels of lead below current federal and international guidelines of 10 micrograms per deciliter produce a surprisingly large 7.4-point drop in IQ, a U.S. team reports in today's New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers estimate that 1 in 50 U.S. children has lead levels above that guideline and that 1 in 10 has levels of 5 micrograms/deciliter or above - well within the dangerous range.
NEWS
May 29, 2008
The findings may not be surprising, but two new studies linking childhood lead exposure to later criminal activity are still extremely disturbing. It may not be news to anyone who has sat in juvenile court in Baltimore, where lawyers for youthful offenders have tried to use lead poisoning as an excuse for their clients' bad behavior. But in tracking the harmful, long-term effects of lead, the studies serve as another loud reminder - for Baltimore, Maryland and the nation - that no amount of this toxin in the body can be considered safe.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2003
An Annapolis city council member called yesterday for expanded testing for lead paint at two public housing complexes after sample tests revealed high levels of the toxic substance. In a letter yesterday, Alderwoman Cynthia A. Carter urged the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to test nearly 400 units in the College Creek Terrace and Harbor House communities. She also asked Anne Arundel County to test children living in the communities for lead poisoning. "We need to take action as quickly as possible," Carter said in an interview.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
City officials have cited two local businesses for selling children's jewelry that contains lead levels in excess of the federal standard of 300 parts per million. Rainbow Kids was selling a Princess and the Frog necklace and bracelet set, and Youngworld Store was selling a Princess Expressions purple crown bracelet that violated standards. Both are in Mondawmin Mall and will no longer be permitted to sell the items. The Baltimore Health Department tested seven products in June for lead, a neurotoxin that can cause cognitive impairment and neurological problems in small doses and more severe illness and death at higher doses.
NEWS
By Kathleen Beeman and Kathleen Beeman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A nationwide crackdown on 36 companies that allegedly discharge lead into the environment was announced jointly yesterday by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Justice Department.The EPA directed more than $10 million in fines against 12 facilities, while the Justice Department went to court against 24 companies in 19 states and Puerto Rico. The actions are designed to send a signal to industry that the federal government is serious about reducing lead levels, according to EPA Deputy Administrator Hank Habitch.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | August 2, 1991
More than 600 domestic and imported wines tested by federal officials were found to contain lead, some at potentially dangerous levels for high-risk individuals, according to a report released by the U. S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.The report pointed to lead foil capsules -- or the closures -- that cover table wine corks as a chief cause of the toxic metal found by the researchers. "Significant lead contamination can result [in wine] from contact with the corrosion products of the lead capsule," the bureau stated in its report.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
State health officials are seeking the public's advice on how to deal with new federal guidelines expanding the number of young children deemed at risk of harm from low-level lead exposure. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is considering whether to have local health departments follow all young children testing positive for low levels of toxic lead in their bloodstream, or to leave the least exposed youngsters to doctors and other health care providers to track. Earlier this year, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention effectively halved its long-standing threshold for acting on low-level lead exposure in young children.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Despite dramatic progress in reducing Americans' exposure to lead over the past 25 years, a growing body of research finds that children and adults still face health risks from even very low levels of the toxic metal in their blood. A recent government study, prepared with help of researchers from Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health, tallies the wide-ranging damage low-level lead exposure can do, beyond the well-documented effects of reducing youngsters' IQ and undermining their ability to learn and control their behavior.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
City officials have cited two local businesses for selling children's jewelry that contains lead levels in excess of the federal standard of 300 parts per million. Rainbow Kids was selling a Princess and the Frog necklace and bracelet set, and Youngworld Store was selling a Princess Expressions purple crown bracelet that violated standards. Both are in Mondawmin Mall and will no longer be permitted to sell the items. The Baltimore Health Department tested seven products in June for lead, a neurotoxin that can cause cognitive impairment and neurological problems in small doses and more severe illness and death at higher doses.
NEWS
June 13, 2008
The number and percentage of Baltimore children with elevated levels of lead in the blood continued to decline last year, state and city health officials reported yesterday. Overall, 624 children, or 3.5 percent of those tested, had lead levels greater than 10 micrograms per deciliter, compared with 4.6 percent in 2006, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment. Thanks to lead abatement programs and education, the proportion has been declining steadily since 1998, when it was 22 percent.
NEWS
May 29, 2008
The findings may not be surprising, but two new studies linking childhood lead exposure to later criminal activity are still extremely disturbing. It may not be news to anyone who has sat in juvenile court in Baltimore, where lawyers for youthful offenders have tried to use lead poisoning as an excuse for their clients' bad behavior. But in tracking the harmful, long-term effects of lead, the studies serve as another loud reminder - for Baltimore, Maryland and the nation - that no amount of this toxin in the body can be considered safe.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Jenny Hopkinson and Gina Davis and Jenny Hopkinson,Sun reporters | August 3, 2007
Amy Hough stopped by the Owings Mills Toys "R" Us store yesterday, but she avoided a line of playthings that her 2-year-old daughter Samantha loves. "I kind of bypassed the Dora aisle," Hough said, "even though it's her favorite." The 34-year-old mother was among the wave of concerned parents searching for help in responding to news of a huge toy recall that warned them that they might need to ditch Dora the Explorer and give Big Bird the boot - and left consumers wondering whether other dangers lurk in their children's toy boxes.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
State health officials are seeking the public's advice on how to deal with new federal guidelines expanding the number of young children deemed at risk of harm from low-level lead exposure. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is considering whether to have local health departments follow all young children testing positive for low levels of toxic lead in their bloodstream, or to leave the least exposed youngsters to doctors and other health care providers to track. Earlier this year, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention effectively halved its long-standing threshold for acting on low-level lead exposure in young children.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2001
State laws designed to protect children from the dangers of lead paint may be a burden to some landlords, but the measures are working, a group of scientists was told yesterday. Susan Guyaux of the Maryland Department of Environment told scientists and regulatory officials at a Towson University seminar yesterday that the number of Maryland children with high lead levels in their blood has dropped steadily since 1996 when the state Lead Risk Reduction Act was adopted. The law requires landlords who rent out houses built before 1950 to have them tested for lead and to alert tenants to their rights regarding lead paint hazards.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Frank D. Roylance and Jonathan D. Rockoff and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTERS | September 19, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Federal regulators made it easier yesterday for health clinics to test children for lead poisoning, which could bolster prevention efforts - particularly in cities such as Baltimore with high levels of lead in older buildings. The Food and Drug Administration announced that it was allowing widespread sales of a laptop-size kit that indicates within three minutes whether a person has elevated levels of lead in the blood. "We don't have to wait [while] the lead level in a child's blood is affecting their development," said Dr. John O. Agwunobi, an assistant secretary for health who has worked as a pediatrician in city health clinics.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | August 15, 2006
Declaring that the federal government has failed to protect children from lead, Baltimore's health commissioner has announced plans for a citywide ban on the sale of jewelry found to contain dangerous levels of the metal. Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, the commissioner, said that this month his agency surveyed six sellers of jewelry made for children and found four of 17 products had unacceptably high amounts of lead. "The fact that we keep finding lead in these products, despite the fact that it's unsafe, is a clear sign that the federal regulation has failed," he said yesterday at a news conference.
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