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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2002
Property slated for a housing project at Fort Meade contains some hazardous materials but is suitable for redevelopment, according to environmental documents that the Army released yesterday. After initially declining to provide the reports to a review board and The Sun, Army officials released yesterday several studies conducted months ago on land that Fort Meade is leasing to a private company. The contractor plans to build about 3,000 houses for soldiers there. The documents confirm the presence of asbestos, radon and lead-based paint at the property on the post's north side.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Timothy B. Wheeler and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
Two Baltimore lawmakers are backing legislation that would make it easier for victims of lead poisoning to sue manufacturers of lead-based paint for damages. The bill -- which would hold paint manufacturers responsible for harming thousands of Maryland children based on how much lead-based paint they sold in the state -- would help Baltimore attorney Peter G. Angelos pursue two lawsuits he has filed against the pigment industry. Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg said yesterday that he is drafting a bill that would allow "market-share liability" claims against lead-paint manufacturers in Maryland courts.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL GISRIEL | January 12, 1997
Dear Mr. Gisriel:I own several rental real estate properties in the Baltimore metropolitan area. My question is: What is the current status of the federal and state "Lead Paint Registration" laws? Also, where can I get more information?Alan WalshBaltimoreDear Mr. Walsh:Your question is a timely one. On the federal level, after Dec. 6, 1996, all owners of rental properties -- both owners of more than four properties and owners of less than four properties -- are covered by the federal lead paint regulations.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
In a bid to get more property owners to obey cleanup orders, Baltimore health officials are easing the requirements for removing hazardous lead paint from properties where children have been poisoned.Seeking to break a political deadlock between the city's landlords and public health advocates, officials have decided to try a one-year experiment in which property owners will not be required, as they are now, to remove or cover all lead-based paint found in their properties.The new guidelines, to take effect this fall, could significantly lower the $14,000 average cost of totally "de-leading" a three-bedroom rowhouse, which has been a major stumbling block to efforts to prevent lead poisoning.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Americans' exposure to lead has declined greatly in the past 15 years, but the toxic metal remains a major health threat for nearly 2 million young children, particularly inner-city black youngsters in cities like Baltimore, federal health officials reported today.A nationwide federal health survey summarized in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association reports that levels of lead in the blood of children and adults dropped by 78 percent from 1976 to 1991.Hailing it as a "remarkable public health achievement," officials for the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention attributed declining lead exposures to the government's removal of the metal from gasoline, water and consumer products, including food cans and house paint.
NEWS
Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | January 3, 2014
Interested residents can now apply for the Maryland Housing Rehabilitation Program for Single Family, Howard County Housing announced last month. MRHP-SF is a housing rehabilitation program that preserves and improves single-family properties with an emphasis on bringing eligible properties into compliance with applicable building codes and standards, according to the county. Homeowners can secure low-interest loans for home maintenance, including "correcting exterior or interior deficiencies; making accessibility modifications; correcting health and safety violations; improving the home's weatherization and energy conservation and correcting lead-based paint violations," according to the county.
BUSINESS
By ROBERT J. TERRY and ROBERT J. TERRY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 9, 2003
A Columbia-based housing organization that has worked to reduce lead-paint poisoning in children is expanding to focus on other health problems as it marks its first decade of work. The National Center for Healthy Housing - launched in 1992 by the Enterprise Foundation, the philanthropic organization founded by developer James Rouse - has authored groundbreaking studies of lead-paint hazards in federally subsidized and low-income housing. The group celebrated its 10th anniversary last week as it was being named one of seven organizations sharing a total of $6.5 million in U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development grants.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | August 5, 1992
BOSTON -- A major study of Boston children shows that removing lead from contaminated soil in back yards can reduce the level of the toxic substance in children's blood, but not as much as had been expected, according to federal officials.A similar study was conducted in Baltimore, where children showed even less of an improvement in blood lead levels than those in Boston, officials said. The results of the Baltimore study have not been released.The finding raises fundamental questions about how a key urban health problem should be addressed and about whether federal Superfund cleanup of lead-contaminated soil would help, say public health and government officials.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2000
After a months-long delay, city and state officials said yesterday they are poised to attack Baltimore's epidemic of childhood lead poisoning by cleaning more than 500 homes riddled with the toxic substance in the next year. The joint lead-poisoning campaign, promised in January by Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Mayor Martin O'Malley, has been stalled for several months as legislators blocked release of $5 million in state funds for the effort until they were convinced city and state officials could work together effectively.
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