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NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | January 3, 2014
Interested residents can now apply for the Maryland Housing Rehabilitation Program for Single Family, Howard County Housing announced last month. MRHP-SF is a housing rehabilitation program that preserves and improes single-family properties with an emphasis on bringing eligible properties into compliance with applicable buildign codes and standards, according to the county. Homeowners can secure low-interest loans for home maintenance, including "correcting exterior or interior deficiencies; making accessibility modifications; correcting health and safety violations; improving the home's weatherization and energy conservation and correcting lead-based paint violations," according to the county.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Americans' exposure to lead has declined greatly in the past 15 years, but the toxic metal remains a major health threat for nearly 2 million young children, particularly inner-city black youngsters in cities like Baltimore, federal health officials reported today.A nationwide federal health survey summarized in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association reports that levels of lead in the blood of children and adults dropped by 78 percent from 1976 to 1991.Hailing it as a "remarkable public health achievement," officials for the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention attributed declining lead exposures to the government's removal of the metal from gasoline, water and consumer products, including food cans and house paint.
NEWS
July 28, 1997
A Taneytown husband and wife will be able to continue to live in a mobile home on their Trevanion Road property while lead paint is removed from their house.The Carroll County Board of Zoning Appeals agreed to allow David E. Williams Jr. and his wife, Jane, to continue to live in their mobile home until Jan. 1. A county law allows people to live in trailers on their property for one year while a home is being rebuilt or repaired; the couple was given a six-month extension.The Williamses and their two young sons had to move out of the house after they learned that lead paint dust was poisoning the ** children.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2002
Property slated for a housing project at Fort Meade contains some hazardous materials but is suitable for redevelopment, according to environmental documents that the Army released yesterday. After initially declining to provide the reports to a review board and The Sun, Army officials released yesterday several studies conducted months ago on land that Fort Meade is leasing to a private company. The contractor plans to build about 3,000 houses for soldiers there. The documents confirm the presence of asbestos, radon and lead-based paint at the property on the post's north side.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
In a bid to get more property owners to obey cleanup orders, Baltimore health officials are easing the requirements for removing hazardous lead paint from properties where children have been poisoned.Seeking to break a political deadlock between the city's landlords and public health advocates, officials have decided to try a one-year experiment in which property owners will not be required, as they are now, to remove or cover all lead-based paint found in their properties.The new guidelines, to take effect this fall, could significantly lower the $14,000 average cost of totally "de-leading" a three-bedroom rowhouse, which has been a major stumbling block to efforts to prevent lead poisoning.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Timothy B. Wheeler and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
Two Baltimore lawmakers are backing legislation that would make it easier for victims of lead poisoning to sue manufacturers of lead-based paint for damages. The bill -- which would hold paint manufacturers responsible for harming thousands of Maryland children based on how much lead-based paint they sold in the state -- would help Baltimore attorney Peter G. Angelos pursue two lawsuits he has filed against the pigment industry. Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg said yesterday that he is drafting a bill that would allow "market-share liability" claims against lead-paint manufacturers in Maryland courts.
NEWS
By Don Ryan | August 28, 2001
WASHINGTON - The Maryland Court of Appeals' harsh criticism of the Kennedy Krieger Institute's lead poisoning research has created the impression that researchers sacrificed children's health for the good of science. The outrage expressed in news reports is rooted in the false premise that this study placed children in harm's way. The reality is that this research made homes safer, not only for the children in Baltimore but for hundreds of thousands of others across the nation. Children do not live in lead-burdened houses because researchers want to "experiment" on them but because so much of our housing is contaminated by lead.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1991, Washington Post Writers Group | May 26, 1991
New York--When you bought your last house, you might have had it checked for termites and dry rot.When you buy your next one, you should check it for a wide range of environmental hazards as well.Almost any piece of property might, in the past, have had toxic substances buried there. Almost any vacant lot might be hit, in the night, by guys in dark shirts who are making an illegal dump. Almost any homeowner might turn on the tap and find the water stinking of chemicals from a nearby spill.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | April 27, 1994
Sporting a fresh coat of paint and aluminum replacement windows, a brick rowhouse on Mosher Street yesterday became the first of more than 400 houses in Baltimore to be rendered safe from poisonous lead-based paint under a new federal grant program.In the process, the fix-up demonstrated how money -- and lots of it -- is the key to Baltimore's decades-old struggle with lead poisoning, which can cause lifelong learning disabilities and health problems in young children.The house, in the West Baltimore neighborhood of Sandtown-Winchester, is the first in the country to be finished under a federal lead-abatement program begun two years ago by the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
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