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BUSINESS
By MICHAEL GISRIEL | January 12, 1997
Dear Mr. Gisriel:I own several rental real estate properties in the Baltimore metropolitan area. My question is: What is the current status of the federal and state "Lead Paint Registration" laws? Also, where can I get more information?Alan WalshBaltimoreDear Mr. Walsh:Your question is a timely one. On the federal level, after Dec. 6, 1996, all owners of rental properties -- both owners of more than four properties and owners of less than four properties -- are covered by the federal lead paint regulations.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
In a bid to get more property owners to obey cleanup orders, Baltimore health officials are easing the requirements for removing hazardous lead paint from properties where children have been poisoned.Seeking to break a political deadlock between the city's landlords and public health advocates, officials have decided to try a one-year experiment in which property owners will not be required, as they are now, to remove or cover all lead-based paint found in their properties.The new guidelines, to take effect this fall, could significantly lower the $14,000 average cost of totally "de-leading" a three-bedroom rowhouse, which has been a major stumbling block to efforts to prevent lead poisoning.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Americans' exposure to lead has declined greatly in the past 15 years, but the toxic metal remains a major health threat for nearly 2 million young children, particularly inner-city black youngsters in cities like Baltimore, federal health officials reported today.A nationwide federal health survey summarized in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association reports that levels of lead in the blood of children and adults dropped by 78 percent from 1976 to 1991.Hailing it as a "remarkable public health achievement," officials for the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention attributed declining lead exposures to the government's removal of the metal from gasoline, water and consumer products, including food cans and house paint.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1991, Washington Post Writers Group | May 26, 1991
New York--When you bought your last house, you might have had it checked for termites and dry rot.When you buy your next one, you should check it for a wide range of environmental hazards as well.Almost any piece of property might, in the past, have had toxic substances buried there. Almost any vacant lot might be hit, in the night, by guys in dark shirts who are making an illegal dump. Almost any homeowner might turn on the tap and find the water stinking of chemicals from a nearby spill.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
A Baltimore jury has awarded nearly $2.1 million to a 17-year-old city youth who was allegedly poisoned by lead paint in the 1990s when he was a toddler in an East Baltimore rental home. The judgment against Elliot Dackman and the estates of Sandra and Bernard Dackman came Friday in Baltimore Circuit Court, at the end of the weeklong trial of a lawsuit brought on behalf of Daquantay Robinson by his mother, Tiesha Robinson. The jury verdict shows the long-running tide of litigation over the widespread use of lead-based paint in Baltimore's older rental housing has yet to ebb, according to Bruce Powell, the Robinsons' lawyer.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
In a class action lawsuit filed Thursday, Kennedy Krieger Institute is accused of exposing poor black children to "dangerous levels" of lead as part of a housing experiment in the 1990s. The suit, filed Thursday in Baltimore City Circuit Court by attorney Billy Murphy, accuses the instituteof negligence, fraud, battery and violating the state's consumer protection act. It seeks damages, interest and unspecified attorney fees. The hospital "used these children as known guinea pigs in these contaminated houses to complete this study," the suit states.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2000
After a months-long delay, city and state officials said yesterday they are poised to attack Baltimore's epidemic of childhood lead poisoning by cleaning more than 500 homes riddled with the toxic substance in the next year. The joint lead-poisoning campaign, promised in January by Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Mayor Martin O'Malley, has been stalled for several months as legislators blocked release of $5 million in state funds for the effort until they were convinced city and state officials could work together effectively.
NEWS
February 11, 2000
AN EPIDEMIC of lead poisoning courses through Baltimore's inner city, but testing shows children are exposed and poisoned in almost every Maryland county. The cases in rural and suburban areas don't climb into the thousands as they do in Baltimore, but no one in Carroll County or Anne Arundel, Howard or Harford should be consoled to learn that only a few of their were exposed and that fewer had lead levels deemed dangerous. In Montgomery County, the state's most affluent, 8,044 children were tested in 1998 under the Medicaid program.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | February 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Ambitious federal plans for combating childhood lead poisoning are under attack from lawmakers, environmentalists and health advocates because the Bush administration intends to spend only a fraction of what it says is needed to deal with the problem.Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan unveiled a 5-year "strategic plan" yesterday aimed at eliminating lead poisoning, which he called the "No. 1 environmental hazard facing our children."The plan, which officials estimate will cost nearly $1 billion, calls for expanded screening of children, removing deteriorating lead-based paint from older homes and apartments, and reducing other exposures to the toxic metal.
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