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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
In a bid to get more property owners to obey cleanup orders, Baltimore health officials are easing the requirements for removing hazardous lead paint from properties where children have been poisoned.Seeking to break a political deadlock between the city's landlords and public health advocates, officials have decided to try a one-year experiment in which property owners will not be required, as they are now, to remove or cover all lead-based paint found in their properties.The new guidelines, to take effect this fall, could significantly lower the $14,000 average cost of totally "de-leading" a three-bedroom rowhouse, which has been a major stumbling block to efforts to prevent lead poisoning.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun Reporter Rafael Alvarez of The Sun's Metropolitan staff contributed to this article | July 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Low-income homeowners and child-care centers would be eligible for money to remove lead-based paint, the prime cause of lead poisoning, under legislation introduced yesterday by Representative Benjamin L. Cardin, D-Md.-3rd.Lead poisoning is considered one of the nation's major health risks for children, particularly in older cities like Baltimore, where the health department recently relaxed requirements for removing lead-paint from rental properties to encourage more landlords to address the problem.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | May 26, 1991
Long before the state's environmental secretary pushed for stronger enforcement of the federal Lead Containment Control Act earlier this month, Carroll County schools have engaged in detection and removal of the dangerous substance."
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2004
An environmental testing company has found that the lead paint at several Annapolis public housing units "does not pose a health hazard to residents and occupants," despite higher-than-normal amounts of the toxic substance detected in the buildings last fall. "The lead-based paint is buried under layers of newer, non-lead paint" and "the surfaces of the lead-based paint are intact and are not peeling loose," Jennifer W. Matherly, a project engineer for Environmental Testing Inc. in Middletown, Del., wrote in a recent letter.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2004
An environmental testing company has found that the lead paint at several Annapolis public housing units "does not pose a health hazard to residents and occupants," despite higher-than-normal amounts of the toxic substance detected in the buildings last fall. "The lead-based paint is buried under layers of newer, non-lead paint" and "the surfaces of the lead-based paint are intact and are not peeling loose," Jennifer W. Matherly, a project engineer for Environmental Testing Inc. in Middletown, Del., wrote in a recent letter.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Today they endure climbing children and have bicycles chained to them, but the cannons that flank Patterson Park's Pagoda were used in wars as much as 350 years ago, park officials have found. A cannon expert surveyed the seven historic weapons last fall and will soon undertake their restoration after finding they aren't just reproductions, as many had thought in the century since they were installed to commemorate the War of 1812 centennial. Some were likely used in the Battle of Baltimore, on land or sea, and in the Revolutionary War - or earlier.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL GISRIEL | January 12, 1997
Dear Mr. Gisriel:I own several rental real estate properties in the Baltimore metropolitan area. My question is: What is the current status of the federal and state "Lead Paint Registration" laws? Also, where can I get more information?Alan WalshBaltimoreDear Mr. Walsh:Your question is a timely one. On the federal level, after Dec. 6, 1996, all owners of rental properties -- both owners of more than four properties and owners of less than four properties -- are covered by the federal lead paint regulations.
NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | January 3, 2014
Interested residents can now apply for the Maryland Housing Rehabilitation Program for Single Family, Howard County Housing announced last month. MRHP-SF is a housing rehabilitation program that preserves and improes single-family properties with an emphasis on bringing eligible properties into compliance with applicable buildign codes and standards, according to the county. Homeowners can secure low-interest loans for home maintenance, including "correcting exterior or interior deficiencies; making accessibility modifications; correcting health and safety violations; improving the home's weatherization and energy conservation and correcting lead-based paint violations," according to the county.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Americans' exposure to lead has declined greatly in the past 15 years, but the toxic metal remains a major health threat for nearly 2 million young children, particularly inner-city black youngsters in cities like Baltimore, federal health officials reported today.A nationwide federal health survey summarized in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association reports that levels of lead in the blood of children and adults dropped by 78 percent from 1976 to 1991.Hailing it as a "remarkable public health achievement," officials for the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention attributed declining lead exposures to the government's removal of the metal from gasoline, water and consumer products, including food cans and house paint.
NEWS
July 28, 1997
A Taneytown husband and wife will be able to continue to live in a mobile home on their Trevanion Road property while lead paint is removed from their house.The Carroll County Board of Zoning Appeals agreed to allow David E. Williams Jr. and his wife, Jane, to continue to live in their mobile home until Jan. 1. A county law allows people to live in trailers on their property for one year while a home is being rebuilt or repaired; the couple was given a six-month extension.The Williamses and their two young sons had to move out of the house after they learned that lead paint dust was poisoning the ** children.
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