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Lead Based Paint

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By Timothy B. Wheeler | January 21, 1992
A Baltimore painting contractor was given probation before judgment in city Circuit Court today in the first criminal prosecution of anyone for improperly removing hazardous lead-based paint from a home.Judge Elsbeth L. Bothe ordered Mark A. Crosby Inc. to perform $2,000 worth of free painting as community service for violating state lead paint abatement regulations when the contracting firm repainted a Cedarcroft home in the summer of 1990.But Bothe rejected arguments by the prosecutor that the court should convict the firm to "send a signal" that the state is serious about enforcing rules requiring safe removal or covering over of lead-based paint.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
A Baltimore jury has awarded nearly $2.1 million to a 17-year-old city youth who was allegedly poisoned by lead paint in the 1990s when he was a toddler in an East Baltimore rental home. The judgment against Elliot Dackman and the estates of Sandra and Bernard Dackman came Friday in Baltimore Circuit Court, at the end of the weeklong trial of a lawsuit brought on behalf of Daquantay Robinson by his mother, Tiesha Robinson. The jury verdict shows the long-running tide of litigation over the widespread use of lead-based paint in Baltimore's older rental housing has yet to ebb, according to Bruce Powell, the Robinsons' lawyer.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff Mick Rood of States News Service contributed to this story | December 14, 1990
Young children risk lead poisoning in about 3.8 million U.S. homes that contain peeling lead-based paint or high levels of hazardous lead-paint dust, according to a new national survey.In a report prepared for Congress, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Jack Kemp gives the highest estimate yet of the number of American homes contaminated by lead-based paint, and he outlines a national plan to fight lead poisoning in privately owned housing.The plan, requested by Congress three years ago, proposes offering financial assistance to lower-income families with children living in homes where lead-based paint is a health hazard.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
The number of Maryland children poisoned by lead fell to a new low again last year, even as state officials expanded their effort to deal with a much larger pool of youngsters harboring lower levels of the harmful substance in their blood. A report released Tuesday by the Department of the Environment said 364 children statewide were found in 2012 to have dangerous levels of lead in their blood. Last year's tally of 452 had been the lowest since testing began in 1993. Statewide, 110,539 children under the age of 6 were tested, an increase from the previous year, the report said.
NEWS
July 10, 2011
I was appalled to learn recently how the three young children of my neighbors on Henrietta Street in Federal Hill were put at risk of lead poisoning. The law allows only contractors who are certified to remove lead-based paint. In this renovation, a certified contractor won a contract for the paint removal and then scooted around the EPA requirement by subcontracting the work. The subcontractor was not certified, and indeed failed to take the required precautions. Lead-based paint dust and debris were spread over the property and neighboring properties.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
In a bid to get more property owners to obey cleanup orders, Baltimore health officials are easing the requirements for removing hazardous lead paint from properties where children have been poisoned.Seeking to break a political deadlock between the city's landlords and public health advocates, officials have decided to try a one-year experiment in which property owners will not be required, as they are now, to remove or cover all lead-based paint found in their properties.The new guidelines, to take effect this fall, could significantly lower the $14,000 average cost of totally "de-leading" a three-bedroom rowhouse, which has been a major stumbling block to efforts to prevent lead poisoning.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun Reporter Rafael Alvarez of The Sun's Metropolitan staff contributed to this article | July 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Low-income homeowners and child-care centers would be eligible for money to remove lead-based paint, the prime cause of lead poisoning, under legislation introduced yesterday by Representative Benjamin L. Cardin, D-Md.-3rd.Lead poisoning is considered one of the nation's major health risks for children, particularly in older cities like Baltimore, where the health department recently relaxed requirements for removing lead-paint from rental properties to encourage more landlords to address the problem.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
Americans would help finance the towering costs of finding and removing hazardous lead paint from older homes in Baltimore and elsewhere around the country by paying about $15 more for their car batteries, under legislation being introduced in Congress today.Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, D-Md., said the bill he drafted would raise $1 billion a year for lead-paint abatement by levying an excise tax on continuing uses of lead."This legislation provides the only real cure for lead poisoning -- prevention," Cardin said in a statement.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2004
An environmental testing company has found that the lead paint at several Annapolis public housing units "does not pose a health hazard to residents and occupants," despite higher-than-normal amounts of the toxic substance detected in the buildings last fall. "The lead-based paint is buried under layers of newer, non-lead paint" and "the surfaces of the lead-based paint are intact and are not peeling loose," Jennifer W. Matherly, a project engineer for Environmental Testing Inc. in Middletown, Del., wrote in a recent letter.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
In a bid to get more property owners to obey cleanup orders, Baltimore health officials are easing the requirements for removing hazardous lead paint from properties where children have been poisoned.Seeking to break a political deadlock between the city's landlords and public health advocates, officials have decided to try a one-year experiment in which property owners will not be required, as they are now, to remove or cover all lead-based paint found in their properties.The new guidelines, to take effect this fall, could significantly lower the $14,000 average cost of totally "de-leading" a three-bedroom rowhouse, which has been a major stumbling block to efforts to prevent lead poisoning.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
Annapolis lobbyist Bruce C. Bereano has been fined $13,000 by the Maryland Department of the Environment for allegedly violating state lead-paint regulations on two properties he owns in the capital. But Bereano disputes the state's charges, saying the homes he rents out are lead-free. According to a state complaint, an MDE inspector saw chipping, peeling or flaking paint on the exterior of one of the two properties on Pinkney Street in June. The department had been asked to check out the properties by the city of Annapolis, which also regulates rental housing.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
Lead poisoning, once widespread, appears on the way to becoming a rarity among children living in old rental housing in Baltimore and the rest of Maryland. But the problem is growing among youngsters who live in owner-occupied and newer rental homes, and that is prompting state officials to look for new ways to fight the longtime health scourge. State environmental officials reported Tuesday that the number of Maryland children found last year with harmful levels of lead in their blood declined to 531, down by 22 from the year before and less than 0.5 percent of all youngsters tested.
NEWS
July 10, 2011
I was appalled to learn recently how the three young children of my neighbors on Henrietta Street in Federal Hill were put at risk of lead poisoning. The law allows only contractors who are certified to remove lead-based paint. In this renovation, a certified contractor won a contract for the paint removal and then scooted around the EPA requirement by subcontracting the work. The subcontractor was not certified, and indeed failed to take the required precautions. Lead-based paint dust and debris were spread over the property and neighboring properties.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2011
The dust was thick enough that Sally Dworak-Fisher could trace letters in it with her finger. She feared that particles from rehab work next door were drifting into her Federal Hill home and coating many surfaces — even under the bathroom sink. But when she and other neighbors of the property contacted federal, state and local authorities about concerns that dust at the Henrietta Street house might contain toxic lead, everyone said some other agency was responsible. The residents' complaints, made earlier this month, demonstrate a breakdown at every level of government in the enforcement of laws and regulations meant to protect the public from the hazards of lead-based paint.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2011
Baltimore, where thousands of buildings contain lead-based paint that can poison young children, has lost federal funding for abatement programs due to mismanagement of its most recent grant, officials said Monday. Department of Housing and Urban Development officials told The Baltimore Sun that the city health department failed to fix up enough homes under the latest $4 million grant, which expired in January, and as a result the city was deemed a "high-risk" grantee ineligible to receive more funds.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2010
Though incidences of lead poisoning have declined greatly among children in Baltimore and Maryland in the past two decades, they have not decreased as readily among youngsters who live in homes not covered by the state's lead paint law. More than half the Maryland youngsters found last year with elevated levels of lead in their blood lived in owner-occupied homes or rental units built since 1950, according to a new report by the state Department of...
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Timothy B. Wheeler and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
Two Baltimore lawmakers are backing legislation that would make it easier for victims of lead poisoning to sue manufacturers of lead-based paint for damages. The bill -- which would hold paint manufacturers responsible for harming thousands of Maryland children based on how much lead-based paint they sold in the state -- would help Baltimore attorney Peter G. Angelos pursue two lawsuits he has filed against the pigment industry. Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg said yesterday that he is drafting a bill that would allow "market-share liability" claims against lead-paint manufacturers in Maryland courts.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2010
Starting today, anyone renovating an older home across the country will have to hire a contractor certified to handle lead-based paint under a new federal rule that aims to reduce the number of children poisoned by the toxic metal. The rule affects all homes built before 1978, when lead was banned in paint. The number of children harmed by lead has dropped significantly since then, mainly because it has been banned in consumer products. But the Environmental Protection Agency, which imposed the rule, said a million children a year still suffer effects.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | May 31, 2006
Facing a series of lawsuits over lead paint exposure, the Housing Authority of Baltimore City is trying a novel approach for its defense: Don't bother suing us, because we can't afford to pay. The request for relief - which the plaintiffs' attorney called unprecedented - asks a city judge to rule that the authority "has no funds, and therefore no ability to pay any judgments entered against it in the above-referenced civil actions." To back up their petition, lawyers noted a list of financial woes for the authority - a projected drop of $4 million in federal funding this year, recent layoffs to balance its budget and the dissolution of its police force in 2004.
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