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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
Americans would help finance the towering costs of finding and removing hazardous lead paint from older homes in Baltimore and elsewhere around the country by paying about $15 more for their car batteries, under legislation being introduced in Congress today.Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, D-Md., said the bill he drafted would raise $1 billion a year for lead-paint abatement by levying an excise tax on continuing uses of lead."This legislation provides the only real cure for lead poisoning -- prevention," Cardin said in a statement.
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NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | January 24, 2008
A Baltimore jury ordered an apartment management company to pay $6 million to an 8-year-old boy after determining that he suffered brain damage at his home as a result of exposure to lead-based paint. On Tuesday, the jury found Garden Village Reality Corp. and Regional Management, which operates the Garden Village Apartments where Antonio Ross Jr. lived, negligent. Experts testified during the five-day trial that Antonio lost IQ points and suffered cognitive deficits that affect the way he can recall and organize information in his mind.
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BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | December 4, 1994
Washington -- If the new Congress is seriously looking to limit costly federal regulatory intrusions into ordinary citizens' lives, here's one the lawmakers can catch before it affects millions of home sellers per year: Proposed regulations requiring all sellers of houses built before 1978 -- roughly two-thirds of the nation's housing stock -- to give potential purchasers the equivalent of a written 10-day opt-out period before going to closing.There's more. Under the rules, if sellers fail to provide written disclosure of the potential buyer's new right to the 10-day period, they're subject to federal criminal penalties of up to one year in prison per violation, federal civil penalties of up to $10,000 per violation, plus treble civil damages if a would-be buyer gets really angry and files suit.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO and ROCH KUBATKO,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2005
The frustration of a six-game losing streak is gripping the Orioles almost as hard as reliever Steve Kline's hold on his manager's warm-up jacket last night. So far, only one has let up. Kline was ejected in the eighth inning after being called for a balk, the Orioles" eighth this season, and the New York Yankees turned it into the go-ahead run in a 6-4 victory before 45,801 at Camden Yards that sprinkled a little more controversy over a storied rivalry. Kline spun toward second base umpire Laz Diaz, who made the call that advanced Jorge Posada to second base, then charged plate umpire Marty Foster and pointed a finger in his face.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH R. HARNEY | August 25, 1996
MANY HOMEOWNERS and small-scale property owners may not have the slightest idea about the new legal liability they face starting Sept. 6.On that date, the first of two categories of homes for sale and rent becomes subject to new federal regulations governing lead-based paint. Even if you feel certain that the property you own -- or plan to sell or rent -- doesn't contain lead-based paint, you need to know how the real estate rules change nationwide, first on Sept. 6, and then on Dec. 6.Beginning Sept.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1997
Members of the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants are answering readers' tax questions through April 15.Q. Because of the high lead level that was a danger to my small children, I had to move out of my house for six months last year while the lead was being removed. During that period I had to rent an apartment and also pay my mortgage. Is any of that deductible, or any of the cost of having the lead removed?A. The cost of lead removal is normally a capital expenditure and is added to the basis of your home.
NEWS
By Benjamin L. Cardin | November 29, 1991
EVERY DAY millions of American children breathe and ingest minute particles of lead-based paint that will doom them to a lifetime of ill health and limited achievement. Twenty years ago Congress declared a national mandate to eradicate lead poisoning; yet today lead poisoning affects as many as 4 million children under age 6.The information on lead poisoning is well documented and alarming. Even though the Bush administration has declared lead poisoning "the No. 1 enBenjamin L.Cardinvironmental hazard facing children," 57 million homes still contain some lead-based paint.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1996
Property owners selling or leasing homes built before 1978 must disclose any known lead paint hazards and give buyers up to 10 days to inspect for lead or assess its risks under new federal environmental rules.The requirements took effect Friday for owners of more than four dwellings and will apply to all owners of pre-1978 properties beginning Dec. 6.Property owners and their real estate agents will share &r responsibility for giving out information that could prevent lead poisoning in homes that might contain lead-based paint.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | September 10, 1993
Landlords in Baltimore are obligated to ensure that lead-based paint is not peeling from their buildings, where it can pose health hazards, the state's second highest court has ruled.The Maryland Court of Special Appeals upheld a jury verdict awarding nearly $500,000 to two children who lived in a West Baltimore rowhouse and $18,944 to the estate of their mother, who died of unrelated causes after suing her landlord."The decision squarely puts on the landlords' shoulders the responsibility to safeguard children from exposure to poisoning through lead-based paint," said C. Christopher Brown, an attorney for the children.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | January 24, 2008
A Baltimore jury ordered an apartment management company to pay $6 million to an 8-year-old boy after determining that he suffered brain damage at his home as a result of exposure to lead-based paint. On Tuesday, the jury found Garden Village Reality Corp. and Regional Management, which operates the Garden Village Apartments where Antonio Ross Jr. lived, negligent. Experts testified during the five-day trial that Antonio lost IQ points and suffered cognitive deficits that affect the way he can recall and organize information in his mind.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2003
Despite two weeks of warnings and school officials' repeated promises of compliance, the city's top health official was forced yesterday to fine 36 schools a total of about $4,000 for failing to protect children from possible lead contamination. During inspections yesterday and Wednesday, Health Commissioner Peter L. Beilenson found 39 instances - some schools had more than one violation - in which school administrators had failed to comply with an order to shut off drinking fountains and alert students that hand and kitchen sinks are only for washing hands.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2002
A Baltimore Circuit Court jury awarded $630,000 yesterday to a 9-year-old boy who suffered lead poisoning while he lived in a East Baltimore rowhouse owned by the city housing authority. But getting the full payment may be difficult for the boy's family because the award exceeds the authority's $500,000 insurance limit. J. Marks Moore III, who represents the Housing Authority of Baltimore City in lead paint cases, said he did not know how complex legal issues involving the city's insurance coverage would be resolved.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 26, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In 1792, President George Washington and his secretary of state, Thomas Jefferson, were in Philadelphia, pondering the design of the U.S. Capitol.Determined to send a message that the fledgling democracy commanded respect, Washington decided upon a dome. "It gives beauty and grandeur," he wrote.Now, the world's most visible symbol of democracy is getting a face lift, a $30 million repair job that will seal cracks and other problems in the 135-year-old, cast-iron dome.Beginning in January and continuing over the next four years, workers will strip away the old lead-based paint -- at least 12 coats dating to 1863 -- in favor of a new, rust-free coating.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1997
Members of the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants are answering readers' tax questions through April 15.Q. Because of the high lead level that was a danger to my small children, I had to move out of my house for six months last year while the lead was being removed. During that period I had to rent an apartment and also pay my mortgage. Is any of that deductible, or any of the cost of having the lead removed?A. The cost of lead removal is normally a capital expenditure and is added to the basis of your home.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1996
Property owners selling or leasing homes built before 1978 must disclose any known lead paint hazards and give buyers up to 10 days to inspect for lead or assess its risks under new federal environmental rules.The requirements took effect Friday for owners of more than four dwellings and will apply to all owners of pre-1978 properties beginning Dec. 6.Property owners and their real estate agents will share &r responsibility for giving out information that could prevent lead poisoning in homes that might contain lead-based paint.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH R. HARNEY | August 25, 1996
MANY HOMEOWNERS and small-scale property owners may not have the slightest idea about the new legal liability they face starting Sept. 6.On that date, the first of two categories of homes for sale and rent becomes subject to new federal regulations governing lead-based paint. Even if you feel certain that the property you own -- or plan to sell or rent -- doesn't contain lead-based paint, you need to know how the real estate rules change nationwide, first on Sept. 6, and then on Dec. 6.Beginning Sept.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 26, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In 1792, President George Washington and his secretary of state, Thomas Jefferson, were in Philadelphia, pondering the design of the U.S. Capitol.Determined to send a message that the fledgling democracy commanded respect, Washington decided upon a dome. "It gives beauty and grandeur," he wrote.Now, the world's most visible symbol of democracy is getting a face lift, a $30 million repair job that will seal cracks and other problems in the 135-year-old, cast-iron dome.Beginning in January and continuing over the next four years, workers will strip away the old lead-based paint -- at least 12 coats dating to 1863 -- in favor of a new, rust-free coating.
BUSINESS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | March 5, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When Baltimore County steel painter Roy Gentry started blasting encrusted paint from the eaves of Washington's Old Executive Office Building last summer, he didn't know that a few weeks on the job would send him writhing in agony to a hospital and poison his 2-year-old son.Lyndon Gross, a once-active 25-year-old ironworker from Calvert County, uses a crutch now for his weakened legs and can barely flex his hands after working six months in...
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | August 22, 1995
Q: My 8-month-old son loves to "read" the newspaper with his father -- he crumbles and sometimes chews on the sports and business sections! Someone told me that newsprint contains lead. I worry my son might get lead poisoning. Do I have to keep him away from newspaper?A: We went to the experts on this one, because we also had heard something about newspapers and lead. We are happy to say that your son can remain a subscriber safely.Modern newspapers present no lead poisoning hazard. It was the printing process itself, not the newspaper, that was at one time a problem; and it was a problem for workers, not readers.
NEWS
By EDWIN FEULNER | May 28, 1995
Oh boy, do we have a problem.You see, in the state of Michigan there's this bridge. It's called the Mackinac Bridge. And, like many U.S. bridges, it's painted with lead-based paint.Lead-based paint is bad. If you eat enough of it, you'll get sick. Sort of like if you take the gasoline nozzle and shove it down your throat instead of into your gas tank, you might die. So, we have to repaint this bridge. I don't know what we're going to do about killer gas nozzles.To protect you from Mackinac Bridge Syndrome (MBS)
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