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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
Maryland environmental officials will take surface water samples at Baltimore County's Parkton Landfill late next week in the first phase of a site investigation requested by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.Mike Sullivan, a spokesman for the state Department of the Environment, said the initial tests will sample surface water and sediments from streams on the 217-acre site. Leachate -- rainwater that has percolated through the buried refuse -- will also be sampled.Area residents have long suspected that toxic substances mixed with the household trash have moved into the ground water and threaten their wells.
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NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2004
Among the rolling hills of northern Carroll County, one stands out. Not for what is on it, but for what is under it: thousands of tons of slowly decomposing trash. Since the 88-acre John Owings Landfill closed in 1988, there has been no telltale odor to give away its secret stash. The garbage is contained within layers of lining, clay and dirt. The only evidence of the refuse within the 150-foot-tall hill, which was recapped in 1996, is the occasional wafting of methane gas through the hook-shaped pipes that dot the landscape.
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NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
Howard County officials wearing tennis shoes and wing-tips slogged through the mud of the county's Alpha Ridge landfill yesterday to get a firsthand look at the new plastic-lined cell and the 13-year-old toxin-leaking cell it replaced on Saturday.The tour was requested by County Council Chairwoman Shane Pendergrass, who will preside over the debate over whether to continue using the new cell as is, or find another place to put the county's trash.The last stop of the tour was the "hot spot," where a monitoring well drilled into bedrock produced solvent-contaminated water samples in September.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2000
A federal jury awarded two Baltimore public works employees $178,000 in combined damages yesterday after determining that former Director George G. Balog and a top aide "maliciously, wantonly and oppressively" retaliated against the whistle-blowing underlings. The eight-member civil jury took two hours and 45 minutes after the weeklong trial to return with the verdict and damages. The decision was so unexpectedly quick that Balog, the city's public works director for 12 years, was absent from the courtroom when the verdict was announced.
NEWS
April 27, 1998
Chemical discharge would put profits over the environmentThe White Marsh Civic Association and surrounding communities worked long and hard to get a regulation passed requiring that a liner be installed in all rubble landfills.The purpose of a liner is to help prevent leachate from polluting the ground water. In the past at the Days Cove rubble fill, the operator had the leachate pumped into a tank truck and hauled to the Baltimore County dump station on Reames Road. This system seems to be working very well.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1996
Federal investigators have opened an inquiry into the Quarantine Road Sanitary Landfill just months after a city worker was ousted from his job for publicly raising questions about potentially hazardous pollution caused by shoddy repairs at the landfill.Several current and former employees of the Baltimore Department of Public Works have been interviewed by the FBI -- some more than once -- and subpoenas have been issued for records relating to the questionable repairs.Sources familiar with the investigation say two high-ranking public works officials were asked to chronicle the repairs, which cost nearly twice the $62,000 estimate.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
Minute amounts of Freon-type chemicals have appeared for the first time in wells along the eastern side of the Millersville landfill.Officials said the amounts found in the test wells -- 10 parts per billion -- are barely detectable and pose no threat to the landfill's neighbors.The compounds are used as refrigerants and in spray-can propellants. They were first detected in about five test wells on landfill property in November, said James Pittman, who oversees the county's 567-acre landfill.
NEWS
March 13, 1993
The Parkton landfill saga continues to take odd twists and turns, a decade after the 217-acre dump in northern Baltimore County was closed.For several years, Parkton residents living near the landfill have said the facility was leaking contaminants into the local water table. Private tests supported these claims.Maryland environmental officials say the water is polluted, in part because of the landfill, while the county contends it hasn't found undue contamination in area wells. Yet the federal Environmental RTC Protection Agency determined last year that groundwater near the landfill poses an "increased cancer risk."
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1998
A three-member panel of federal appeals judges in Richmond, Va., has ruled that top-ranking city Department of Public Works leaders must face a civil trial over allegations that they violated the civil rights of two city employees critical of a controversial landfill repair project.The ruling from the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals late Thursday evening overturns a ruling by U.S District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin in Baltimore. Smalkin had ruled that city administrators, because they are government officials, were protected by immunity in their comments and actions.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2000
A federal jury awarded two Baltimore public works employees $178,000 in combined damages yesterday after determining that former Director George G. Balog and a top aide "maliciously, wantonly and oppressively" retaliated against the whistle-blowing underlings. The eight-member civil jury took two hours and 45 minutes after the weeklong trial to return with the verdict and damages. The decision was so unexpectedly quick that Balog, the city's public works director for 12 years, was absent from the courtroom when the verdict was announced.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1998
A three-member panel of federal appeals judges in Richmond, Va., has ruled that top-ranking city Department of Public Works leaders must face a civil trial over allegations that they violated the civil rights of two city employees critical of a controversial landfill repair project.The ruling from the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals late Thursday evening overturns a ruling by U.S District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin in Baltimore. Smalkin had ruled that city administrators, because they are government officials, were protected by immunity in their comments and actions.
NEWS
April 27, 1998
Chemical discharge would put profits over the environmentThe White Marsh Civic Association and surrounding communities worked long and hard to get a regulation passed requiring that a liner be installed in all rubble landfills.The purpose of a liner is to help prevent leachate from polluting the ground water. In the past at the Days Cove rubble fill, the operator had the leachate pumped into a tank truck and hauled to the Baltimore County dump station on Reames Road. This system seems to be working very well.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1996
Federal investigators have opened an inquiry into the Quarantine Road Sanitary Landfill just months after a city worker was ousted from his job for publicly raising questions about potentially hazardous pollution caused by shoddy repairs at the landfill.Several current and former employees of the Baltimore Department of Public Works have been interviewed by the FBI -- some more than once -- and subpoenas have been issued for records relating to the questionable repairs.Sources familiar with the investigation say two high-ranking public works officials were asked to chronicle the repairs, which cost nearly twice the $62,000 estimate.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
Minute amounts of Freon-type chemicals have appeared for the first time in wells along the eastern side of the Millersville landfill.Officials said the amounts found in the test wells -- 10 parts per billion -- are barely detectable and pose no threat to the landfill's neighbors.The compounds are used as refrigerants and in spray-can propellants. They were first detected in about five test wells on landfill property in November, said James Pittman, who oversees the county's 567-acre landfill.
NEWS
March 13, 1993
The Parkton landfill saga continues to take odd twists and turns, a decade after the 217-acre dump in northern Baltimore County was closed.For several years, Parkton residents living near the landfill have said the facility was leaking contaminants into the local water table. Private tests supported these claims.Maryland environmental officials say the water is polluted, in part because of the landfill, while the county contends it hasn't found undue contamination in area wells. Yet the federal Environmental RTC Protection Agency determined last year that groundwater near the landfill poses an "increased cancer risk."
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
Howard County officials wearing tennis shoes and wing-tips slogged through the mud of the county's Alpha Ridge landfill yesterday to get a firsthand look at the new plastic-lined cell and the 13-year-old toxin-leaking cell it replaced on Saturday.The tour was requested by County Council Chairwoman Shane Pendergrass, who will preside over the debate over whether to continue using the new cell as is, or find another place to put the county's trash.The last stop of the tour was the "hot spot," where a monitoring well drilled into bedrock produced solvent-contaminated water samples in September.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2004
Among the rolling hills of northern Carroll County, one stands out. Not for what is on it, but for what is under it: thousands of tons of slowly decomposing trash. Since the 88-acre John Owings Landfill closed in 1988, there has been no telltale odor to give away its secret stash. The garbage is contained within layers of lining, clay and dirt. The only evidence of the refuse within the 150-foot-tall hill, which was recapped in 1996, is the occasional wafting of methane gas through the hook-shaped pipes that dot the landscape.
NEWS
December 24, 1996
An article in yesterday's Maryland section about disposal of construction debris incorrectly listed a landfill in Washington County among six that have no liners to prevent toxics from entering the ground water. The Washington County Rubble Landfill has a liner and a leachate collection system so that any toxics can be removed during water treatment.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 12/24/96
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
Maryland environmental officials will take surface water samples at Baltimore County's Parkton Landfill late next week in the first phase of a site investigation requested by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.Mike Sullivan, a spokesman for the state Department of the Environment, said the initial tests will sample surface water and sediments from streams on the 217-acre site. Leachate -- rainwater that has percolated through the buried refuse -- will also be sampled.Area residents have long suspected that toxic substances mixed with the household trash have moved into the ground water and threaten their wells.
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