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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 6, 2002
PARIS - French President Jacques Chirac was re-elected in a landslide last night as France ended its flirtation with the ultra-conservative right and rejected the anti-immigrant firebrand Jean-Marie Le Pen. The move to the center occurred after two weeks of national soul-searching and international humiliation that followed last month's first round of presidential voting, when Le Pen was elevated from the political fringe and scored a second-place finish...
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NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 23, 2007
PARIS -- In a crucial vote that drew a huge turnout, Nicolas Sarkozy and Segolene Royal finished first and second in yesterday's opening round of balloting for the French presidency. They will face each other in a May 6 runoff to succeed Jacques Chirac, the incumbent. Sarkozy, the candidate from Chirac's center-right party, received 30 percent of the vote, according to exit polls and partial results. Royal, the Socialist Party candidate and the first woman with a serious chance of winning the French presidency, received 24 percent.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 2, 2002
PARIS - Waving homemade placards and chanting "No to fascism," more than 1 million people took to the streets across France yesterday in May Day demonstrations aimed at the far-right presidential candidate, Jean-Marie Le Pen. The turnout, including 400,000 in Paris, was far larger than predicted and dwarfed the 10,000 to 15,000 people who gathered in an early morning show of support for Le Pen. The marches were watched carefully here as an opportunity to...
NEWS
By Sebastian Rotella and Sebastian Rotella,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 15, 2007
PARIS -- Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy accepted the presidential nomination of the ruling center-right party yesterday, promising to break with the past and setting up a high-stakes campaign that is likely to open a new era in French politics. The overwhelming vote by the members of the Union for a Popular Movement culminated a drive by Sarkozy that overcame an intraparty rift with an old guard loyal to President Jacques Chirac, 73, who has been in office since 1995. Although Sarkozy's plain-spoken, hard-charging, crime-fighter image has made him one of France's most popular leaders, he faces a tough challenge from Segolene Royal, a Socialist Party newcomer making an energetic bid to become the nation's first female president.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 5, 2002
PARIS -- Emmanuel Rothe favors France, family and Jean-Marie Le Pen, the extreme right-wing politician whose candidacy in today's French presidential runoff has horrified much of Europe. To hear Rothe and other supporters of Le Pen describe this election, they are backing a candidate determined to reduce crime, restore family values and return France to greatness. They back change, they say, not his National Front's barely camouflaged racism directed against immigrants. "Why fear the National Front more than the Communists?"
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By Patrick Jarreau and Patrick Jarreau,Special to The Sun | April 28, 2002
Against all odds, the run-off round of the French presidential election next Sunday will not be between the partners of "cohabitation," the incumbent President Jacques Chirac, candidate of the right-wing parties, and Prime Minister Lionel Jospin, who has been leading for five years a government supported by a left in Parliament. With only 16.18% of the vote, Jospin was eliminated in the first round by far-rightist leader Jean-Marie Le Pen, who beat him by less than a percentage point. So, for the first time in French political history, a far-right-wing candidate will be in the final run-off.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 25, 1999
MARIGNANE, France -- Accusing him of behaving like an aging tyrant and siphoning off party finances to pay for a lavish lifestyle, followers of Europe's most notorious right-wing figure, Jean-Marie Le Pen, plunged his party into crisis yesterday by splitting it into rival factions.Meeting in a municipal basketball and handball arena in this industrial suburb of Marseilles, 2,300 rebel members of the 70-year-old ex-paratrooper's extremist National Front elected Bruno Megret, 49, a former high-ranking civil servant and Le Pen's estranged lieutenant, as their president.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2002
PARIS - Thousands of people took to the streets across France yesterday in growing protests at the unexpected success of the extreme rightist Jean-Marie Le Pen in qualifying to face President Jacques Chirac in the final round of the French presidential elections next month. High school students marched out of classrooms in Lyon, Strasbourg, Reims, Rouen, Angers and Besancon to hold rallies against Le Pen. Students chanted slogans equating Le Pen with Adolf Hitler and calling his National Front a fascist organization.
NEWS
April 24, 2002
FOR THE NEXT two weeks, France, and the world, will witness the spectacle of an extreme nationalist right-winger as one of two candidates for president. Jean-Marie Le Pen, whose National Front party is built on poisonous resentments, shocked the nation by coming in second in Sunday's first round of balloting, edging out the Socialist prime minister, Lionel Jospin. Mr. Le Pen stands virtually no chance of winning in his face-off with Jacques Chirac, the incumbent, on May 5. But simply by getting to the second round, and muscling the left out of the race entirely, he has set off alarm bells throughout European politics.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2006
PARIS -- France's far-right political party, the National Front, has emerged stronger than ever from the civil unrest that has beset the country in the past six months, a new survey shows, suggesting that the party could play a major role in the presidential election next year. The National Front's outspoken and vehemently anti-immigration leader, Jean-Marie Le Pen, has had occasional bursts of support before: Four years ago, he made it to the runoff for president, losing to President Jacques Chirac.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2006
PARIS -- France's far-right political party, the National Front, has emerged stronger than ever from the civil unrest that has beset the country in the past six months, a new survey shows, suggesting that the party could play a major role in the presidential election next year. The National Front's outspoken and vehemently anti-immigration leader, Jean-Marie Le Pen, has had occasional bursts of support before: Four years ago, he made it to the runoff for president, losing to President Jacques Chirac.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | January 11, 2006
PARIS -- The French have had two months to sort out the lessons of last fall's riots in predominantly Muslim neighborhoods. Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin says the rioting was caused by racial bias, lack of business opportunity and insufficient education for immigrant children. He vows tax breaks for business, better education for immigrant children and tougher enforcement of anti-bias laws. For this conclusion, the French media, which are more left-wing than the American press, praised him. The founder and leader of France's Front National (FN)
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2002
Pim Fortuyn was not merely the leader of a far-right political party in the Netherlands before he was assassinated last week. He was a political rock star, a gay man who was open about his sexuality and a public figure who enjoyed the flamboyant gesture. ("I will borrow that handbag from Margaret Thatcher, bang it on the table, and say, `I want my money back!'" he once replied famously to a question about bloated government.) He was a spaniel-loving eccentric who favored glittery clubs, chauffeur-driven luxury cars and suits as sharp as his rhetoric.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 8, 2002
ROTTERDAM, Netherlands -- Outside the austere brick house where slain right-wing political leader Pim Fortuyn lived, thousands of grief-stricken citizens piled their flowers and cards yesterday beneath a light post adorned with a handmade sign: "It's a bloody shame." They came to honor the life of a fiery populist they had only recently come to know and to reflect on the troubled times facing their country. "He woke us up," said Brenda Reimerink, 21, dressed in black, carrying roses. "He said things everyone else believed.
NEWS
May 7, 2002
IN FRANCE, the extreme nationalist candidate Jean-Marie Le Pen lost his bid for the presidency Sunday but pulled in more votes than he had ever received and left no one in doubt that right-wing discontent is a force to be reckoned with in Europe. In the Netherlands, Mr. Le Pen's counterpart was assassinated yesterday, just nine days before general elections there. European politics haven't looked this grim in a long time. Pim Fortuyn, who was shot and killed as he was leaving a Dutch radio station, objected to the comparison with Mr. Le Pen. He was openly gay, for one thing, and he said he wanted to preserve the Dutch tradition of tolerance, not obliterate it. But his proposed means?
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 7, 2002
PARIS - Moving quickly to capitalize on his landslide re-election victory, President Jacques Chirac named yesterday a new center-right prime minister, Jean-Pierre Raffarin, to restore his conservative base and lead his party into the crucial legislative elections next month. Chirac made the appointment after the Socialist prime minister, Lionel Jospin, officially handed in his resignation yesterday. Jospin said last month that he would retire after being knocked out of the first round of the presidential vote by the surprising showing of the extremist Jean-Marie Le Pen. In choosing Raffarin, Chirac, who defeated Le Pen on Sunday by the widest margin in French history, signaled that he had heard the anger of French voters at the Paris-based government elite.
NEWS
May 7, 2002
IN FRANCE, the extreme nationalist candidate Jean-Marie Le Pen lost his bid for the presidency Sunday but pulled in more votes than he had ever received and left no one in doubt that right-wing discontent is a force to be reckoned with in Europe. In the Netherlands, Mr. Le Pen's counterpart was assassinated yesterday, just nine days before general elections there. European politics haven't looked this grim in a long time. Pim Fortuyn, who was shot and killed as he was leaving a Dutch radio station, objected to the comparison with Mr. Le Pen. He was openly gay, for one thing, and he said he wanted to preserve the Dutch tradition of tolerance, not obliterate it. But his proposed means?
NEWS
By Hugh De Santis | May 5, 2002
ALEXANDRIA, Va. - Jacques Chirac should easily defeat extreme rightist Jean-Marie Le Pen in today's presidential elections in France. But neither Mr. Le Pen nor the public mood of insecurity that helped propel him into the second round is likely to soon fade. Moreover, his success could embolden nationalistic and xenophobic parties elsewhere in Europe. The outcome of today's election is not in doubt. Eager to restore the nation's dignity, voters on the left as well as the center will heed the admonition of political leaders to reject the extreme right.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 7, 2002
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - Pim Fortuyn, a maverick right-wing populist and a leading candidate in next week's national elections, was shot and killed last night, shocking a country that sees itself as a peaceful and equitable place and raising the specter of violence stalking European politics. Fortuyn, 54, was a flamboyant and openly gay former sociology professor who stunned the Dutch political establishment this spring when he won power in the country's second city, Rotterdam, with the same strong anti-immigrant message that has helped propel a resurgent far right to political triumphs in Austria, Denmark, Belgium and, through Jean-Marie Le Pen, in France.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 6, 2002
PARIS - French President Jacques Chirac was re-elected in a landslide last night as France ended its flirtation with the ultra-conservative right and rejected the anti-immigrant firebrand Jean-Marie Le Pen. The move to the center occurred after two weeks of national soul-searching and international humiliation that followed last month's first round of presidential voting, when Le Pen was elevated from the political fringe and scored a second-place finish...
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