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By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 11, 2005
LONDON - A day after hijackers plowed airplanes into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and then into a farmer's field in rural Pennsylvania, the reaction by most of the world was summed up neatly by a single headline. The headline, on the front page of the French newspaper Le Monde, was this: "We are all Americans." In only four words, Le Monde managed to convey several messages: of empathy, of solidarity and of strength. It was not only newspapers that expressed support for the United States.
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NEWS
September 16, 2005
Misguided effort to attack Israel and America One misguided column can be dismissed but two on the same day presents a pattern that calls for a response. Such was the case on Tuesday, with the columns by G. Jefferson Price III ("Exploitation of synagogues scars exit from Gaza," Opinion * Commentary, Sept. 13) and Trudy Rubin ("Katrina debacle flattens America's image abroad," Opinion Commentary, Sept. 13) that appeared in The Sun. Mr. Price criticizes Israel for not destroying the synagogues it had built in its Gaza settlements.
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NEWS
June 3, 2002
Nathan Smith, 65, who managed one of the last remaining Bowery flophouses, died of cancer May 26 in New York. For more than 16 years, Mr. Smith lived at the Sunshine Hotel on the Bowery, a New York street that was once notorious as a home to alcoholics and drifters. The Sunshine, which opened in the early 1920s, provided a place for men down on their luck to sleep for $10 a night. In recent years, Mr. Smith was featured in a documentary on the Bowery on National Public Radio and in a book, Flophouse: Life on the Bowery.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 11, 2005
LONDON - A day after hijackers plowed airplanes into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and then into a farmer's field in rural Pennsylvania, the reaction by most of the world was summed up neatly by a single headline. The headline, on the front page of the French newspaper Le Monde, was this: "We are all Americans." In only four words, Le Monde managed to convey several messages: of empathy, of solidarity and of strength. It was not only newspapers that expressed support for the United States.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 28, 1997
LONDON -- It's been some month for Diana, Princess of Wales.She took three Mediterranean cruises with her millionaire friend, Dodi Al Fayed, squeezed in a trip to Bosnia to tout her favored cause -- banning land mines -- and then entered the British political fray during a daring interview that appeared yesterday in the French newspaper, Le Monde.And today marks the first anniversary of her divorce from Prince Charles, heir to the British throne.Diana's latest interview landed her in hot water when she was quoted as praising the British Labor government's support for her campaign against land mines.
NEWS
By Nicholas King | October 6, 1990
NEW YORK is a newspaper-reading city. The famous subway folding of broadsheet papers, to read a half-slice of a page at a time to save space, is a hallmark of the New York commuter.The tabloid Daily News, the biggest metropolitan daily in the country, the New York Post and, increasingly, Newsday are the fare of most subway and bus riders, at least in the Bronx and Brooklyn. When the passengers from the fashionable districts of Manhattan crowd through the doors and into the aisles, the newspaper look changes.
NEWS
September 16, 2005
Misguided effort to attack Israel and America One misguided column can be dismissed but two on the same day presents a pattern that calls for a response. Such was the case on Tuesday, with the columns by G. Jefferson Price III ("Exploitation of synagogues scars exit from Gaza," Opinion * Commentary, Sept. 13) and Trudy Rubin ("Katrina debacle flattens America's image abroad," Opinion Commentary, Sept. 13) that appeared in The Sun. Mr. Price criticizes Israel for not destroying the synagogues it had built in its Gaza settlements.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | October 3, 2002
WASHINGTON -- It's hard to believe that just a year ago, in the wake of 9/11, the French newspaper Le Monde carried the headline "We are all Americans now." What a difference a year makes. Today, I figured, that headline would probably read: "We are all anti-Americans now." So I called Alain Frachon, the senior editor of Le Monde, and asked him how his paper was viewing America today. I was close. He said: "The same columnist who wrote that piece a year ago on 9/11 wrote another one this year on the first anniversary.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | September 22, 1998
WE HAVE been taken hostage by independent counsel Kenneth Starr's report.Not just us. The whole world, too.While the global economy sickens and real terrorists rejoice, the House Judiciary Committee homes in on the president's sex life. We could be talking months of hearings in the House of Representatives, more witnesses, an ugly public circus -- before any decision on impeachment. The nation's capital obsessing over tabloid trash.Meanwhile, the White House will remain paralyzed as Asia, Russia and the Latins slip further into economic turmoil.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | September 16, 1996
PARIS -- Three years ago, in a book on nationalism, I remarked that while science progresses, and our society has steadily become more complex, the moral nature of man has not changed. I wrote that it seemed to me ''a preposterous and impertinent notion'' that I should today somehow be a moral superior to the men and women who made the great cave paintings of prehistory, or the dramatists and poets of classical Greece.A critic (Liah Greenfeld of Boston University) demanded that I clarify what I meant by this, and my reply turned into an article published last winter in the New York quarterly, World Policy Journal, and subsequently reprinted by a French quarterly magazine, Commentaire, under the title, ''Progress -- Reflections on a Dead Idea.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 16, 2004
FIGEAC, France - As far as the race goes, Lance Armstrong is confident. As far as the drug talk goes, Armstrong is spitting mad. On a day when the temperature climbed to near 100 degrees by the end of the Tour de France's 11th stage, a furious Armstrong, trying to become the first man to win the race six times in a row, accused a French television journalist of stalking his hotel room and wearily shook his head at harsh words from Greg LeMond, the...
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | October 3, 2002
WASHINGTON -- It's hard to believe that just a year ago, in the wake of 9/11, the French newspaper Le Monde carried the headline "We are all Americans now." What a difference a year makes. Today, I figured, that headline would probably read: "We are all anti-Americans now." So I called Alain Frachon, the senior editor of Le Monde, and asked him how his paper was viewing America today. I was close. He said: "The same columnist who wrote that piece a year ago on 9/11 wrote another one this year on the first anniversary.
NEWS
June 3, 2002
Nathan Smith, 65, who managed one of the last remaining Bowery flophouses, died of cancer May 26 in New York. For more than 16 years, Mr. Smith lived at the Sunshine Hotel on the Bowery, a New York street that was once notorious as a home to alcoholics and drifters. The Sunshine, which opened in the early 1920s, provided a place for men down on their luck to sleep for $10 a night. In recent years, Mr. Smith was featured in a documentary on the Bowery on National Public Radio and in a book, Flophouse: Life on the Bowery.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | September 22, 1998
WE HAVE been taken hostage by independent counsel Kenneth Starr's report.Not just us. The whole world, too.While the global economy sickens and real terrorists rejoice, the House Judiciary Committee homes in on the president's sex life. We could be talking months of hearings in the House of Representatives, more witnesses, an ugly public circus -- before any decision on impeachment. The nation's capital obsessing over tabloid trash.Meanwhile, the White House will remain paralyzed as Asia, Russia and the Latins slip further into economic turmoil.
NEWS
September 7, 1997
Princess Diana was the hostess.Yes, the princess would see me - at 11 a.m. sharp, the fax specified. She was at home - at Kensington Palace - relaxed, independent. It was probably the only place where she didn't risk being targeted by camera zooms.She was wearing a short, sleeveless dress, matching her eyes, unless they were reflecting its color. She wore a necklace of large pearls, high heels and a quiet assurance demonstrated by her smile and her friendly way of proffering her hand. Above all, she seemed free, and her simplicity was a nice surprise coming from someone whom protocol dictates should be addressed as "Ma'am."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 28, 1997
LONDON -- It's been some month for Diana, Princess of Wales.She took three Mediterranean cruises with her millionaire friend, Dodi Al Fayed, squeezed in a trip to Bosnia to tout her favored cause -- banning land mines -- and then entered the British political fray during a daring interview that appeared yesterday in the French newspaper, Le Monde.And today marks the first anniversary of her divorce from Prince Charles, heir to the British throne.Diana's latest interview landed her in hot water when she was quoted as praising the British Labor government's support for her campaign against land mines.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | November 21, 1991
When INXS released its last studio album, "X," 16 months ago, the group's intention was to play stadiums in the United States by summer.Coming off the mega-platinum success of 1988's "Kick" and its subsequent tour, those expectations did not seem the least bit ridiculous.Instead, after "X" stopped short of reaching its goals and the second U.S. swing of the tour was scrapped, INXS announced the release of a live album from the tour to be released in time for Christmas.However, the arrival of "Live Baby Live" (in stores now)
NEWS
By William Pfaff | July 8, 1996
PARIS -- The recent G-7 economic summit ended with a little-reported acknowledgment of the troubles and inequities provoked by globalization of the economy.The final communique spoke of the ''risks of aggravated inequalities in the poor countries and of marginalization in certain world regions'' -- the latter an allusion to Africa. It said that while the goal of the advanced countries was ''as wide a distribution as possible of the benefits of economic growth,'' even there ''the risk of excluding individuals and social groups'' is serious.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | September 16, 1996
PARIS -- Three years ago, in a book on nationalism, I remarked that while science progresses, and our society has steadily become more complex, the moral nature of man has not changed. I wrote that it seemed to me ''a preposterous and impertinent notion'' that I should today somehow be a moral superior to the men and women who made the great cave paintings of prehistory, or the dramatists and poets of classical Greece.A critic (Liah Greenfeld of Boston University) demanded that I clarify what I meant by this, and my reply turned into an article published last winter in the New York quarterly, World Policy Journal, and subsequently reprinted by a French quarterly magazine, Commentaire, under the title, ''Progress -- Reflections on a Dead Idea.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | July 8, 1996
PARIS -- The recent G-7 economic summit ended with a little-reported acknowledgment of the troubles and inequities provoked by globalization of the economy.The final communique spoke of the ''risks of aggravated inequalities in the poor countries and of marginalization in certain world regions'' -- the latter an allusion to Africa. It said that while the goal of the advanced countries was ''as wide a distribution as possible of the benefits of economic growth,'' even there ''the risk of excluding individuals and social groups'' is serious.
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