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April 18, 2014
Kevin Kallaugher's cartoon on LBJ's legacy is so far off the mark that it fails to be remotely humorous ( "Dogged opposition," April 13). He uses two presidents, each tainted by their racism and prejudice, to paint the tea party as racist. Lyndon B. Johnson was morally bankrupt, accepting a Silver Star and wearing it the rest of his life when, in truth, he never earned it. The Silver Star is only earned for valor in combat, and LBJ was never in combat. He served briefly in the Pacific Theatre of World War II but was never exposed to enemy contact.
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NEWS
Jules Witcover | August 15, 2014
In the flurry of new books on the Nixon tapes, another allegation worse than Watergate against the late president has been revisited by a researcher at the Miller Center of the University of Virginia, reviving charges of a possible treasonous act by Richard Nixon during the Vietnam war. Ken Hughes, in "Chasing Shadows: The Nixon Tapes, the Chennault Affair and the Origins of Watergate," makes the case that a planned break-in of the Brookings Institution in Washington, which Nixon urged as a blatant "thievery," sought to find and get rid of such evidence.
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FEATURES
By Michael Hill | September 30, 1991
PBS' "American Experience" begins a four-hour biography of Lyndon B. Johnson with two hours of "LBJ" tonight at 9 o'clock on channels 22 and 67. The second half is tomorrow at 9 p.m.This documentary dabbles little in amateur psychoanalysis or complex theories, but its straightforward accounting is full of resonance and depth.At times Johnson seems like "Citizen Kane," with complexities that belied his quest for the simple love of a distant mother. He seems alternately like the basest of politicians and the noblest of philosophers.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
When Samuel L. Morison of Crofton was charged this week with stealing documents from the U.S. Navy's archive in Washington, it was a rare event for the facility. "There has not been a theft like this in recent memory," said Paul Taylor, a spokesman for the Naval History and Heritage Command, from whose collection Morison allegedly took three boxes of files used by his grandfather, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Samuel Eliot Morison. Theft is a very real danger within the quiet rooms of the nation's historical research facilities.
NEWS
By John P. Sears | January 28, 1992
TWENTY-FOUR YEARS AGO, I sat in the gallery of the House of Representatives and watched President Johnson give what turned out to be his last State of the Union Address. He had been elected in a landslide in 1964, and the standard political logic of the day had it that LBJ was such an astute politician, such a master of Congress, such an expert in the manipulation of the levers of power that he could not be beaten in 1968 even though his job rating had been slowly deteriorating.I quickly lost interest in the substance of the speech -- it was the typical combination of self-congratulation, puffery and outright lies that the people had come to expect from President Johnson.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | January 22, 1993
AUSTIN, Texas -- While Americans welcomed a new president this week, some people are remembering the passing of a former president: Lyndon B. Johnson, who died 20 years ago -- on Jan. 22, 1973.To mark the event, the LBJ Library and Museum in Austin is showing a video of how the nation paid its last respects to Johnson.That's not the only museum display with special relevance this week. As Bill Clinton was sworn in as the nation's 42nd president Wednesday in Washington, two holy books on display at the LBJ Library reminded visitors of when Johnson took his oaths of office:After the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Johnson took his first presidential oath in November 1963 aboard Air Force One. He was sworn in on the Kennedy family's Catholic missal, a book of prayers and rites.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When Chief Justice Earl Warren refused to head a presidential commission to investigate the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson applied his legendary arm-twisting tactics.Mr. Johnson made various appeals to Mr. Warren's patriotism, finally expressing fears that post-assassination panic could trigger a nuclear confrontation with the Soviet Union. As LBJ told it, the chief justice "started crying" and caved in.The browbeating, folksiness and gruff charm of LBJ spring to life in newly released transcripts of his taped telephone conversations in the first 35 days of his presidency nearly 30 years ago.In the documents made public yesterday, Mr. Johnson grapples with Republican opposition to a civil rights bill, rides herd on legislation for higher education, counts votes in Congress and seeks advice on Vietnam, Cuba and other foreign hot spots.
NEWS
By MIKE BOWLER and MIKE BOWLER,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1999
JOHNSON CITY, Texas -- The county is Blanco, and it's about the only thing hereabout that's not named for Lyndon Baines Johnson or his family.The local public school, naturally, is LBJ Elementary. It's where the 36th president went to grade school, though he learned to read at age 4 in a one-room school 14 miles and a million flowering bluebonnets west of here.It was in that school, now restored, that Johnson signed the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. The "original education president," the National Park Service guide tells a group of us on tour, signed 50 major pieces of school legislation and believed "the only valid passport from poverty is an education."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and By Joseph R.L. Sterne,Special to the Sun | October 27, 2002
Take a biographer already trailing clouds of controversy. Have him write the third volume of a monumental work about an American president seemingly destined to be loved and hated for reasons as conflicted as the author and his subject. And what you get is a donnybrook in the book-reviewing fraternity that often reveals as much about the reviewer as the book. Such has been the case about the nonfiction event of the year, Robert L. Caro's The Years of Lyndon Johnson: Master of the Senate.
NEWS
By SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS | November 12, 2004
SAN ANTONIO - Almost completely recovered from a wound left by a piece of shrapnel that had missed his heart by half an inch, the Army staff sergeant was just a few days away from getting shipped back to Vietnam. So, the night of June 14, 1968, William Swoveland pulled himself out of his bunk and sat down to write a letter. "I have seen my men hurt and killed and sometimes it seems there's no reason for it," Swoveland wrote. "All of the civilians who have died in Saigon and yet we can't bomb [the enemy's]
NEWS
April 18, 2014
Kevin Kallaugher's cartoon on LBJ's legacy is so far off the mark that it fails to be remotely humorous ( "Dogged opposition," April 13). He uses two presidents, each tainted by their racism and prejudice, to paint the tea party as racist. Lyndon B. Johnson was morally bankrupt, accepting a Silver Star and wearing it the rest of his life when, in truth, he never earned it. The Silver Star is only earned for valor in combat, and LBJ was never in combat. He served briefly in the Pacific Theatre of World War II but was never exposed to enemy contact.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 22, 2013
Among the greatest ironies of President John F. Kennedy's fateful visit to Texas in late November 1963 was that it was a political mission to resolve a rift among Texas Democrats looking toward his own re-election bid in 1964. The chief political beneficiary of Kennedy's assassination was the state's most prominent and powerful Democrat, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson. LBJ did not favor the Kennedy trip and essentially was bypassed on the decision to make it. Until the fatal shots were fired as the Kennedy party was driven through downtown Dallas, the principal story line about the visit was whether a feud between liberal Texas Sen. Ralph Yarborough and Gov. John B. Connally, a close Johnson friend, could be smoothed over, to assure Kennedy's re-election in 1964.
NEWS
January 31, 2013
Jules Witcover's commentary ("Don't count Biden out in 2016," Jan. 29) contrasts the vice president's potency with former vice presidents who had little influence or significance in American history. Indeed, when Lyndon Johnson was broached by John Kennedy in 1960 to be Kennedy's running mate, LBJ allegedly asked his mentor and fellow Texan, John Nance Garner, about the vice presidency. Garner, who was Roosevelt's veep between 1933 and 1941, allegedly replied, "Lyndon, the vice presidency isn't worth a bucket of spit!"
NEWS
By Steven Hill | September 24, 2009
After President Barack Obama's speech on health care earlier this month, pundits have compared his performance to that of President Harry "give 'em hell" Truman. After his election, they compared him to Abraham Lincoln and Franklin Roosevelt. But for the upcoming health care battle, Mr. Obama needs to step into the shoes of President Lyndon Baines Johnson. For LBJ's brawling, Southern style of trench politics is best suited for Mr. Obama's challenge, especially when it comes to lining up votes from recalcitrant members of his own party.
NEWS
By Elaine Woo and Elaine Woo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 2007
Lady Bird Johnson, the widow of Lyndon B. Johnson, whose tumultuous presidency often overshadowed her considerable achievements as an activist first lady and environmentalist, died yesterday at her home in Austin, Texas. She was 94. Mrs. Johnson, who suffered a major stroke in 2002 and had been in failing health for several years, died surrounded by family and friends, including daughters Lynda Johnson Robb and Luci Baines Johnson, said family spokeswoman Elizabeth Christian. As the wife of the 36th president, Mrs. Johnson was often portrayed by contemporaries and some historians as a meek woman who silently endured her husband's volcanic outbursts and infidelities.
NEWS
By SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS | November 12, 2004
SAN ANTONIO - Almost completely recovered from a wound left by a piece of shrapnel that had missed his heart by half an inch, the Army staff sergeant was just a few days away from getting shipped back to Vietnam. So, the night of June 14, 1968, William Swoveland pulled himself out of his bunk and sat down to write a letter. "I have seen my men hurt and killed and sometimes it seems there's no reason for it," Swoveland wrote. "All of the civilians who have died in Saigon and yet we can't bomb [the enemy's]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul Duke and By Paul Duke,Special to the Sun | April 28, 2002
The first two books in Robert Caro's monumental study of Lyndon Baines Johnson were greeted with outrage from many long-time friends and associates of the 36th President. Much too negative, they groused. The angry partisans accused Caro of making Johnson out to be an unprincipled monster whose Texas political career had been launched on a wave of questionable and corrupt actions. Now, in the third volume in the series, Caro has moved on to Johnson's arrival in the Senate in 1948 and his rapid rise to national fame as Democratic leader from 1953 to 1961.
NEWS
September 8, 1994
Susan Threadgill writes in the July/August issue of The Washington Monthly magazine:"H.R. 'Bob' Haldeman's recent diaries are chock full of seamy details about the presidency of Richard M. Nixon."One of the seamiest is the hitherto unknown story of how Nixon tried to blackmail Lyndon Johnson into using his influence with congressional Democrats to help halt the Watergate investigation."Nixon had threatened to reveal that Johnson had bugged him during the 1968 campaign. But Johnson let Nixon know that if Nixon did that, LBJ would release what the diaries then refer to as 'deleted material -- national security.
FEATURES
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2003
In the mid-1970s, beginning work on the first volume of his monumental biography of Lyndon Johnson, Robert A. Caro moved for three years with his wife and indefatigable researcher, Ina, from New York to the Texas Hill Country where Johnson had grown up. "I realized that was a world I didn't understand, and I was never going to get to understand it unless I lived there," says Caro, a New Yorker. "It was a land of great isolation, loneliness and poverty when Johnson was growing up there."
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 18, 2003
WASHINGTON - Ah, summer vacation. The beach? Camping? Perhaps a week off in the city, catching a show or museum? Or how about lugging a chain saw around for hours in 100-degree heat, chopping up cedar trees? Ah, summer vacation for President Bush. The president chooses to unwind during August in a furnace called central Texas, and his most cherished pastime there is "clearing brush" on his 1,600-acre ranch. This summertime hobby, he has said, along with fishing and jogging, helps him relieve his job stress.
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