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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | June 19, 2000
NEW YORK -- So far it's been pretty much a honeymoon for Rep. Rick Lazio in his debut as the Republican nominee for the U.S. Senate seat against Democrat Hillary Clinton. His boyish, open good looks and easy smile are well on the way to making him a new media star, and many New York Republicans express relief that the controversial Mayor Rudy Giuliani is off the ticket. The latest poll by Quinnipiac University about a week ago showed Mr. Lazio catapulting into a flat 44-44 percent tie with the first lady, but the same survey indicated much of his support was anti-Hillary.
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NEWS
May 26, 2000
THE WITHDRAWAL of Rudolph W. Giuliani from a candidacy he had never declared transforms the election for New York senator from a battle of outsized personalities into a partisan clash of ideas and issues. That's what politics in a democracy is supposed to be. Before, the race was turning on whom the voters despised more, Gotham City's Mayor Giuliani or first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. After, it turns on whether New Yorkers choose a liberal Democrat or conservative Republican to represent them, even whether they want a Democratic or Republican majority in the Senate.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | November 12, 2000
When Congress headed home from Capitol Hill for the election recess, it left several major legislative efforts that would benefit homebuyers and owners either twisting in the wind or dead, including bills with unusually strong bipartisan support. Tops on the list is a bill that passed the House with the most lopsided majority of any major housing or real estate measure in the past 20 years. Originally called the American Homeownership and Economic Opportunity Act of 2000, H.R. 1776, the bill passed the House 417-8 on April 6. Then it went to the Senate, where it has been stuck ever since and has come under partisan attack.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 22, 2000
WEST ISLIP, N.Y. - In much of New York, he might best be known as what's-his-name. Rick A. Lazio, the Republican congressman from Long Island running in perhaps the most-watched Senate race in history, has some introductions to make. First off, he is describing who he is not. The man who will challenge the first-ever first lady Senate candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton, wasted no time over the weekend drawing sharp contrasts - branding her an interloper and himself a native son, calling her "far left" and himself moderate.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Ellen Gamerman and Thomas W. Waldron and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
Little Italy gave a hero's welcome last night to Rep. Rick A. Lazio of New York as he made a quick stop in Baltimore to raise money for his U.S. Senate race against Hillary Rodham Clinton. Enrico Lazio, the grandson of Sicilian immigrants, smiled broadly as he walked through the neighborhood, shaking hands, speaking a little Italian and signing at least one autograph. "Good luck," Matilda Chiapparelli, a longtime resident, told Lazio. "I can't stand her." At a dinner at Aldo's Restaurant, Lazio raised about $65,000 for his battle against Clinton, largely from supporters of Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who organized the event.
NEWS
By Paul West and Ellen Gamerman and Paul West and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 14, 2000
BUFFALO, N.Y. - With new polls showing the first lady edging into the lead, Hillary Rodham Clinton and her Republican rival in New York's Senate contest tangled in their first televised debate last night over the Monica Lewinsky scandal and the influence of millions of dollars worth of soft-money ads in their race. During an often testy and sometimes personal debate, Rep. Rick A. Lazio, a Republican congressman from Long Island, challenged Clinton to sign an agreement to forgo raising and spending unregulated soft money for the rest of the campaign.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 8, 2000
NEW YORK - Writing a new chapter in the Clinton family saga, Hillary Rodham Clinton easily defeated Republican opponent Rick A. Lazio for a U.S. Senate seat yesterday to become the first-ever first lady elected to public office. "I just want to say, thank you, New York," Clinton told cheering supporters at the Grand Hyatt here. "I will work my heart out for the next six years for all of you." The Illinois-native frustrated foes who called her a carpetbagger and overcame heated antagonism toward the Clinton presidency to best the Long Island congressman.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 2000
Voter attitudes toward Rick A. Lazio have turned markedly more negative since June, with suburban women now moving solidly toward Hillary Rodham Clinton and many New Yorkers saying Lazio came across as harsh and inexperienced in his debate with Clinton last week, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News poll. The survey, which began Sept. 14 and was completed Tuesday night, suggested deterioration in Lazio's standing at the time that most politicians believe that voters are beginning serious consideration of the choice before them in the race for Senate.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2000
NEW YORK - Rep. Rick A. Lazio of Long Island came roaring into the race for senator from New York yesterday, attacking Hillary Rodham Clinton as a "far-left, extremist" candidate who has "no real rationale for serving here other than as a steppingstone to some other position." "I think her ambition is the issue," Lazio declared in an interview, as he formally announced his candidacy in a race that has been upended by the decision of Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani to step aside for health reasons.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 8, 2000
NEW YORK - Writing a new chapter in the Clinton family saga, Hillary Rodham Clinton easily defeated Republican opponent Rick A. Lazio for a U.S. Senate seat yesterday to become the first-ever first lady elected to public office. "I just want to say, thank you, New York," Clinton told cheering supporters at the Grand Hyatt here. "I will work my heart out for the next six years for all of you." The Illinois-native frustrated foes who called her a carpetbagger and overcame heated antagonism toward the Clinton presidency to best the Long Island congressman.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 2000
Voter attitudes toward Rick A. Lazio have turned markedly more negative since June, with suburban women now moving solidly toward Hillary Rodham Clinton and many New Yorkers saying Lazio came across as harsh and inexperienced in his debate with Clinton last week, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News poll. The survey, which began Sept. 14 and was completed Tuesday night, suggested deterioration in Lazio's standing at the time that most politicians believe that voters are beginning serious consideration of the choice before them in the race for Senate.
NEWS
By Paul West and Ellen Gamerman and Paul West and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 14, 2000
BUFFALO, N.Y. - With new polls showing the first lady edging into the lead, Hillary Rodham Clinton and her Republican rival in New York's Senate contest tangled in their first televised debate last night over the Monica Lewinsky scandal and the influence of millions of dollars worth of soft-money ads in their race. During an often testy and sometimes personal debate, Rep. Rick A. Lazio, a Republican congressman from Long Island, challenged Clinton to sign an agreement to forgo raising and spending unregulated soft money for the rest of the campaign.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | August 16, 2000
Notes from the Underwhelmed: There has been much gnashing of teeth and rending of garments here in the print biz about the dearth of coverage of the major parties conventions on network television. With the burst of cable news stations, the wall-to-wall programming of C-SPAN, and the extensive coverage provided by PBS, the real question becomes who's providing the best quality, not simply how many hours are on the air. A chance to find out came Monday night, when President Clinton delivered his swan song and Hillary Rodham Clinton addressed party delegates in Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 2, 2000
George unveiled his secret weapon, a big tent. Looks like a winner. Someone better tell Al. Can the party of Laura Bush and Colin Powell really be the party of Tom DeLay and Strom Thurmond? Of course, they have it upside down. You'd want seasoned old Cheney for president, young George for veep. The showdown is Harvard v. Yale. For NY senator, it's Wellesley v. Vassar. (Lazio is Vassar. You could look it up.)
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Ellen Gamerman and Thomas W. Waldron and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
Little Italy gave a hero's welcome last night to Rep. Rick A. Lazio of New York as he made a quick stop in Baltimore to raise money for his U.S. Senate race against Hillary Rodham Clinton. Enrico Lazio, the grandson of Sicilian immigrants, smiled broadly as he walked through the neighborhood, shaking hands, speaking a little Italian and signing at least one autograph. "Good luck," Matilda Chiapparelli, a longtime resident, told Lazio. "I can't stand her." At a dinner at Aldo's Restaurant, Lazio raised about $65,000 for his battle against Clinton, largely from supporters of Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who organized the event.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 2, 2000
George unveiled his secret weapon, a big tent. Looks like a winner. Someone better tell Al. Can the party of Laura Bush and Colin Powell really be the party of Tom DeLay and Strom Thurmond? Of course, they have it upside down. You'd want seasoned old Cheney for president, young George for veep. The showdown is Harvard v. Yale. For NY senator, it's Wellesley v. Vassar. (Lazio is Vassar. You could look it up.)
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | June 16, 2000
NEW YORK -- Does it make any difference whether Republican Rudy Giuliani or Rick Lazio is running against Democrat Hillary Clinton for the U.S. Senate seat? Conventional wisdom holds that the race will be even more of a referendum on the first lady against the little known Mr. Lazio than it was against the controversial mayor of New York. Conversations with strategists in both parties here suggest there is considerably more than anti-Hillary sentiment involved in how the election will play out between Ms. Clinton and Mr. Lazio.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | June 19, 2000
NEW YORK -- So far it's been pretty much a honeymoon for Rep. Rick Lazio in his debut as the Republican nominee for the U.S. Senate seat against Democrat Hillary Clinton. His boyish, open good looks and easy smile are well on the way to making him a new media star, and many New York Republicans express relief that the controversial Mayor Rudy Giuliani is off the ticket. The latest poll by Quinnipiac University about a week ago showed Mr. Lazio catapulting into a flat 44-44 percent tie with the first lady, but the same survey indicated much of his support was anti-Hillary.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | June 16, 2000
NEW YORK -- Does it make any difference whether Republican Rudy Giuliani or Rick Lazio is running against Democrat Hillary Clinton for the U.S. Senate seat? Conventional wisdom holds that the race will be even more of a referendum on the first lady against the little known Mr. Lazio than it was against the controversial mayor of New York. Conversations with strategists in both parties here suggest there is considerably more than anti-Hillary sentiment involved in how the election will play out between Ms. Clinton and Mr. Lazio.
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