Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLaziness
IN THE NEWS

Laziness

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
June 30, 1991
MOVING 'WIND'Editor: Alice Steinbach always writes very sensitive, beautiful stories. I enjoyed reading her article "The Girl Who Loved the Wind" (May 12). What a lovely story! The wind really moved!Betty D. EdlavitchBaltimoreMORE SILLY SIGNSI think Charlotte Latvala, whose essay I enjoyed (May 19 -- "Signs of Idiocy"), is on a great campaign. The theme should be continued, expanded and be the basis for a national organization.Let's add: Signs on the ramp entrances to the JFX-I83. "Check your fuel."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 3, 2014
I read William Smith's letter again and again ( "Who needs lazy retirees?" Aug. 19). It was an incredibly good piece of satire. For those that didn't get it, the retirees who are leaving Maryland are not the lazy welfare addicts - those people stay here. Instead, the ones who are leaving are those of us who worked long and hard our entire lives, lived within our means and paid off our mortgages instead of continually refinancing to buy yet a nicer car or a bigger TV. We are the ones who saved enough money to retire without counting on Social Security.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 18, 2004
Words You Thought You Knew ... 1001 Commonly Misused and Misunderstood Words and Phrases, by Jenna Glatzer. Adams Media. 310 pages. $8.95. Glatzer has specialized in counseling her fellow free-lance writers, two books and in periodicals. Here, she puts together a useful, brightly presented set of admonitions to use language correctly with emphasis on errors that have become cliches. It's "champing at the bit," not "chomping." And she straightens out the "lay / lie" muddlement nicely and precisely.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
I was totally shocked by William Smith's letter concerning "lazy retirees" ( "Who needs those lazy retirees?" Aug. 19). The letter lacked cohesion, and it was difficult to discern if he was ranting about retirees leaving Maryland, welfare addicts or undocumented immigrants. As one of the many Marylanders planning to leave the state, I earned that right, and as an American citizen I am free to move to any state or country I please - especially to those that don't tax the rain.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 21, 2006
Hollywood scripts need to stop taking the easy way out. The Sentinel opens today, with Kiefer Sutherland playing a Secret Service agent struggling like heck to keep the president of the United States from being assassinated. It's no accident that this is essentially the same role he's been playing for five years on Fox television's 24. Casting him in such a similar role keeps the filmmakers responsible for The Sentinel from having to make his character believable; audiences have been buying him in that role for years.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | November 17, 1992
IT had to happen. There were bound to be unflattering references to Chelsea Clinton in the public press. The first offending example appeared in the mischievous guise of a friendly op-ed by a fellow teen-ager."
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | May 21, 1991
Each afternoon, many people find themselves slipping into a solitary struggle against nature. Sometime around 3 o'clock, they crash. Minds start to wander, eyelids droop, temperatures drop, breathing slows -- there is an almost overwhelming urge to . . . nod . . . off.Most working adults fight the urge by sitting, slouching, furtively lying down, or sneaking out for a walk or cup of coffee.It is odd that such a pervasive biological need is regarded as a secret shame. Industrialized societies in general equate naps with laziness, irresponsibility, immaturity and senility.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 2, 1996
Here's a nice hydrochloric aperitif for before dinner: Rene Clement's 1960 chiller "Purple Noon," rescued from oblivion by director/film scholar Martin Scorsese and re-released to American audiences by a new division of Miramax.The movie, opening today at the Charles, is derived from the 1955 American novel "The Talented Mr. Ripley," by suspensemistress Patricia Highsmith, a Jessica Fletcher with a nasty sense of humor. Highsmith's creation, played here with icy aplomb by Alain Delon, was one Tom Ripley, a handsome, charming, clever psychopath who maneuvers his way into the lives of the indolent rich, takes their money and sometimes their lives, and goes his merry way. That's exactly what the film chronicles.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | July 15, 1993
Reading Time: Two Minutes.You've read about it a few times, perhaps heard about it on national television and maybe there was even a plane dragging a sign to the effect that the Orioles had passed up the chance to play host to the All-Star Game a couple of times.Lately, of course, they would have been waiting for the dawning of the new ballpark. But the excuse that previous "turns" in the '60s and '70s were passed up because the team wanted to save the city the embarrassment of not selling out just doesn't ring true here.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2002
It's not hard to find Richard Simmons in a crowd. He bounded into the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday, screaming, "I'm over heeeere!" as a crowd of devotees shrieked and surrounded the fitness/weight-loss guru, hoping for a kiss or a few cherished words of approval. Simmons, looking bronzed and remarkably fit at 54, worked his way up to the stage, lavishing praise on his fans and shimmying in an outfit nearly as loud as his greeting, with tiny striped shorts and a sea-blue, sequin-covered tank top. Disco music blasted as he began a low-impact aerobics class that was the featured event of the Healthy Living Choices Expo held there during the weekend.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
As a retiree, I read William Smith's recent letter to the editor with equal parts amazement and sadness ( "Who needs those lazy retirees?" Aug. 19). Amazement at the level of vitriol displayed, and sadness because it appears that Mr. Smith's education did not include a rigorous course in English usage, during which he would have become familiar with the definitions of the words "handout" and "welfare. " Let me attempt to fill this lamentable gap. According to Oxforddictionaries.com, a handout is "something given free to a needy person," and welfare is "financial support given to people in need.
NEWS
August 19, 2014
In response to the letter writer who was leaving Maryland as soon as he retires with all those other retirees who are "leaving Maryland in droves," I can only say good riddance and don't let the door hit you on the way out ( "Retirees are leaving Maryland in droves and I'm next," Aug. 15). We all know that retired people are takers, not makers. They're all suckling at the government teat and whining about "taxes" while waiting for their next handout. Who needs 'em? I say let's encourage more of these lazy welfare addicts to take their mooching to some other state and encourage more young, industrious Central Americans to make Maryland their home.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
I feel I must respond on behalf of all of us "lazy teachers" who feel work is beneath them ( "Waivers are for lazy teachers," March 29). Letter writer J. Robert Clark obviously does not realize that we work the same amount of days every school year regardless of how many snow days we have. I know of no teacher who feels that work is beneath them. In fact, many of my colleagues get to school early and stay late, well beyond their contractual obligations. Our objections to Common Core have nothing to do with laziness.
NEWS
March 29, 2014
I find it a little infuriating that schools are asking for waivers to circumvent the 180-day law ( "Snowed in," March 27). Our schools are woefully behind other countries in testing, language skills, mathematics and sciences. You would think our teachers and administrators (which are the highest paid in the world) would welcome the opportunity to get as much teaching time as possible. I am a school bus driver for Baltimore County Public Schools and what I see every day is our education system bending over backward to promulgate the facade of quality academia.
NEWS
January 8, 2014
Senate Republicans blinked this week on the issue of unemployment benefits, but you can bet that their House counterparts won't be so easily swayed by compassion. At least that's what Democrats are counting on. After legislation to resume long-term unemployment insurance benefits cleared a procedural hurdle on a 60-37 vote on Tuesday, House Speaker John Boehner announced that he'll only consider the measure if there are off-setting cuts in spending and the legislation "includes something to help put people back to work.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2013
Lazy eye is often mistaken for eyes that cross or wander, but some patients with the disorder don't show these symptoms. Dr. Lisa Abrams, a pediatric ophthalmologist at Katzen Eye Group, talks about how lazy eye is diagnosed, who gets it and how it is treated. What is lazy eye? "Lazy eye," amblyopia, is often misinterpreted as an eye that crosses or wanders. These conditions can be associated with "lazy eye," but the real meaning is an eye that does not see as well as it should.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 11, 2002
TODAY WE PRESENT: Laundry Tips for Guys. Many guys have trouble with laundry, because of the technical complexity involved. Even a very "high-tech" guy, a guy who can build a working nuclear submarine using only staples, is reluctant to attempt to do laundry, because there are so many variables: You have your lights and your darks, of course, but you also have your stripes, some of which could be delicates, or even hand-washables, not to mention your...
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | April 4, 1992
This is the third in a series of conversations with voting Americans. Throughout the presidential campaign, The Sun is talking with voters in different regions of the country, sounding .. out the electorate as the two major parties select nominees.ROCHESTER, N.Y. -- Go ask the construction worker about the presidential elections. Then ask the corporate accountant, the retired couple, the entrepreneur, and the real estate executive. They've never met, but they sound as if they just came from the same talk show, their comments overlapping in a loop of apathy and anxiety.
NEWS
By Peggy Rowe | September 2, 2013
I was in the waiting room of my doctor's office the other day when I overheard a conversation between three women behind the desk. "I've been too busy to take my break," complained a receptionist sitting at a computer. "Thank God it's Friday!" said another young woman carrying a stack of folders. A third, who had been scheduling appointments, put down the receiver and said, "I dread week-ends - cleaning, laundry, shopping, soccer games ... " And that's when I heard something so funny, I had to raise my magazine so as not to be seen laughing.
NEWS
Aegis report | June 24, 2013
Valleybrook Country Club in Kingsville is teaming up with Cool Kids Campaign charity for the fourth Lazy River Duck Derby fundraiser from 5 to 9 p.m. July 12. The Lazy River Duck Derby, open to the public and providing an all-access pass to Valleybrook for the evening, takes place in the "Lazy River," a pool that features a narrow channel with a flowing component. A $10 rubber duck rental fee will be collected from each person upon admission, and the duck will be entered in three races throughout the evening.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.