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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 1996
At the end of this month on a trip via United Airlines, we have a four-hour layover -- actually, 3 hours 40 minutes -- in Chicago. Is it possible either to go to downtown Chicago to view its architecture or to see a nearby Frank Lloyd Wright structure? We are scheduled to land at 10: 20 a.m. on a weekday, with our next flight departing at 2.If you are interested in Wright, it makes sense to head for Oak Park, which is nine miles west of downtown, between O'Hare and the center of Chicago. The architect lived there from 1889 to 1909 and completed a quarter of his life's work there, according to Angela Fitzsimmons, a spokeswoman for the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio in Oak Park.
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By Mike Giuliano | October 23, 2012
William Inge's "Bus Stop" was the very first play staged at the Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre in 1962, so it's fitting that its new production of "Bus Stop" recently had its opening night 50 years to the day of that theater-opening production's opening night. This compact in-the-round theater in Baltimore's Mount Vernon neighborhood might not seem like the most promising space in which to produce plays, but the Spotlighters has a half-century record of creatively making the most of its basement-level theater.
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NEWS
October 7, 1990
The MTA has scheduled the following changes in bus routes for this week. For more information, call 539-5000; TTY for the hearing-impaired, 539-3497.Route changesThe Columbus Day Parade today necessitates the following route changes between 2 p.m. and 5 p.m.Nos. 7 and 10 -- When eastbound, via the regular route on Pratt Street to Calvert Street, then north on Calvert, east on Baltimore Street, north on Gay Street, east on Fayette Street, south on Central Avenue, east on Pratt Street, then via the regular route.
TRAVEL
By McClatchy-Tribune | December 28, 2008
I have a 26-hour layover in Shanghai, China. Can I store my luggage at the airport and do some sightseeing? Are there short-stay hotels? Because Shanghai is an important business center and a common stopover on Asia routes, Pudong International Airport is well-prepared for travelers like you. Here is a rundown on offerings, with recommendations from tourism and airport officials: If you decide to stow your luggage and do some exploring, you'll find...
NEWS
October 6, 1991
Here's what to look for if you're traveling in the Baltimore metropolitan area this week. This list of highway projects includes only newly announced work, not continuing construction, which is extensive on several highways, including Interstate 95, U.S. 50/301 and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway.New highway projectsWarren Road at Route 45 will be closed for approximately 30 days. Motorists should follow detour signs.Light-rail constructionB6 No new light-rail projects are expected this week.
NEWS
November 18, 1990
The MTA has scheduled the following changes in bus routes for this week. For more information, call 539-5000; TTY for the hearing-impaired, 539-3497.Temporary reroutingsNo. 13 (Lower Canton Service) -- Until further notice, ClintoStreet will be one way northbound between Keith Avenue and Boston Street. Buses to lower Canton on the No. 13 line travel via regular route to Clinton and Boston, then east on Boston, east on Interstate Avenue, south on the access ramp to I-95 to Exit 56 (Keith Avenue)
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1996
How much is the Whitbread Round the World Race worth to Baltimore-Annapolis area? That is a question a dozen or so non-sailing outdoorsmen have asked since the two cities landed the April 1998 layover of the sailing race.The attitude of non-sailors always has been, "Who cares? Just keep them out of my fishing lines and away from the hot spots."The value of the Whitbread layover has yet to be determined by city and state officials, but they speculate that the sailing race has the potential to pay off big for the city and the state.
SPORTS
By Les Bowen and Les Bowen,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 1, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- The Flyers have experienced some of the hardships struggling teams often endure in the NHL, and they haven't exactly liked it.Several players privately blamed Saturday's 5-1 loss in Calgary on a penny-pinching travel itinerary they say left them exhausted. Travel plans for last week's trip to Vancouver and Calgary and this week's trip to San Jose and Los Angeles have been the subject of spirited discussion between players and management."It took its toll against Calgary, there's no question about that," team captain Rick Tocchet said Monday.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1996
Chessie Racing, a syndicate headed by three prominent sailors from the Baltimore-Annapolis area, yesterday announced a multimillion-dollar campaign to "compete in and win" the 1997-1998 Whitbread Round the World Race.Mark K. Fischer, president of Chessie Racing, said the syndicate will draw heavily on "the tremendous talent pool" of sailors and designers in this area to design, build and crew a Whitbread 60 boat.It will be designed by Bruce Farr and Associates of Annapolis.Chessie Racing had been negotiating with a major European sponsor until a few weeks ago, Fischer said, "but in the end, we never could see eye to eye. . . . And we came to the conclusion that we can put together a viable group that can compete to win."
SPORTS
By Susan Fornoff and Susan Fornoff,Contributing Writer | February 16, 1993
OAKLAND, Calif. -- The Washington Bullets' longest road trip of the season started to feel eternal Sunday night after a 114-94 loss to the Golden State Warriors. But the team's youngest starter says the schedule isn't excuse enough for the 15-34 Bullets."I think the schedule wears down every team in the league, so we're no different," said rookie Tom Gugliotta. "We started off real well, and now we're starting to slip a bit. We're not even able to stay in the game. We're getting blown out, and that is something I don't think should happen."
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2003
Organizers of the Volvo Ocean Race have decided that when it comes to civic and corporate hospitality, there are no better ports on the East Coast than Baltimore and Annapolis. The fleet competing in the global campaign will make its only U.S. layover when it finishes one leg near Fort McHenry about April 6, 2006, and restarts the race in Annapolis under the Bay Bridge 23 days later. Many of the details of the race, including stops and boat specifications, were announced today in Auckland, New Zealand, site of the America's Cup. "We're happy to be coming back to Baltimore and Annapolis because they've done a fantastic job in the past," said Glenn Bourke, chief executive of the Volvo Ocean Race, in a telephone interview.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2000
ABOARD THE MADDENCRUISER - The first thing that strikes you about this rolling home away from home is how it just doesn't seem big enough for its principal inhabitant. OK, so there's a satellite dish, three TV sets, a bedroom, two bathrooms, a fax machine, a kitchen - with a refrigerator, oven and microwave - dinette table, three captain's chairs and a sofa laid out across a converted 45-foot bus, more than enough to keep any football fan happy. But as a passenger boards John Madden's vehicle of choice as it made the last leg of the trip down Interstate 95 from New York to Baltimore on Friday evening for today's Ravens-Cowboys game, his first television visit here in 19 years, there's a sense that there ought to be more for a man who, with all the fame, fortune and endorsements one can handle, seems so much larger than life.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 1996
At the end of this month on a trip via United Airlines, we have a four-hour layover -- actually, 3 hours 40 minutes -- in Chicago. Is it possible either to go to downtown Chicago to view its architecture or to see a nearby Frank Lloyd Wright structure? We are scheduled to land at 10: 20 a.m. on a weekday, with our next flight departing at 2.If you are interested in Wright, it makes sense to head for Oak Park, which is nine miles west of downtown, between O'Hare and the center of Chicago. The architect lived there from 1889 to 1909 and completed a quarter of his life's work there, according to Angela Fitzsimmons, a spokeswoman for the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio in Oak Park.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1996
How much is the Whitbread Round the World Race worth to Baltimore-Annapolis area? That is a question a dozen or so non-sailing outdoorsmen have asked since the two cities landed the April 1998 layover of the sailing race.The attitude of non-sailors always has been, "Who cares? Just keep them out of my fishing lines and away from the hot spots."The value of the Whitbread layover has yet to be determined by city and state officials, but they speculate that the sailing race has the potential to pay off big for the city and the state.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1996
Chessie Racing, a syndicate headed by three prominent sailors from the Baltimore-Annapolis area, yesterday announced a multimillion-dollar campaign to "compete in and win" the 1997-1998 Whitbread Round the World Race.Mark K. Fischer, president of Chessie Racing, said the syndicate will draw heavily on "the tremendous talent pool" of sailors and designers in this area to design, build and crew a Whitbread 60 boat.It will be designed by Bruce Farr and Associates of Annapolis.Chessie Racing had been negotiating with a major European sponsor until a few weeks ago, Fischer said, "but in the end, we never could see eye to eye. . . . And we came to the conclusion that we can put together a viable group that can compete to win."
FEATURES
By David Kronke and David Kronke,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 1996
Kate Winslet has been making a name for herself in movies in which the directors have been spreading their visionary wings.First came last year's "Heavenly Creatures," the astonishing true story about two young, outcast women in New Zealand whose bond became so ferociously impermeable that they were willing to resort to murder to keep it intact. That film was by Peter Jackson, who previously had created hilarious splatterfests such "Dead Alive" and "Meet the Feebles."Now Ms. Winslet is causing an even larger stir in "Sense and Sensibility," for which the film's star, Emma Thompson, wrote the adaptation of the Jane Austen novel, and in which Taiwanese director Ang Lee ("Eat Drink Man Woman," "The Wedding Banquet")
FEATURES
By David Kronke and David Kronke,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 1996
Kate Winslet has been making a name for herself in movies in which the directors have been spreading their visionary wings.First came last year's "Heavenly Creatures," the astonishing true story about two young, outcast women in New Zealand whose bond became so ferociously impermeable that they were willing to resort to murder to keep it intact. That film was by Peter Jackson, who previously had created hilarious splatterfests such "Dead Alive" and "Meet the Feebles."Now Ms. Winslet is causing an even larger stir in "Sense and Sensibility," for which the film's star, Emma Thompson, wrote the adaptation of the Jane Austen novel, and in which Taiwanese director Ang Lee ("Eat Drink Man Woman," "The Wedding Banquet")
SPORTS
By Susan Fornoff and Susan Fornoff,Contributing Writer | February 16, 1993
OAKLAND, Calif. -- The Washington Bullets' longest road trip of the season started to feel eternal Sunday night after a 114-94 loss to the Golden State Warriors. But the team's youngest starter says the schedule isn't excuse enough for the 15-34 Bullets."I think the schedule wears down every team in the league, so we're no different," said rookie Tom Gugliotta. "We started off real well, and now we're starting to slip a bit. We're not even able to stay in the game. We're getting blown out, and that is something I don't think should happen."
SPORTS
By Les Bowen and Les Bowen,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 1, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- The Flyers have experienced some of the hardships struggling teams often endure in the NHL, and they haven't exactly liked it.Several players privately blamed Saturday's 5-1 loss in Calgary on a penny-pinching travel itinerary they say left them exhausted. Travel plans for last week's trip to Vancouver and Calgary and this week's trip to San Jose and Los Angeles have been the subject of spirited discussion between players and management."It took its toll against Calgary, there's no question about that," team captain Rick Tocchet said Monday.
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