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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1998
A memory of a long-gone restaurant and a delicious cake served there prompted this week's request and response.Ginny Spittell of Ellicott City requested a recipe for Box Tree Inn cake. "Some years ago on Franklin Street near Charles, the little Box Tree Inn Restaurant was in the same location as the Tio Pepe Restaurant is now," she wrote. "They made an unbelievably popular yellow layer cake with an unusual chocolate icing, which was a little bittersweet with a granular side. Absolutely delicious.
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By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Mary Beth York from Niles, Mich., was copying some old recipes a friend had collected over the years and stuck in the back of a cookbook from 1942 when she came across one called "Crisco Breath o' Spring" cake. Unfortunately, there was some damage to the recipe and she was unable to read parts of it. Apparently, the recipe was on the label of a can of Crisco, but when York contacted the Crisco company, she was told that they do not save all their old recipes and no longer had the one she was looking for. York was hoping someone still had the recipe and would be willing to share it with her. Diane Jensen from Alamogordo, N.M., sent in the recipe for the cake York was looking for that Jensen said was copied from a photograph of the original Crisco advertisement from 1945.
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By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Dorothy Miller from Towson was looking for a recipe for what she called "Oriental fruitcake. " She said the layer cake was made with pineapple, coconut, walnuts and raisins. Faith Hermann from Relay sent in a recipe for a Japanese fruitcake that her mother used to make that she thought sounded very similar to the cake Miller had described. According to Bill Neal, author of "Biscuits, Spoonbread, and Sweet Potato Pie," Japanese fruitcake is "an exotically named, typically Southern dessert cake, especially popular in the twentieth century.
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By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Dorothy Miller from Towson was looking for a recipe for what she called "Oriental fruitcake. " She said the layer cake was made with pineapple, coconut, walnuts and raisins. Faith Hermann from Relay sent in a recipe for a Japanese fruitcake that her mother used to make that she thought sounded very similar to the cake Miller had described. According to Bill Neal, author of "Biscuits, Spoonbread, and Sweet Potato Pie," Japanese fruitcake is "an exotically named, typically Southern dessert cake, especially popular in the twentieth century.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2008
Pam Kelleman of Phoenix was looking for a recipe for a layer cake that was served at the now-closed Pimlico Hotel restaurant in Baltimore. She was hoping a reader would have the "original" recipe for the cake. Unfortunately, I did not receive any responses, but I happened to notice that Atwater's bakery at Belvedere Square makes a version of this hometown favorite. Ned Atwater was kind enough to modify his Pimlico cake recipe for the home baker. I tested his cake, and it was just as Kelleman described the original: a yellow chiffon layer cake filled with Bavarian custard and iced with a rich chocolate frosting.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 27, 2005
The gangster as GQ-style middle man is the good joke behind Layer Cake. This cheeky, brass-knuckles British crime film stars Daniel Craig as an all-business London drug dealer who views coke strictly as a commodity but can't help getting sucked into the sordid vortex of the underworld. A smart leading man with a wild comic streak, Craig capitalizes on the role of a spiffy guy who gets semi-unglued when circumstances demand muscle. Simultaneously, he's assigned to locate the missing daughter of his boss man's old friend and to broker a hot stash of Ecstasy.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | September 12, 2007
Joy Johnson of Hamilton, N.J., was looking for a recipe for a chocolate-pistachio cake that she thought was originally published in McCall's magazine in the 1980s. Several readers had the original recipe from the January 1984 issue and from the McCall's cooking school series of the same time. Betty Blecki of Timonium kindly sent in a color photo copy of the cake recipe complete with step-by-step picture directions. Once you make this cake, it's easy to understand why so many readers held onto the recipe.
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By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,McClatchy-Tribune | July 28, 2007
There's leafy-green mint in pesto and potato salads. Mint in fruit salsas, dressings and sauces. Mint in chocolate confections and atop sliced fruit. Yes, the perky taste is clean and cool -- a perfect flavor profile to add to warm-weather treats. This chocolate cake with mint whipped-cream frosting is simple to make and delicious. Prepare a cake-mix chocolate layer cake (doctored up by adding sour cream to make it rich) and top with a minty whipped cream. Garnish with fresh berries tossed with slivers of fresh mint and a little orange liqueur or raspberry liqueur.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 6, 1993
Tamber's 3327 St. Paul St. Hours: Monday through Thursday 11 a.m. to 10 Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call: (410) 243-0383If you're in the mood for home cooking, but not in the mood to cook at home, stop by Tamber's after work and pick up the kind of meal that Harriet used to make for Ozzie, or Mrs. Cleaver made for the Beav.Although the peas and carrots in the chicken pot pie ($5.95) aren't fresh, June Cleaver probably didn't use fresh, either. And the soothing yellow gravy, chunks of chicken and potato and tasty crust more than compensate.
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By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | April 12, 1995
1-2-3-4 CakeMakes 16 servings3 cups all-purpose flour1 tablespoon baking powder1/8 teaspoon salt1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened2 cups sugar4 large eggs1 cup whole milk1 teaspoon pure vanilla extractHeat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour three 9-inch round cake pans. Sift together the flour, baking powder and salt; set aside.Put the butter into a large mixing bowl. Beat with an electric mixer on high speed until the butter lightens in color, 2 minutes. Gradually add the sugar.
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By Megan Isennock | April 24, 2012
I am not a cake person.  If you put a giant, lovely cake next to a bowl of crispy fries doused in malt vinegar, salt, and pepper, I would grab the fries and leave the cake feeling unwanted and alone while I devoured my hypothetical starches.   Not loving sweets is usually a great thing. I rarely order dessert (unless "salted" is in the description), and the candy aisle holds no power over me. Something like chocolate covered pretzels will occasionally pique my fancy, but then, there's salt involved there, too. The problem with cake is that it's all sweet.
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By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2010
Maria Scheufele from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for making rainbow or ribbon cake. She described the cake as a "layer cake made with several colored layers that resembles a rainbow and is frosted with chocolate." She said that these cakes can be found in local bakeries and delicatessens. Reva Arnoff from Pikesville sent in her recipe for making rainbow cookie/cake squares, which I believe is just what Scheufele is looking for. She says that the finished cake can be cut into "loaf shapes" and sliced as a cake or cut into 2-inch-by-1-inch cookies.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | July 5, 2010
Nag!, Nag! Nag! Apparently Health Magazine, which called Smith Island Cake one of the nation's 50 fattest foods, wants us to have no fun. Figuring that the summer is a time for travel and indulgent eating, the magazine picked a dish from each of the 50 states that could be bad for you. The choices were high in calories, loaded with fat, or served in gigantic portions. Smith Island Cake, recently named by the legislature as the official Maryland dessert, was the Free State's contribution to the list.
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By Michael Dresser | November 11, 2009
From: Mendoza, Argentina Price: $15 Serve with: Beef stew, lasagna The full-bodied, smooth wine from Argentina is simply packed with robust flavors of blackberry, cassis, chocolate and coffee. It's much like a fine vintage port without the sweetness. The fruit is so intense and rounded, the 14.9 percent alcohol is barely perceptible. A screw cap ensures no cork problems. Recipe search   Search over 3,000 recipes in our archive Keywords:    Or choose a date:    Choose ... All to April '02 Feb. 3, 2010 Jan. 27, 2010 Jan. 20, 2010 Jan. 13, 2010 Jan. 6, 2010 Dec. 30, 2009 Dec. 23, 2009 Dec. 16, 2009 Dec. 9, 2009 Dec. 2, 2009 Nov. 25, 2009 Nov. 18, 2009 Nov. 11, 2009 Nov. 4, 2009 Oct. 28, 2009 Oct. 21, 2009 Oct. 14, 2009 Oct. 7, 2009 Sept.
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By JACQUES KELLY | August 1, 2009
My grandmother enforced a no-oven policy during the hottest part of the summer. Her adamant don't-heat-up-the-kitchen stance caused some interesting detours when a family birthday fell during the cake-baking blackout period. The simple answer was to phone Fiske's, the wonderful Park Avenue-Bolton Hill confectioner, and order a cake and ice cream, which was delivered in a snappy-looking dark blue truck with gold lettering. The ice cream came boxed and wrapped in dry ice that, when placed in a bucket of water, made great spooky clouds.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2008
Pam Kelleman of Phoenix was looking for a recipe for a layer cake that was served at the now-closed Pimlico Hotel restaurant in Baltimore. She was hoping a reader would have the "original" recipe for the cake. Unfortunately, I did not receive any responses, but I happened to notice that Atwater's bakery at Belvedere Square makes a version of this hometown favorite. Ned Atwater was kind enough to modify his Pimlico cake recipe for the home baker. I tested his cake, and it was just as Kelleman described the original: a yellow chiffon layer cake filled with Bavarian custard and iced with a rich chocolate frosting.
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