Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLayaway
IN THE NEWS

Layaway

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | andrea.walker@baltsun.com | November 25, 2009
With consumers leery of piling up credit card debt, more and more retailers are reviving a service that had been given up for dead: layaway. Kmart began offering Internet layaway this year, and sister company Sears expanded its service to the Internet this year. Online site eLayaway.com has seen its business grow. Toys "R" Us announced last month it would bring back layaway on more expensive items such as bikes and cribs, though not yet in Maryland. Promotions for layaway - which allows consumers to pay for merchandise in installments - have picked up as stores prepare for a challenging holiday season.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 26, 2012
Here's a deal few would jump on: A chance to pay $2,000 for a $600 laptop computer, $1,200 for a $400 TV set, and nearly $2,700 for a used washing machine and dryer that only cost $935 when new. It's probably safe to say most people would run the other way as fast as possible if asked to plunk down their hard-earned cash on those terms. Yet there's a booming market for such transactions in Maryland, where so-called "rent-to-own" stores are a $67 million-a-year industry, according to a new Maryland Consumer Rights Coalition report funded by the Abell Foundation.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2011
In the annals of holiday nostalgia, it's hardly up there in "Christmas Carol" territory. Still, the news that layaways are back has me feeling less Scrooge-like than I usually do when the holiday spend-a-thon season approaches. Major retailers like Walmart, you might have seen, are bringing back or expanding their layaway programs — those old, pay-by-installment plans that went by the wayside when credit cards became all too common. I'm not really a layaway type myself, but I'm glad it's made a comeback anyway.
NEWS
December 29, 2011
I recently read about the people who paid for others' Christmas gifts on layaway ("Donating thousands, 'layaway angels' land in Maryland," Dec. 22). It made my heart glad knowing we still have people who show their love and compassion for others instead of thinking only of themselves. Wouldn't it be wonderful if we all could show others love and compassion not just at Christmas, but throughout the entire year? Love conquers all. Let's show others the true meaning of love each and every day. Timothy Modlin
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | September 15, 2006
First it was tearooms in department stores. Then lunch counters at drugstores. Now layaway seems to be seeing its last days as a familiar part of the shopping experience. Wal-Mart Stores Inc. has become the latest and biggest retailer to do away with layaway, another sign that the practice that became popular during the credit crunch after World War II is slowly becoming obsolete. The world's largest retailer said yesterday that the service, which it is ending in November, wasn't widely used and that it was becoming too costly to run. Wal-Mart will stop accepting layaway items Nov. 19, and customers will have to pick them up by mid- December.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,dan.thanh.dang@baltsun.com | November 1, 2008
In the old days, when you saw something you really liked but couldn't afford, you didn't just charge it and take that sucker home. You put it on layaway. Over a period of some weeks or months, you could make payments in installments - which was a little easier than forking out all the dough all at once. This meant you couldn't take home what you wanted right away, but it was yours once you paid in full. It was a great concept that went the way of the dinosaur once credit started getting handed out like so much candy corn on Halloween.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | November 25, 2009
With consumers leery of piling up credit card debt, more and more retailers are reviving a service that had been given up for dead: layaway. Kmart began offering Internet layaway this year, and sister company Sears expanded its service to the Internet this year. Online site eLayaway.com has seen its business grow. Toys "R" Us announced last month it would bring back layaway on more expensive items such as bikes and cribs, though not yet in Maryland. Promotions for layaway - which allows consumers to pay for merchandise in installments - have picked up as stores prepare for a challenging holiday season.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | November 23, 2008
We haven't even started imbibing yet, and already most of us are preparing for that mega-huge post-holiday hangover. This is not the headache, regret and misery you get from attending too many Christmas parties or whooping it up like a holiday-happy lush. This is the headache, regret and misery you get from overindulging on gift purchases, whipping out the plastic one too many times for things you can't really afford and then realizing you have to pay that bill - with interest. I kicked the habit a few years ago, but life as a recovering overspender in the heyday of easy credit was hard.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | December 24, 2003
LOS ANGELES - As shoppers mind their finances this season, the oft-forgotten but still useful layaway plan has re-emerged as a way to avoid debt. Many stores discontinued the practice years ago as more and more consumers obtained credit cards, allowing them to purchase beyond their means. But for those that still offer the reserve-now, pay-later service, interest remains high. From discounters like Kmart to specialty shops like Guitar Center, many stores still see value in letting their shoppers set aside an item, then pay it off and pick it up when they're able.
NEWS
December 29, 2011
I recently read about the people who paid for others' Christmas gifts on layaway ("Donating thousands, 'layaway angels' land in Maryland," Dec. 22). It made my heart glad knowing we still have people who show their love and compassion for others instead of thinking only of themselves. Wouldn't it be wonderful if we all could show others love and compassion not just at Christmas, but throughout the entire year? Love conquers all. Let's show others the true meaning of love each and every day. Timothy Modlin
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2011
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for partly sunny skies and a high temperature around 53 degrees. The low temperature is expected to be around 33 degrees with partly cloudy skies tonight. TRAFFIC Here are today's morning traffic issues . FROM LAST NIGHT... State House dome dazzles after restoration work : The last of the scaffolding that enclosed the dome of the State House since summer will come down Friday -- leaving Annapolis with an uncluttered view of its most famous landmark just in time for Christmas.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2011
Robin Walker, unable to sleep, called up her online layaway account in the middle of the night, ready to make some grim choices about which presents her grandchildren wouldn't get. The answer, she feared, was most of them. She opened the first account, shocked to see the balance read "$1. " A computer glitch, she suspected. But when the second account said the same thing, as did the one after that, she started laughing. Someone, she began to realize, had paid all five of her layaway accounts down to a dollar.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2011
In the annals of holiday nostalgia, it's hardly up there in "Christmas Carol" territory. Still, the news that layaways are back has me feeling less Scrooge-like than I usually do when the holiday spend-a-thon season approaches. Major retailers like Walmart, you might have seen, are bringing back or expanding their layaway programs — those old, pay-by-installment plans that went by the wayside when credit cards became all too common. I'm not really a layaway type myself, but I'm glad it's made a comeback anyway.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | andrea.walker@baltsun.com | November 25, 2009
With consumers leery of piling up credit card debt, more and more retailers are reviving a service that had been given up for dead: layaway. Kmart began offering Internet layaway this year, and sister company Sears expanded its service to the Internet this year. Online site eLayaway.com has seen its business grow. Toys "R" Us announced last month it would bring back layaway on more expensive items such as bikes and cribs, though not yet in Maryland. Promotions for layaway - which allows consumers to pay for merchandise in installments - have picked up as stores prepare for a challenging holiday season.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | November 25, 2009
With consumers leery of piling up credit card debt, more and more retailers are reviving a service that had been given up for dead: layaway. Kmart began offering Internet layaway this year, and sister company Sears expanded its service to the Internet this year. Online site eLayaway.com has seen its business grow. Toys "R" Us announced last month it would bring back layaway on more expensive items such as bikes and cribs, though not yet in Maryland. Promotions for layaway - which allows consumers to pay for merchandise in installments - have picked up as stores prepare for a challenging holiday season.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 3, 2009
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -Maybe it was right after Rich Hill left for his magnetic resonance imaging yesterday morning. Maybe it was when manager Dave Trembley was fawning over 2008 top draft choice Brian Matusz before the Orioles defeated the Boston Red Sox in the early afternoon. Maybe it was after Brad Bergesen pitched three scoreless innings in that 5-3 victory at Fort Lauderdale Stadium. Maybe it all came together to take me back in time to another training camp in another sport. Of course, I'm talking about Ravens training camp last year, when general manager Ozzie Newsome and coach John Harbaugh started out with every intention of bringing rookie quarterback Joe Flacco along slowly but finally had to surrender to circumstance and move the future up a year.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | February 16, 2008
More than 500 current and former Maryland brides-to-be have cash coming their way as part of a settlement between the state's attorney general and David's Bridal, the national discount dress chain. David's Bridal has agreed to pay more than $33,000 in restitution, plus $30,000 in penalties and legal costs, for allegedly charging consumers excessive layaway cancellation fees during the past four years, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler announced yesterday. The company, which has five shops in Maryland, routinely billed buyers a 25 percent forfeiture fee if they canceled a layaway order, according to Gansler.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2011
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for partly sunny skies and a high temperature around 53 degrees. The low temperature is expected to be around 33 degrees with partly cloudy skies tonight. TRAFFIC Here are today's morning traffic issues . FROM LAST NIGHT... State House dome dazzles after restoration work : The last of the scaffolding that enclosed the dome of the State House since summer will come down Friday -- leaving Annapolis with an uncluttered view of its most famous landmark just in time for Christmas.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | November 23, 2008
We haven't even started imbibing yet, and already most of us are preparing for that mega-huge post-holiday hangover. This is not the headache, regret and misery you get from attending too many Christmas parties or whooping it up like a holiday-happy lush. This is the headache, regret and misery you get from overindulging on gift purchases, whipping out the plastic one too many times for things you can't really afford and then realizing you have to pay that bill - with interest. I kicked the habit a few years ago, but life as a recovering overspender in the heyday of easy credit was hard.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
Nkeng Bailey is determined to give her son and daughter a nice Christmas, but she knows she'll have to make some sacrifices in these tough economic times, such as buying an acoustic guitar for her son instead of the more expensive electric one. Last week, the 33-year-old geriatric nursing assistant loaded a cart at Kmart with board games, teddy bears, a football and dolls. Then she put all the gifts on layaway to help her better manage holiday spending and "make sure we can still eat and I can keep the heat on."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.