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By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1996
Around the Towson Court House, Judge Dana Levitz has carved out a reputation as a tough, fair-minded jurist, a big man with a bigger voice.Few know of his second career: travel consultant.Next month, Judge Levitz and his wife, Dale, will lead a group of 44 judges, lawyers and others with ties to the legal community on a one-day theater excursion to Manhattan. Over four years, the couple has played host to about a half-dozen such trips, including a week-long cruise.For each itinerary, Judge Levitz and his wife pick trip dates.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | April 17, 2005
THOUGH Congress and the president want to make it harder for consumers to wipe out their debts through bankruptcy, some lawyers and judges are taking a different approach: They are trying to make sure that people never get into financial straits in the first place. They are doing so by reaching out to those on the verge of getting their first credit cards - high school juniors and seniors and college freshmen. Lawyers and judges around the country visit classrooms and tell students tales from the bankruptcy court front.
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NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 30, 2002
ROME - Rarely do people rush to the defense of divorce lawyers, but Italians did yesterday, the day after Pope John Paul II called on Catholic lawyers and judges to abstain from handling divorce cases. Newspapers and commentators across Italy criticized the pontiff for telling an audience of attorneys that they "must avoid personal involvement in what could be seen as cooperation with divorce." An editorial in Corriere della Sera, Italy's most respected newspaper, characterized the pope's views as fundamentalist.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 20, 2003
MOSUL, Iraq - For one New Jersey judge, Iraq may be his greatest trial. Donald F. Campbell, who usually presides over custody and murder cases in Toms River, N.J., now has the task of resurrecting the system of courts, jails and prisons for this nation of 24 million people. Campbell, who holds the rank of major general in the Army Reserve, has engaged in nation-building projects in places such as Vietnam and Haiti. But he has never attempted anything like this. "This is something I've been doing for a long time," he says, "but it is on a much bigger scale."
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1999
The Howard County Women's Bar Association is dispatching female lawyers and judges to middle school classrooms to speak with pupils about the legal profession and answer such questions as "Why does Judge Judy act the way she does?""We're getting them to think about different aspects of the law," said Ria Rothvarg, chairwoman of the Law Day committee of the Women's Bar Association.Since 1996, female lawyers and judges have been speaking to Howard County middle schoolers. Rothvarg said they are trying to reach eighth-graders who are learning about the U.S. Constitution and just beginning to think about careers.
NEWS
September 16, 1993
E. McMaster Duer, retired chief judge of the 1st Judicial Circuit on the Eastern Shore, died Monday of heart failure at his home, Brentwood Farm in Princess Anne. He was 82.Judge Duer retired in 1975. He was appointed to the Circuit Court bench in 1952 and became chief judge in 1969. His father, Robert F. Duer, had served on the same bench before him.Lawyers and judges who knew McMaster Duer praised him for his common sense. Charles E. Hearne Jr., a former law partner in Salisbury, added that he was "a congenial person and a great storyteller" and "was well-liked even by lawyers he ruled against."
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2002
The crime was make-believe and the proceedings were rushed and incomplete, but for the six Russian judicial officials sitting in a Howard County jury box yesterday, the mock trial still offered an enlightening glimpse at the future. This bit of theater - complete with lawyerly posturing and pacing, attacks on credibility and a judge who managed to stay above the fray - was intended to give the Russians a chance to observe the workings of an American trial by jury as they prepare to launch their own jury system.
NEWS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1996
Where does a trial judge or a defense lawyer turn when the unexpected occurs during a murder trial?Say, the defendant, a beloved Heisman Trophy winner, is writing a best-selling book from his prison cell?Starting today, participants in celebrated cases have a place to go: the High-Profile Trial Mentor Team.Few teams have a more impressive lineup. Members include lawyers and judges from some of the most intensely covered criminal trials in U.S. history -- those of Manuel Noriega, Susan Smith, Jeffrey Dahmer and O. J. Simpson.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | April 17, 2005
THOUGH Congress and the president want to make it harder for consumers to wipe out their debts through bankruptcy, some lawyers and judges are taking a different approach: They are trying to make sure that people never get into financial straits in the first place. They are doing so by reaching out to those on the verge of getting their first credit cards - high school juniors and seniors and college freshmen. Lawyers and judges around the country visit classrooms and tell students tales from the bankruptcy court front.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1996
It's far from your ordinary courtroom.For starters, it has no roof. Judges, lawyers and litigants gather under a large tent, a la Ringling Bros.Its location is improbable, on the fringes of the bustling state fair grounds in Timonium. During a trial, testimony might be interrupted by a carnival barker or drowned out by a bellowing cow.Then there are the jurors. They wear ball caps and sunglasses if they like. They wander in and out as they please. They operate under the most liberal dress policy of any court in America.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2002
The crime was make-believe and the proceedings were rushed and incomplete, but for the six Russian judicial officials sitting in a Howard County jury box yesterday, the mock trial still offered an enlightening glimpse at the future. This bit of theater - complete with lawyerly posturing and pacing, attacks on credibility and a judge who managed to stay above the fray - was intended to give the Russians a chance to observe the workings of an American trial by jury as they prepare to launch their own jury system.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2002
The crime was make-believe and the proceedings were rushed and incomplete, but for the six Russian judicial officials sitting in a Howard County jury box yesterday, the mock trial still offered an enlightening glimpse at the future. This bit of theater -- complete with lawyerly posturing and pacing, attacks on credibility and a judge who managed to stay above the fray -- was intended to give the Russians a chance to observe the workings of an American trial by jury as they prepare to launch their own jury system.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 30, 2002
ROME - Rarely do people rush to the defense of divorce lawyers, but Italians did yesterday, the day after Pope John Paul II called on Catholic lawyers and judges to abstain from handling divorce cases. Newspapers and commentators across Italy criticized the pontiff for telling an audience of attorneys that they "must avoid personal involvement in what could be seen as cooperation with divorce." An editorial in Corriere della Sera, Italy's most respected newspaper, characterized the pope's views as fundamentalist.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2000
You're a lawyer with a tremendous legal headache - you've got clients who don't want their case to drag on for years and run up tens of thousands of dollars in legal fees. Whom do you call? Lawyers and judges in Maryland would give you the telephone number of a man they say is one of the state's smartest peacemakers: retired Judge Howard S. Chasanow. "You can't stump him," said one of his oldest friends, Prince George's Circuit Judge Joseph S. Casula. Chasanow, a retired Court of Appeals judge, has found a new career as a mediator, who is called upon to settle complicated legal disputes before they get to trial.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1999
The Howard County Women's Bar Association is dispatching female lawyers and judges to middle school classrooms to speak with pupils about the legal profession and answer such questions as "Why does Judge Judy act the way she does?""We're getting them to think about different aspects of the law," said Ria Rothvarg, chairwoman of the Law Day committee of the Women's Bar Association.Since 1996, female lawyers and judges have been speaking to Howard County middle schoolers. Rothvarg said they are trying to reach eighth-graders who are learning about the U.S. Constitution and just beginning to think about careers.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Scott Higham and Caitlin Francke and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1999
In Baltimore's halls of justice, punishment often comes before a trial.Suspects wait behind bars for months, sometimes years, for their cases to reach juries. Indigent defendants have been denied the right to lawyers. One man openly pleaded for a trial, only to be told by judges he had to stay in jail and wait some more.In the past year, a series of people suspected of commiting serious crimes, even murder, have been released because of bungling by court officials and prosecutors who were simply unable to get together and try them.
NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | September 14, 1990
Although the administrative judge for the Baltimore Circuit Court called Judge Thomas Ward's remarks "unnecessary and inappropriate," Ward says he doesn't regret comments he made about defense attorneys that led to the dismissal of potential jurors in a murder case."
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2002
The crime was make-believe and the proceedings were rushed and incomplete, but for the six Russian judicial officials sitting in a Howard County jury box yesterday, the mock trial still offered an enlightening glimpse at the future. This bit of theater -- complete with lawyerly posturing and pacing, attacks on credibility and a judge who managed to stay above the fray -- was intended to give the Russians a chance to observe the workings of an American trial by jury as they prepare to launch their own jury system.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1998
In Baltimore, punishment for criminal defendants sometimes comes before their cases are tried. That's not justice, Baltimore's chief judge said yesterday.Yet it is so common and so long-standing, people in the system have special names for the way suspected criminals spend weeks or months in jail only to come into court and see their cases dropped or be sentenced to jail time they have served.The police call it "abatement by arrest." BaltimoreCircuit Administrative Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan calls it "summary judgment."
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