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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
If state Sen. Brian Frosh has his way, voters will pick Maryland's next attorney general based on experience - his 28 years in the General Assembly, 11 of them as a committee chairman who pushed through measures such as the state's new gun control law. Del. Jon S. Cardin wants citizens to focus more on his vision for fighting cyber crimes - computer attacks he calls the law-enforcement issue of the future. And Del. Aisha N. Braveboy is hoping folks are concerned enough about social-justice issues to prefer her hands-on legal work to protect families from foreclosure and young people facing imprisonment.
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NEWS
June 8, 2014
It is a rare pleasure in any election year (and perhaps this one more than most) to have a candidate for state-wide office we can endorse so enthusiastically as we do Brian Frosh in the Democratic primary for attorney general. In his career in the General Assembly, he has distinguished himself as a considerate and effective legislator, and we have no doubt that he would excel as Maryland's top lawyer. Mr. Frosh has represented Montgomery County in the state Senate since 1995 and was in the House of Delegates for two terms before that.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
Now that Ray Rice has held a widely criticized news conference Friday that included some awkward, off-the-cuff moments and no public apology to his wife, just months after their physical altercation at an Atlantic City, N.J., casino, the Ravens' star running back is hoping for a much smoother experience on the football field. That return could be delayed, though, by a punishment under the NFL's personal-conduct policy. The Ravens are bracing for a potential multiple-game suspension, but no discipline has been determined, and Rice is expected to meet soon with commissioner Roger Goodell.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
Charlotte J. "Jean" Vieta, a former laboratory assistant who later earned a law degree, died May 5 of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, at her Monkton home. She was 66. The daughter of William Purdum, an electrical engineer, and Charlotte Purdum, a homemaker, Charlotte Jean Purdum was born in Baltimore and raised at her family's home on Manor Road in Baldwin. After graduating in 1965 from Dulaney High School, she earned a bachelor's degree in biology at what is now Towson University.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 16, 2014
A note about Jeff Yeatman: I sought him out; he did not contact me. Until I asked, he'd never given an interview about the random act of madness that occurred 15 years ago near his office in downtown Baltimore. "I actively avoided it at the time," he says, "because I resented the idea that I had to share something very fresh and awful just because other people found it interesting. " I came across his name while searching Google for articles about walking to work. This headline, from The Baltimore Sun of Feb. 3, 1999, popped up: "Lawyer wounded walking to work.
NEWS
May 9, 2014
Each of us has had the privilege of serving as second in command of the Maryland Attorney General's Office. We've seen first hand how important the office is to citizens and businesses in Maryland, and we know that state Sen. Brian Frosh has the judgment, experience and courage it takes to be an effective champion for the people of Maryland. Brian has been a hardworking and highly regarded member of the legislature since his election in 1986 and, since 2003, chairman of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Criminal suspects in Maryland will have free access to lawyers at their first court appearances as soon as July, a top judiciary official said Tuesday, as the state struggles to comply with a court order that has been delayed for months amid concerns about its cost. The change, mandated by the Maryland Court of Appeals as a way to treat suspects more fairly before trial, has challenged all three branches of government. The General Assembly could not agree on a plan to restructure the pretrial release system, opting instead to put aside $10 million to pay for lawyers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Evelyn W. Pasquier, who as a senior associate with the old Baltimore law firm of Frank, Bernstein, Conaway and Goldman played a pivotal role in the resolution of the Maryland savings and loan crisis of the mid-1980s, died April 24 in her sleep of unknown causes at her Symphony Center home on Bolton Hill. She was 83. "Evelyn was my right-hand person when Gov. Harry R. Hughes asked me to take charge in all matters relating to Old Court Savings and Loan in 1985," said Shale D. Stiller, who is now a partner at DLA Piper.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
Death row inmate Jody Lee Miles asked an appeals court this week to rule that Maryland's death penalty repeal applies to inmates who were already sentenced to die when executions were outlawed last year. Attorneys for Miles, who was convicted in a 1997 murder on the Eastern Shore, said the General Assembly was so thorough in its dismantling of the laws that governed capital punishment in Maryland that the state no longer has the authority to kill anyone. "Mr. Miles cannot be executed and his sentence must be set aside," the attorneys wrote.
FEATURES
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
Like a lot of break ups, the end of Nick Bergeris' marriage was complicated, according to court documents. Yes, he moved out after wife took out a protective order against him. And, yes, he eventually filed for divorce. But even then the couple spent a few nights together. All that stopped by March 2011, though, and so the following year Bergeris thought they had been separated for 12 months and were clear to get a divorce. Living apart for a year is one among a number of grounds for divorce in Maryland.
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