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NEWS
By VICKIE J. GRAY | April 27, 1995
An article by Vickie J. Gray on the Opinion * Commentary page Thursday incorrectly identified her as the president of the Baltimore chapter of the National Law Firm Merchandising Association. In fact, she is immediate past president.The Sun regrets the errors.One of the more disturbing elements of the recent Nathaniel Hurt trial is that the defendant hired a lawyer who had not tried a murder case in 10 years. That lawyer, Stephen L. Miles, allowed Hurt to reject a plea bargain that would have spared him jail time for fatally shooting a boy; he then was convicted and sentenced to prison.
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NEWS
October 10, 1997
VENABLE, BAETJER and Howard may never air a television commercial hyped with blaring sirens or the solicitation, ''Let's talk about it.'' But its decision to hire an advertising agency has narrowed the great divide between the venerable firm and the camera-ready lawyers whom traditional firms always have despised.Establishment legal offices and bar associations long have frowned upon the practice of lawyer advertising, even after the U.S. Supreme Court deemed it a free speech protection 20 years ago. Until recently, the line of demarcation was clear: Traditional firms with big business clients never, ever advertised; personal injury lawyers looking for a good case had no qualms about promoting themselves.
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BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 9, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The chairman of a Senate committee considering bills to clamp down on lawyer advertising warned lawyers opposed to the bills two weeks ago that efforts to kill them were probably too late, because not only had the train left the station, "it's at the second stop."But the legal profession managed this week to derail the locomotive.A state bar association panel proposed this week its own set of restrictions by which the profession can police itself. So Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., who sponsored some of the bills, said yesterday that he has asked the Judicial Proceedings Committee not to take any action on the advertising bills for two weeks.
BUSINESS
By MARK HYMAN and MARK HYMAN,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1995
In Florida, lawyers pitching their services on television must flash a sobering disclaimer warning viewers: "The selection of a lawyer is an important one and should not be based on advertising alone."Nevada's code of ethical conduct bars actors in commercials from portraying lawyers, but not clients.Iowa has the simplest rule of all -- it doesn't permit lawyers to advertise on TV.TTC Lawyer advertising has evolved in unpredictable ways since it first appeared on TV screens in 1977, when a landmark Supreme Court decision struck down state bans on it.Some states heavily regulate what lawyers can communicate.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Evening Sun Staff | July 2, 1991
A new survey asks Maryland residents to help render a verdict on the booming practice of lawyer advertising.The Maryland State Bar Association is in the process of conducting a public opinion study to determine the impact of lawyer advertising on the state's citizens. The bar association embarked on the project in response to the heated debate among legislators and judicial officials.Officially, the survey began Monday, June 17, but the bar association has not yet received any responses. The organization would like citizens to send their written views on the benefits, effects, impressions, results and influence generated by lawyer ads."
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | November 16, 1991
The Rules Committee of the Maryland Court of Appeals gave preliminary approval yesterday to four new guidelines regulating lawyer advertising, in an industry-backed move designed to head off a revival of legislative proposals that would have imposed much tighter restrictions.The proposals now will come before the Court of Appeals for final consideration, said Janet Eveleth, a spokeswoman for the Maryland State Bar Association. "I don't know what the time frame is," she said. "I would say at least two months."
BUSINESS
By MARK HYMAN and MARK HYMAN,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1995
In Florida, lawyers pitching their services on television must flash a sobering disclaimer warning viewers: "The selection of a lawyer is an important one and should not be based on advertising alone."Nevada's code of ethical conduct bars actors in commercials from portraying lawyers, but not clients.Iowa has the simplest rule of all -- it doesn't permit lawyers to advertise on TV.TTC Lawyer advertising has evolved in unpredictable ways since it first appeared on TV screens in 1977, when a landmark Supreme Court decision struck down state bans on it.Some states heavily regulate what lawyers can communicate.
NEWS
October 10, 1997
VENABLE, BAETJER and Howard may never air a television commercial hyped with blaring sirens or the solicitation, ''Let's talk about it.'' But its decision to hire an advertising agency has narrowed the great divide between the venerable firm and the camera-ready lawyers whom traditional firms always have despised.Establishment legal offices and bar associations long have frowned upon the practice of lawyer advertising, even after the U.S. Supreme Court deemed it a free speech protection 20 years ago. Until recently, the line of demarcation was clear: Traditional firms with big business clients never, ever advertised; personal injury lawyers looking for a good case had no qualms about promoting themselves.
NEWS
April 23, 1992
TCNew rules for lawyers who advertiseIn the April 16 "It's Your Call" you asked readers to offer their views on the new rules restricting lawyer advertising approved by the Maryland Court of Appeals that take effect July 1. But readers' responses regarding the "fairness" of the new rules will be difficult to measure, since all three were presented incorrectly in your solicitation.First, you stated that celebrity endorsements by non-lawyers will not be allowed. Wrong -- non-client endorsements are not allowed.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 12, 1992
Looking for schlock?Consider the Wisconsin electric chair ad:Zoom to the inmate in the striped prison shirt being strapped into the death seat.The chaplain asks, "Any last words?""Yes," the inmate replies. "I wish I'd called the Legal Clinic."Tacky commercials like these have alienated a generation of traditional lawyers who think their profession looks cheap enough without them.But 15 years after the Supreme Court told lawyers it was all right to make their pitch to the public, even some old school attorneys say advertising may not be so bad.In fact, battered by the recession and facing skeptical clients, established firms are doing some genteel advertising of their own. Only they call it marketing.
NEWS
By VICKIE J. GRAY | April 27, 1995
An article by Vickie J. Gray on the Opinion * Commentary page Thursday incorrectly identified her as the president of the Baltimore chapter of the National Law Firm Merchandising Association. In fact, she is immediate past president.The Sun regrets the errors.One of the more disturbing elements of the recent Nathaniel Hurt trial is that the defendant hired a lawyer who had not tried a murder case in 10 years. That lawyer, Stephen L. Miles, allowed Hurt to reject a plea bargain that would have spared him jail time for fatally shooting a boy; he then was convicted and sentenced to prison.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 12, 1992
Looking for schlock?Consider the Wisconsin electric chair ad:Zoom to the inmate in the striped prison shirt being strapped into the death seat.The chaplain asks, "Any last words?""Yes," the inmate replies. "I wish I'd called the Legal Clinic."Tacky commercials like these have alienated a generation of traditional lawyers who think their profession looks cheap enough without them.But 15 years after the Supreme Court told lawyers it was all right to make their pitch to the public, even some old school attorneys say advertising may not be so bad.In fact, battered by the recession and facing skeptical clients, established firms are doing some genteel advertising of their own. Only they call it marketing.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 12, 1992
Looking for schlock?Consider the Wisconsin electric chair ad:Zoom to the inmate in the striped prison shirt being strapped into the death seat.The chaplain asks, "Any last words?""Yes," the inmate replies. "I wish I'd called the Legal Clinic."Tacky commercials like these have alienated a generation of traditional lawyers who think their profession looks cheap enough without them.But 15 years after the Supreme Court told lawyers it was all right to make their pitch to the public, even some old-school attorneys say advertising may not be so bad.In fact, battered by the recession and facing skeptical clients, established firms are doing some genteel advertising of their own. Only they call it marketing.
NEWS
April 23, 1992
TCNew rules for lawyers who advertiseIn the April 16 "It's Your Call" you asked readers to offer their views on the new rules restricting lawyer advertising approved by the Maryland Court of Appeals that take effect July 1. But readers' responses regarding the "fairness" of the new rules will be difficult to measure, since all three were presented incorrectly in your solicitation.First, you stated that celebrity endorsements by non-lawyers will not be allowed. Wrong -- non-client endorsements are not allowed.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | November 16, 1991
The Rules Committee of the Maryland Court of Appeals gave preliminary approval yesterday to four new guidelines regulating lawyer advertising, in an industry-backed move designed to head off a revival of legislative proposals that would have imposed much tighter restrictions.The proposals now will come before the Court of Appeals for final consideration, said Janet Eveleth, a spokeswoman for the Maryland State Bar Association. "I don't know what the time frame is," she said. "I would say at least two months."
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Evening Sun Staff | July 2, 1991
A new survey asks Maryland residents to help render a verdict on the booming practice of lawyer advertising.The Maryland State Bar Association is in the process of conducting a public opinion study to determine the impact of lawyer advertising on the state's citizens. The bar association embarked on the project in response to the heated debate among legislators and judicial officials.Officially, the survey began Monday, June 17, but the bar association has not yet received any responses. The organization would like citizens to send their written views on the benefits, effects, impressions, results and influence generated by lawyer ads."
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 12, 1992
Looking for schlock?Consider the Wisconsin electric chair ad:Zoom to the inmate in the striped prison shirt being strapped into the death seat.The chaplain asks, "Any last words?""Yes," the inmate replies. "I wish I'd called the Legal Clinic."Tacky commercials like these have alienated a generation of traditional lawyers who think their profession looks cheap enough without them.But 15 years after the Supreme Court told lawyers it was all right to make their pitch to the public, even some old-school attorneys say advertising may not be so bad.In fact, battered by the recession and facing skeptical clients, established firms are doing some genteel advertising of their own. Only they call it marketing.
NEWS
January 2, 1991
America is not a 'Christian nation'Blaming the ills of society on the lack of prayer in school as Billie Thompson does (Forum, Dec. 21) is simplistic and unwarranted. Those ills, drugs and crime, are primarily economic in origin and would still be with us regardless.Moreover, the Supreme Court did not declare it unconstitutional for children to pray in school. To say it did is a gross misrepresentation. A child can pray privately anytime in school. What the court said, in effect, is that the state has no business imposing religion on anyone.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 9, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The chairman of a Senate committee considering bills to clamp down on lawyer advertising warned lawyers opposed to the bills two weeks ago that efforts to kill them were probably too late, because not only had the train left the station, "it's at the second stop."But the legal profession managed this week to derail the locomotive.A state bar association panel proposed this week its own set of restrictions by which the profession can police itself. So Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., who sponsored some of the bills, said yesterday that he has asked the Judicial Proceedings Committee not to take any action on the advertising bills for two weeks.
NEWS
January 2, 1991
America is not a 'Christian nation'Blaming the ills of society on the lack of prayer in school as Billie Thompson does (Forum, Dec. 21) is simplistic and unwarranted. Those ills, drugs and crime, are primarily economic in origin and would still be with us regardless.Moreover, the Supreme Court did not declare it unconstitutional for children to pray in school. To say it did is a gross misrepresentation. A child can pray privately anytime in school. What the court said, in effect, is that the state has no business imposing religion on anyone.
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