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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
The North Carolina Court of Appeals is allowing a lawsuit to proceed in which the Atlantic Coast Conference seeks to compel the University of Maryland to pay a $52 million exit fee for leaving the conference next year. Maryland had argued that there was no authority for a court in another state to permit the suit to continue. But the ACC, which is based in North Carolina, countered that Maryland was bound by the equivalent of a contract -- the ACC constitution. “The ACC alleges that the University of Maryland's withdrawal from the ACC subjects them to a mandatory withdrawal payment in the amount of $52,266,342,” a three-judge appeals court panel said in its decision today.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Howard County is asking a federal court to throw out a former Fire Department battalion chief's lawsuit, arguing that the Facebook posts that triggered his dismissal were not constitutionally protected because they were "at best, personal opinion or pique and, at worst, insubordinate. " The response, filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court, follows a suit brought last month by Kevin P. Buker. The county argues that posts on Buker's personal Facebook page early this year did not involve "a matter of public concern" - a key element in cases involving the First Amendment rights of public employees.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Though a Baltimore County jury agreed that former cardiologist Mark Midei placed stents in Glenn Weinberg's heart unnecessarily, one juror said panel members did not all agree that the procedure caused the prominent businessman to miss out on a stake in Maryland's largest casino. "It was hard to prove that the main factor of him missing out on Maryland Live was the placement of the stents," said Eric D. Goodman, who was juror No. 7 during the six-week trial. Weinberg was an executive with the Cordish Cos., which took on the Anne Arundel County casino project while he was recuperating.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Retired Ravens middle linebacker Ray Lewis is among a group of 16 current and former NFL players who are suing BB&T Bank for nearly $60 million in alleged investment losses. The Baltimore Sun has obtained a copy of the lawsuit, which was first reported by Yahoo! Sports . The lawsuit alleges that Lewis, a two-time NFL Defensive Player of the Year who retired following the Ravens' Super Bowl XLVII victory in February, lost $3.778 million. Lewis' agent, David Dunn, didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought by a Naval Academy midshipmen who sought the removal of the academy's superintendent in a sexual assault case involving her classmates. U.S. District Judge Ellen Hollander granted the Navy's motion to dismiss the case last week. The female midshipman who brought the lawsuit did not object. The midshipman had argued that the superintendent, Vice Adm. Michael Miller, was biased and shouldn't be allowed to decide whether to prosecute three midshipmen, all former football players, who were accused of sexual assault at an off-campus party in April 2012.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
The family of a man who died in police custody has filed a multimillion-dollar lawsuit against Baltimore police, alleging that Anthony Anderson Sr. was viciously beaten by three officers before he died. The suit, filed in Baltimore federal court late last week, names as defendants the three detectives involved in the arrest Sept. 21, 2012 - Todd A. Strohman, Gregory Boyd and Michael Vodarick - as well as the Baltimore Police Department. "Defendant Strohman placed Anderson Sr., in handcuffs and Defendants Strohman, Vodarick, and Boyd, began to intentionally or negligently, violently and repeatedly kick Anderson Sr., in the ribs, stomach, back, and chest for several minutes maliciously and sadistically for the very purpose of causing harm," the 86-page complaint alleges.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Three restaurant workers at Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport have filed a collective action lawsuit that accuses the operator of five airport restaurants of failing to pay minimum and overtime wages. The federal lawsuit, filed Oct. 11 in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, alleged Aero Service Group Inc. had a policy of paying hourly workers two separate paychecks for the same pay period and failing to pay overtime for more than 40 hours worked in a week.
FEATURES
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
John Arthur, a terminally ill Ohio man who chartered a private medical jet to Maryland to get married, died Tuesday, according to his lawyer. He was 47. Spurred by a recent ruling on same-sex marriage by the Supreme Court, Arthur and his partner, Jim Obergefell, were married on a runway at Baltimore-Washington International Airport on July 11. Friends and family funded the trip because Ohio prohibits same-sex marriage and Arthur, who suffered from...
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2013
A group of Maryland watermen has filed suit seeking to overturn the state's catch limit on menhaden, arguing that it violates state and federal law and that the forage fish is not in need of conservation. In a filing Friday in Dorchester County Circuit Court, two founding members of the Harvesters Land and Sea Coalition ask for a temporary restraining order blocking the state from enforcing catch rules on menhaden imposed this year. A spokesman for the group contends in a statement that Maryland's catch limit is unscientific and unfair, noting that 80 percent of all the menhaden allowed to be caught along the Atlantic coast would go to one company, Omega Protein in Reedville, Va. The state Department of Natural Resources released a statement Monday saying Maryland's menhaden limits are legal, scientifically supported and required under federal law to reduce harvest pressure.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
The U.S. Navy has asked a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit that seeks removal of the Naval Academy superintendent from a high-profile sexual assault case. The alleged sexual assault victim has agreed not to oppose the motion to dismiss, according to court documents filed Thursday. U.S. District Judge Ellen Hollander has already ruled that she doesn't have jurisdiction over the military's justice system in regard to the lawsuit. She made that ruling earlier this month after the alleged victim sought an injunction to have Superintendent Vice Adm. Michael Miller removed while the suit was pending.
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