Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLawsuit
IN THE NEWS

Lawsuit

SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
A lawsuit filed by Maryland basketball player Dez Wells against Xavier University last year was dismissed Thursday after a financial settlement was reached. The Cincinnati judge said the deal was "satisfactory to both parties. " Peter Ginsberg, Wells' New York-based attorney, declined comment. Wells could not be reached for comment. Wells sued his former school for defamation and violation of his right for a fair hearing after he was expelled from the university after his freshman year.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
A prospective student at the Community College of Baltimore County sued school officials in federal court this week, contending that he was denied admission to an academic program based on an expression of his religious beliefs. Brandon Jenkins, who is being represented by the Washington-based American Center for Law and Justice, said in the lawsuit that when asked what was most important to him during an interview with CCBC officials as part of the application process last spring, he responded: "My God. " Shortly afterward, he was denied admission into the radiation therapy program, and he asked the program coordinator for an explanation in an email.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
A federal judge in Washington has dismissed the high-profile discrimination lawsuit of a Gallaudet University official who claimed she was unfairly demoted for signing a petition to put Maryland's same-sex marriage law to referendum. U.S. District Judge James E. Boasberg ruled April 14 that Angela McCaskill, Gallaudet's former chief diversity officer, had failed to show she had been discriminated against under the D.C. Human Right's Act -- whether for her religion, political beliefs or identity as a straight woman -- or that the university had acted negligently.
BUSINESS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
An Annapolis medical practice will pay $22,500 to a former employee who claimed she was discriminated against because she was pregnant. Officials for Annapolis Internal Medicine said Tuesday they agreed to the payment to settle a lawsuit filed last year by the U.S. Equal Opportunity Commission on behalf of the employee. Jonathan P. Kagan, an attorney for Annapolis Internal Medicine, said the doctors decided to settle rather than bear the expense of defending it at trial. The doctors deny any wrongdoing, he said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Dan McCall sells a lot of T-shirts, coffee cups and other products that tweak the government, so his designs parodying the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security were pretty typical fare. Until the cease-and-desist demands hit. The situation turned into a First Amendment primer - that it is, in fact, OK to use government agency seals to lampoon or criticize. McCall sued, his case handled pro bono by Public Citizen in Washington and Baltimore attorney Ezra Gollogly, and the two agencies agreed in a settlement to reverse course.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
A lesbian couple married in Massachusetts filed a lawsuit this week looking for recognition of their marriage in Puerto Rico. Ada Conde and Ivonne Alvarez married in Massachusetts in 2004. Because Puerto Rico signed a law in 1999 that defined marriage as between a man and a woman, the couple's union is not recognized in the commonwealth. "We wish to enjoy the same social privileges and contractual rights that are conferred by the Commonwealth on individuals in opposite-sex marriages," Conde and Alvarez write in the lawsuit .  In the lawsuit, Conde writes that Puerto Rico's lack of recognition for her marriage prevented Alvarez from making medical decisions during Conde's daughter's heart surgery.
NEWS
Quinn Kelley, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
The family of a 10-year-old girl who suffered a fractured skull and cheekbones when she was struck by a baseball before a Baltimore Orioles game last season has filed a lawsuit against the ballclub. According to the lawsuit, Jennifer Dempsey and her stepfather Joseph Kraft attended a baseball game at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on August 23, 2013. They arrived at the game early and an usher, whose identity is unknown, told them they had to wait two minutes for the stadium's seating bowl to open.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
A federal judge this week allowed a Baltimore man's lawsuit against Ticketmaster's fees to move forward. U.S. District Judge Ellen Hollander dismissed several of Andre Bourgeois' claims – including allegations that the Live Nation company engaged in "negligent misrepresentation" and "fraud" – but said he could proceed with the core of his case. Bourgeois is seeking to win a class-action judgment against the ticket-seller after he said he was overcharged at a 2009 Jackson Browne concert at the Lyric Opera House . Maryland's highest court has ruled that Ticketmaster's fees violate a 1948 Baltimore ordinance designed to curb scalping of Navy football tickets, and which barred companies from charging fees in excess of 50 cents on top of a ticket's stated price.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
A U.S. District Court judge on Wednesday upheld many of the claims in Terps guard Dez Wells' lawsuit against Xavier, which expelled him in 2012 after the then-Musketeers freshman star was accused of sexual assault. Judge Arthur Spiegel, according to media reports, dismissed a request by Wells to explore the decision of the school's conduct board to expel him, saying the statute of limitations had passed. He also threw out specific charges against the university president, the Rev. Michael Graham.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 12, 2014
The New Jersey high school senior who moved in with a friend after disputes with her parents and then sued them for financial support returned home Wednesday. I described this family drama in my Monday column. Rachel Canning, who left home in October, had asked a judge to require her parents to pay her Catholic high school tuition, her lawyer's fees, her college tuition and more than $650 a week in support. A judge had refused her request for immediate financial relief but had scheduled a full hearing on the matter for April.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.