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Lawsuit

NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
An Anne Arundel County judge on Wednesday dismissed a lawsuit brought by supporters of gubernatorial candidate Douglas F. Gansler who wanted to prevent his Democratic rivals from raising money during the General Assembly session. Judge William C. Mulford II dismissed the case — at the request of the lawyer for the Gansler supporters. Attorney Daniel Clements said his clients got what they wanted out of the case: a promise from Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown that his running mate, Ken Ulman, wouldn't raise money during the session.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
Opponents of the $1.5 billion State Center project asked a Circuit Court judge Wednesday to dismiss the state's legal action against them, arguing that they have a First Amendment right to go to court to protest plans to redevelop the aging government office complex in midtown Baltimore. More than two hours of arguments by attorneys from both sides ended without a decision by Baltimore Circuit Judge Althea M. Handy. "We're allowed to object, and we're allowed to say we don't like your project," Alan M. Rifkin, an attorney for the redevelopment's opponents, said in his arguments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2011
A third person involved in a car accident at this year's All Good Music Festival has sued the organizers, Maryland-based Walther Productions. The jam band festival, which takes place in July in West Virginia, was accused of negligence in a pair of lawsuits filed earlier this month by two other victims, a young woman who was injured and the father of a young woman who died as a result of the car accident. In an interview last week, an attorney for the organizers defended the festival's safety record.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 20, 2010
Charles Casey, a former pastor who used to live in Maryland, is suing Best Buy and its Geek Squad computer repair service for allegedly making negligent repairs on his computer, which caused it to shock him severely as soon as he plugged his printer into it, according to a federal lawsuit filed yesterday in Maryland. Casey, who lived in Cockeysville, Md., but now lives in Florida with his wife, said in the lawsuit that as soon as he plugged it in, he suffered "a severe electric shock that ran through his body, with tingling in his right hand up to his shoulder, across his tongue and down his left arm. " Casey had presented his computer for repair in early September 2007 to the Geek Squad at the Best Buy in the 1700 block of York Road in Timonium, the lawsuit states.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2010
AT&T customers in Maryland who connect to the Internet with smart phones are being taxed illegally, a class action lawsuit filed Friday alleges. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court by a Baltimore law firm led by trial lawyer William H. Murphy Jr., says those Maryland customers have been improperly billed a 6 percent monthly state tax and a monthly local communications tax. The lawsuit is seeking refunds and contends that total damages could exceed tens of millions of dollars.
SPORTS
By ASSOCAITED PRESS | September 13, 2007
NEW YORK -- Knicks guard Stephon Marbury testified yesterday in the case of a fired team executive who has accused coach Isiah Thomas of sexual harassment, calling the lawsuit absurd while downplaying an encounter with a drunken intern. After hearing about the lawsuit brought by Anucha Browne Sanders, "I laughed," Marbury said in U.S. District Court. "It was more of a joke than anything." Browne Sanders says she is owed her vice president position back and at least $10 million for enduring a sexually harassing workplace for five years.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
A Howard County high school teacher who successfully sued the school system for race discrimination several years ago filed a third lawsuit against the system Sept. 24 in a bid to address matters not covered in a pending lawsuit that alleges retaliation. "The [Sept. 24] lawsuit was filed to reserve my right to be able to file suits at a later date," said Michelle Maupin, who in July 2007 was awarded more than $200,000 in compensatory and punitive damages by a jury in a racial discrimination suit she filed while teaching at Centennial High School in Ellicott City.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
Lawyers representing the NCAA have filed a brief supporting the dismissal of a lawsuit that Ravens linebacker Michael McAdoo filed after the NCAA declared him ineligible for academic fraud and impermissible benefits while he was at the University of North Carolina. This, according to a report from The Charlotte Observer . After he was suspended indefinitely, McAdoo sued the NCAA, the university and UNC chancellor Holden Thorp in July 2011. The lawsuit was dismissed in November, but McAdoo appealed to the North Carolina Court of Appeals.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
A U.S. District Court judge on Wednesday upheld many of the claims in Terps guard Dez Wells' lawsuit against Xavier, which expelled him in 2012 after the then-Musketeers freshman star was accused of sexual assault. Judge Arthur Spiegel, according to media reports, dismissed a request by Wells to explore the decision of the school's conduct board to expel him, saying the statute of limitations had passed. He also threw out specific charges against the university president, the Rev. Michael Graham.
NEWS
March 31, 2012
In 1776, there were an estimated 2.5 million folks living in the New Colonies. Today, there are 311 million individuals who must be included when we consider their needs and make laws. How is it that the Baltimore Sun editorial staff, the media, our politicians, experts and even the president rarely, if ever, addresses this profound condition? Population growth and its problems should be the first factor in any national logistics planning. Furthermore, do we have confidence that the framers of the Constitution could see into the future?
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