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March 31, 2010
The Archdiocese of Baltimore is right to file this lawsuit against the ordinance regulating pregnancy counseling centers ("Church: Clinic signs are unlawful," March 30). I understand Planned Parenthood, which is one of the largest abortion mills in the country, requested then-City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake to sponsor this bill. Why should Planned Parenthood set the standards of what a pregnancy counseling center is? Planned Parenthood was against any provisions in this law that would regulate them.
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NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2014
It wasn't long after Ashley Overbey won approval for a $63,000 settlement from Baltimore's government that anonymous critics began their assault against her on the Internet. Commenting on news accounts of the settlement - which ended her lawsuit alleging police brutality - they accused the 27-year-old of initiating her arrest to get a big payout. She responded, defending herself and recounting details of the incident - a move that led the city to withhold $31,500 from Overbey's payout this week.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2012
A division of the Baltimore-based Cordish Cos. has been named as a co-defendant in a lawsuit alleging discriminatory practices at The Maker's Mark Bourbon House and Lounge, a tenant at Cordish's Fourth Street Live! property in Louisville, Ky. The lawsuit, filed Wednesday, alleges that the lounge's employees "demanded to know the ratio of 'black people' to 'white people'" who were expected to attend a party, then denied entrance to every black person who showed up. Andre Mulligan, the plaintiff in the lawsuit, is suing Louisville Bourbon LLC (doing business as Maker's Mark Bourbon House and Lounge)
NEWS
By Mark Puente and Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
As Baltimore Police Department officials prepare for a Department of Justice probe into allegations of brutality, leaders of the local police union criticized the outside scrutiny and said it could make city streets less safe. A host of reforms, along with a strategic plan unveiled last year, shows the department is serious about improving its relationship with the community, Fraternal Order of Police President Robert Cherry said Monday. The new federal scrutinty could make city officers fearful of being second-guessed and lead to ineffective policing, he added.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | February 27, 2011
Never mix friendship and money. Stanford Rothschild did, in large quantities. He ended up losing both, according to a lawsuit filed last week that virtually wails betrayal. The longtime Baltimore money manager became estranged from one of his best friends and his biggest customer — a tie torn apart by friction over Rothschild's wife and the defection by his own employees and accountant, alleges a civil complaint filed in Baltimore City Circuit Court. Bosom pal Manuel Dupkin worked behind the scenes to withdraw his fortune from Rothschild's firm and set up Rothschild employees in a new company that would manage the money, the complaint said.
NEWS
February 10, 2013
Now that Comptroller Joan M. Pratt's lawsuit has been officially deemed frivolous and dismissed by Judge Pamela White "with prejudice" ("Pratt's suit over phone system is dismissed," Feb. 7), one major question remains. How much taxpayer money and city employee time and energy has been wasted with months and months of this shameless politicking? Comptroller Pratt alone brought the lawsuit alleging misuse of city funds, and Comptroller Pratt alone should be held accountable for any and all legal costs (her own misuse of funds)
BUSINESS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
An Annapolis medical practice will pay $22,500 to a former employee who claimed she was discriminated against because she was pregnant. Officials for Annapolis Internal Medicine said Tuesday they agreed to the payment to settle a lawsuit filed last year by the U.S. Equal Opportunity Commission on behalf of the employee. Jonathan P. Kagan, an attorney for Annapolis Internal Medicine, said the doctors decided to settle rather than bear the expense of defending it at trial. The doctors deny any wrongdoing, he said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge has ruled that a lawsuit over mold in one of the ritzy Harborview condos can proceed to trial. Paul C. Clark, who bought a penthouse at the Inner Harbor complex for more than $1.1 million in 2009, is suing Zalco Realty and the 100 Harborview Drive Council of Unit Owners for $5 million. He contends that the defendants knew of water and mold problems before his purchase but issued him a "resale certification" that stated they were aware of no building or health code violations.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
A Baltimore judge on Wednesday rejected an attempt by city officials to dismiss a multimillion lawsuit filed by the former developers of the so-called "Superblock. " "We're glad this ruling allows us to move this project forward," said Jason St. John, an attorney representing Lexington Square Partners, which is demanding more than $50 million after Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake canceled their exclusive rights to the west-side property. "We need to stop the delays and move this project forward," St. John said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Three restaurant workers at Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport have filed a collective action lawsuit that accuses the operator of five airport restaurants of failing to pay minimum and overtime wages. The federal lawsuit, filed Oct. 11 in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, alleged Aero Service Group Inc. had a policy of paying hourly workers two separate paychecks for the same pay period and failing to pay overtime for more than 40 hours worked in a week.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
While hospitalized with a fractured ankle and broken jaw, John Bonkowski reached for his smartphone to find details about the man who beat him outside a parking garage near the Inner Harbor. He typed "Officer Michael McSpadden" into Google. The results stunned Bonkowski. He found references showing that the longtime Baltimore officer had been accused in three separate civil lawsuits: of kicking and stomping a woman, of breaking a man's wrist and of beating a man unconscious with a police baton.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
A federal appeals court ruled Thursday that a lawsuit brought against the Baltimore Police Department and three officers by a man who says he was wrongfully convicted of murder in a 1987 killing can proceed. James Owens was charged in the robbery, rape and murder of 24-year-old phone company employee and college student Colleen Williar in her Southeast Baltimore home. According to court records, Owens came under suspicion when a neighbor of Williar's, James Thompson, told police he found a knife outside Williar's apartment and retrieved it on behalf of Owens, a friend.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
A South Baltimore man filed a lawsuit Monday against a city police officer, accusing the officer of punching him repeatedly during a June arrest — an incident that was captured on video. Kollin Truss and Officer Vincent E. Cosom argued a few moments before the arrest, but a woman with Truss had separated the pair, and Truss was apparently walking away from police when they decided to make an arrest. "This attack was completely unprovoked and served no legitimate law enforcement purpose," Truss' attorneys, Ivan J. Bates and Tony N. Garcia, wrote in a complaint filed in Baltimore Circuit Court.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 27, 2014
A Washington-area trail users' group and a pair of environmental advocates have filed suit to block the Purple Line , contending the $2.4 billion light-rail project in the DC suburbs threatens to harm two species of endangered crustaceans that live in the creek the transit line would cross. The Friends of the Capital Crescent Trail and John M. Fitzgerald and Christine Real de Azua of Chevy Chase asked the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia Tuesday to overturn clearance given the project earlier this year by the Federal Transit Administration and require federal agencies to explore alternate routes for the rail line.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Longshoremen who went on strike last year at the port of Baltimore claim they are not liable for related losses sustained by their employers, in part because a coastwide labor contract banning such strikes does not apply to them. The claim was made in a federal court filing by Jennifer Stair, an attorney for the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333. The dockworkers union was sued last month by port employers for $3.86 million in damages — the amount arbitrator M. David Vaughn determined the employers lost during the union's three-day strike in October.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. confirmed Thursday that it has settled a lawsuit brought by residents of an East Baltimore rowhouse partially destroyed in a gas explosion and the family of an 8-year-old boy who was killed in the blast. The family of Troy Douglas, the boy who was killed, and Henry Gaither and Danelle White, who lived in the house in the 400 block of N. Lakewood Ave., sued BGE in May over the explosion. The suit filed by Troy's family alleged that the company had failed to properly maintain its gas lines.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Harper Lee's leap into the headlines with a lawsuit against a New York literary agent is a remarkable change for the reclusive author, who wrote a great American novel a half-century ago and has hardly been heard from since. Another famous author/recluse, J.D. Salinger, popped up in a legal challenge in a few years ago, when he tried to halt publication of "60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye," an unauthorized sequel to his classic coming of age novel. A settlement of that lawsuit -- coming after Salinger died -- limited the sale of the book in the U.S. and Canada.  Now Lee, author of "To Kill a Mockingbird, " has accused her former agent, Samuel Pinkus, and others of trying to deprive her of royalties from the novel.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
A lawsuit challenging the use of pollution "trading" to clean up the Chesapeake Bay was thrown out Friday, removing another legal hurdle to a federally imposed plan to restore the ailing estuary's water quality. Judge Rudolph Contreras in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia granted a motion by the Environmental Protection Agency to dismiss the lawsuit brought against it by two environmental groups. The groups, Food & Water Watch and Friends of the Earth, had sued the EPA in October 2012, contending that a market-based cleanup program that is part of the agency's "pollution diet" for the bay violates the federal Clean Water Act and would undermine - rather than help - efforts to restore the Chesapeake.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
A Virginia mother has filed a $1 million suit against Trimper's Rides and Amusements in Ocean City claiming a ride left her young son with a traumatic brain injury. Raffinee McNeill, of Accomack County, filed the personal injury claim in U.S. District Court on July 23. According to the court filing, her son and his cousins were on the Hampton I, a ride geared toward youngsters that features miniature trucks and cars that travel in a circle, when an operator "abruptly" halted the ride to let another child off. At that time, McNeill claims, her son thought the ride was over and he also got out of his car. The operator resumed the ride and one of the cars hit her son, knocking him down and "fracturing his skull on the cement floor," according to the complaint.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Baltimore officials agreed Wednesday to settle two lawsuits involving alleged police misconduct, costing the city a combined $88,500. The city's spending panel, the Board of Estimates, approved a settlement for $62,000 after a group of men say they were falsely arrested and subject to an unwarranted use of force by a police officer inside a city parking garage in June 2012. The board also approved the settlement of a case for $26,500 involving a husband and wife and their friend who alleged that they were wrongly arrested around 1:30 a.m. on Oct. 27, 2012 while a Baltimore club was closing.
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