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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Movie Critic | September 14, 1990
He's back and, boy, do we need him now.He's T.E. Lawrence, scourge of the desert, who is returning to the epic screen at the Senator in the form of 70-millimeter print of David Lean's 1962 classic, "Lawrence of Arabia."According to Tom Kiefaber, the owner of the Senator, the original five-week run of "Lawrence" played to more than 20,000 patrons in the spring of last year. On its last night, a Tuesday, more than 200 people were turned away from the 900-seat theater on York Road."Since then," Kiefaber says, "I've been barraged with calls requesting its return.
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By Susan King and Susan King,Los Angeles Times | December 5, 2008
Filmmaker Baz Luhrmann calls them "banquets of cinema," visual and narrative feasts that offer audiences drama, romance, comedy and that sweeping feeling of being transported to another world. In other words: an epic. Creating an epic is not for the faint of heart or those with limited ambition, which is why the audacious Luhrmann - who reconceived the movie musical with Moulin Rouge! and the Shakespearean tragedy with Romeo + Juliet - deliberately aimed his latest film, Australia, to be on a, well, epic scale.
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By Susan King and Susan King,Los Angeles Times | December 5, 2008
Filmmaker Baz Luhrmann calls them "banquets of cinema," visual and narrative feasts that offer audiences drama, romance, comedy and that sweeping feeling of being transported to another world. In other words: an epic. Creating an epic is not for the faint of heart or those with limited ambition, which is why the audacious Luhrmann - who reconceived the movie musical with Moulin Rouge! and the Shakespearean tragedy with Romeo + Juliet - deliberately aimed his latest film, Australia, to be on a, well, epic scale.
NEWS
November 25, 2007
HOLIDAY KENNEDY KRIEGER'S FESTIVAL OF TREES -- 10 a.m.-6 p.m. today. Maryland State Fairgrounds, 2200 York Road, Timonium. $5-$10; free for children 4 and younger. 443-923-7300 or festivaloftrees.kennedykriege r.org. This is the last day of the annual fundraiser for the Kennedy Krieger Institute, which works to help children with developmental disabili ties. The holiday extravaganza includes live performances and many other events. On view are 500 decorated trees that will get you in the holiday spir it. Get a start on your holiday shopping with 100 craft vendors.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 20, 2002
Movie fans have come to believe that when Robert A. Harris restores a film, he puts it in an audiovisual state of grace that no future ugliness can penetrate. And why not? The work Harris did with Jim Painten on David Lean's Lawrence of Arabia set new marks for classic-film reconstruction and presentation. And Harris and his current partner, James C. Katz, have met that standard again and again, with Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus, George Cukor's My Fair Lady and Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo and Rear Window.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,Sun Movie Critic | September 22, 2002
At the end of December 1962, roughly three weeks after Lawrence of Arabia had its premiere, the screenwriter, Robert Bolt, wrote the director, David Lean, that a Muslim psychoanalyst friend of his had called him up and said, "it was the first picture he has seen in which a Muslim people were accorded absolutely equal status with the whites, being neither sentimentalized nor belittled. On the other hand, you know, I don't think the Zionists could say we'd made a pro-Arab picture. ... It's when you start truckling to this or that expectation that you give offense."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 23, 2003
Peter O'Toole is a magnificent, unique actor who blends the naked emotion of the boldest psycho-dramatists with the dash and magnetism of gallant matinee idols. He's too big a bird to be pigeonholed, and not only because of his lean, tall, flowing presence. Critics, audiences and studio heads alike tend to typecast leading men as romantic figures, character actors or stage-trained class acts, but O'Toole defies categories, drawing on huge reservoirs of charisma, insight and eloquence in varying combinations every time out. He's also the only figure at the Academy Awards whose many nominations have all come in recognition of great, inimitable characterizations rather than popularity or staying power.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 5, 1991
LONDON -- The actors Peter O'Toole, Sir Alec Guinness, Sarah Miles, Tom Courtenay and Omar Sharif were among the 800 people who gathered Thursday at St. Paul's Cathedral to honor Sir David Lean, the director of films including "Lawrence of Arabia," "The Bridge on the River Kwai," "Dr. HD," "Brief Encounter" and "A Passage to India." Lean died in April at the age of 83.The Rev. Eric Evans, dean of St. Paul's, echoed the words spoken of Lawrence of Arabia in that same cathedral in Lean's film, calling the director "one of the most extraordinary men of our age and our generation."
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | April 17, 1991
MENTION THE name of David Lean, and the word that comes immediately to mind is epic. Lean, British-born film director who died yesterday at the age of 83, was responsible for films like ''Bridge on the River Kwai'' (1957), ''Lawrence of Arabia'' (1962), ''Dr. HD (1965), ''Ryan's Daughter'' (1970) and, most recently, ''Passage to India'' (1984).His movies won 28 Academy Awards, including two for Best Director for "Lawrence" and "Kwai." ''Lawrence" won seven.Lean began his career doing smaller films.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 29, 2000
OK, so "Blair Witch 2" was a bust, both commercially and critically. Despite that, the local film community had a banner year in 2000. And that goes both for people watching and people making movies. Certainly the highlight of the year was April's second annual Maryland Film Festival, which dismissed any thoughts of a sophomore slump with a schedule that, if anything, highlighted an even greater variety of films than 1999's inaugural effort. With a slate that included everything from local underground filmmakers to "Lawrence of Arabia," from magic lantern shows to the legendary Kuchar Brothers, there were plenty of reasons to pitch a tent at the Charles and spend an entire weekend in front of a movie screen.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 27, 2007
Lawrence of Arabia (1962) attracts followers so fanatical that the chance to see it in 70 mm would draw them to a theater every day for a month of Sundays. Now they have a chance to see it in 70 mm every Sunday in a month, starting this weekend through Sept. 2, at the AFI Silver in Silver Spring. Especially in the days since Titanic, any film can be called an epic if the producers pour enough money and special effects into it. But Lawrence of Arabia comes from an era when epics boasted men and women of vision and appetite and the adventure of committing them to celluloid-filled theaters with a wind-storm of fresh air, not the whiff of the computer room.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 23, 2003
Peter O'Toole is a magnificent, unique actor who blends the naked emotion of the boldest psycho-dramatists with the dash and magnetism of gallant matinee idols. He's too big a bird to be pigeonholed, and not only because of his lean, tall, flowing presence. Critics, audiences and studio heads alike tend to typecast leading men as romantic figures, character actors or stage-trained class acts, but O'Toole defies categories, drawing on huge reservoirs of charisma, insight and eloquence in varying combinations every time out. He's also the only figure at the Academy Awards whose many nominations have all come in recognition of great, inimitable characterizations rather than popularity or staying power.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 1, 2002
Andre de Toth, who died last Sunday of an aneurysm at the age of 89, led three Hollywood lives. He's notorious as the one-eyed director of the best 3-D movie, 1953's House of Wax. (The next year he made a less successful 3-D movie, The Stranger Wore a Gun.) But he was also the auteur behind cult films like None Shall Escape (1944) and Crime Wave (1954), and the uncredited second-unit director on two wildly different epics, Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and Superman (1978). Combined, his 1994 memoir Fragments and his 1996 interview book, De Toth on De Toth cover all that - as well as his youth and early film career in Hungary, his stint making Italian spectacles like Morgan the Pirate (1961)
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,Sun Movie Critic | September 22, 2002
At the end of December 1962, roughly three weeks after Lawrence of Arabia had its premiere, the screenwriter, Robert Bolt, wrote the director, David Lean, that a Muslim psychoanalyst friend of his had called him up and said, "it was the first picture he has seen in which a Muslim people were accorded absolutely equal status with the whites, being neither sentimentalized nor belittled. On the other hand, you know, I don't think the Zionists could say we'd made a pro-Arab picture. ... It's when you start truckling to this or that expectation that you give offense."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 20, 2002
Movie fans have come to believe that when Robert A. Harris restores a film, he puts it in an audiovisual state of grace that no future ugliness can penetrate. And why not? The work Harris did with Jim Painten on David Lean's Lawrence of Arabia set new marks for classic-film reconstruction and presentation. And Harris and his current partner, James C. Katz, have met that standard again and again, with Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus, George Cukor's My Fair Lady and Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo and Rear Window.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 29, 2000
OK, so "Blair Witch 2" was a bust, both commercially and critically. Despite that, the local film community had a banner year in 2000. And that goes both for people watching and people making movies. Certainly the highlight of the year was April's second annual Maryland Film Festival, which dismissed any thoughts of a sophomore slump with a schedule that, if anything, highlighted an even greater variety of films than 1999's inaugural effort. With a slate that included everything from local underground filmmakers to "Lawrence of Arabia," from magic lantern shows to the legendary Kuchar Brothers, there were plenty of reasons to pitch a tent at the Charles and spend an entire weekend in front of a movie screen.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 27, 2007
Lawrence of Arabia (1962) attracts followers so fanatical that the chance to see it in 70 mm would draw them to a theater every day for a month of Sundays. Now they have a chance to see it in 70 mm every Sunday in a month, starting this weekend through Sept. 2, at the AFI Silver in Silver Spring. Especially in the days since Titanic, any film can be called an epic if the producers pour enough money and special effects into it. But Lawrence of Arabia comes from an era when epics boasted men and women of vision and appetite and the adventure of committing them to celluloid-filled theaters with a wind-storm of fresh air, not the whiff of the computer room.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 1, 2002
Andre de Toth, who died last Sunday of an aneurysm at the age of 89, led three Hollywood lives. He's notorious as the one-eyed director of the best 3-D movie, 1953's House of Wax. (The next year he made a less successful 3-D movie, The Stranger Wore a Gun.) But he was also the auteur behind cult films like None Shall Escape (1944) and Crime Wave (1954), and the uncredited second-unit director on two wildly different epics, Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and Superman (1978). Combined, his 1994 memoir Fragments and his 1996 interview book, De Toth on De Toth cover all that - as well as his youth and early film career in Hungary, his stint making Italian spectacles like Morgan the Pirate (1961)
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 22, 1992
Los Angeles -- The Force needs to be with George Lucas this time.The creator of "Star Wars" is producing and writing the most ambitious series of the television season. The title for the one-hour show: "The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles."Don't let the blockbuster movie reference fool you: It's no sure hit, and Mr. Lucas knows it.When the young Indy arrives on ABC in late February or early March, he will bear little resemblance to the action hero played by Harrison Ford. Two actors are portraying Indy as a boy and a teen-ager; a third is playing him as a 93-year-old who reminisces about the earlier times.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 5, 1991
LONDON -- The actors Peter O'Toole, Sir Alec Guinness, Sarah Miles, Tom Courtenay and Omar Sharif were among the 800 people who gathered Thursday at St. Paul's Cathedral to honor Sir David Lean, the director of films including "Lawrence of Arabia," "The Bridge on the River Kwai," "Dr. HD," "Brief Encounter" and "A Passage to India." Lean died in April at the age of 83.The Rev. Eric Evans, dean of St. Paul's, echoed the words spoken of Lawrence of Arabia in that same cathedral in Lean's film, calling the director "one of the most extraordinary men of our age and our generation."
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