Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLawrence Livermore National Laboratory
IN THE NEWS

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 12, 1994
Dramatically illustrating the security problems posed by the rapid growth of the Internet computer network, one of the nation's three nuclear weapons labs confirmed yesterday that computer hackers were using its computers to store and distribute hard-core pornography.Embarrassed officials at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif., which conducts a great deal of classified research and has highly sophisticated security procedures, said the incident was among the most serious breaches of computer security ever at the lab east of San Francisco.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 5, 1994
LIVERMORE, Calif. -- The "Woodpecker Project" was a great success.The CIA says so and invited a team of scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and their families to a brass-band ceremony at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va., where the Woodpeckers received the Intelligence Community Seal Medallion.So what was Project Woodpecker?Don't ask. It's a state secret."Here we have this great recognition, but we can't say anything about it," said Ellen Raber, who started up the project in 1985 and gave it its name.
NEWS
By Dan Stober and Dan Stober,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 7, 1993
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are trying to crack the 65-million-year-old mystery of a dinosaur egg that never hatched.Using sophisticated X-ray equipment more often aimed at bomb parts than ancient eggs, they are peering inside the fossilized egg that had been buried in China for millions of years.Locked up in this stone, which is not much larger than a tall can of beer, is an embryo, a tiny dinosaur that grew for a while before dying inside its shell.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | June 7, 1993
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are trying to crack the 65 million-year-old mystery of a dinosaur egg that never hatched.Using sophisticated X-ray equipment more often aimed at bomb parts than ancient eggs, they are peering inside the fossilized egg that had been buried in China for millions of years.Locked up in this stone, which is not much larger than a tall can of beer, is an embryo, a tiny dinosaur that grew for a while before dying inside its shell.
NEWS
August 3, 2000
Solomon Halberstam, 92, the grand rabbi who led the Bobov sect of Orthodox Hasidic Jews out of Europe after World War II and oversaw its rebirth, gaining tens of thousands of followers, died yesterday in New York. Thousands of mourners had started gathering after Mr. Halberstam was taken to a hospital late Tuesday with internal bleeding. Mr. Halberstam, a descendant of one of the first Hasidic leaders in Europe, survived the purge of Jews by the Nazis, along with his son, Naftali. The rest of his family was killed, including his father, his youngest brother and three brothers-in-law.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 28, 1992
The federal government, which battled for decades to keep the workings of the hydrogen bomb secret, is beginning to declassify some of the most sensitive aspects of its design and to let American scientists publish them in scientific literature.The reason for this reversal is not internal policy considerations, the end of the cold war or the collapse of the Soviet Union as a military threat. Rather it is foreign competition.Scientists in Japan, Germany, Spain and Italy, striving to harness the power of tiny, repeated hydrogen-bomb-like blasts for the generation of electrical energy, have published the "secrets" for years.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 21, 1993
Sudden, stunning flashes of brilliance by three nearby stars have led scientists to conclude they have seen the first direct evidence of one form of dark matter, the mysterious and until now unseen phenomenon that is believed to account for 90 percent or more of all mass in the universe.Two teams of scientists, one American and Australian and the other French, reported yesterday at conferences in Italy that three stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud briefly grew brighter than usual, almost certainly because gravity from dark matter bent the star's light rays into focus on Earth.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Energy Department has ordered a full review of security at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory after discovering security lapses that officials called "unacceptable." Federal officials ordered the review of the laboratory in Northern California on Friday after learning that the loss of an electronic access badge had gone unreported to senior managers for six weeks. The badge could help gain access to 3,000 offices at the facility, some containing classified material.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 31, 1999
The director of an installation intended to house the world's most powerful lasers has resigned his post after a flurry of anonymous faxes to officials at his California laboratory and the Department of Energy in Washington disclosed that he lacked a doctoral degree.E. Michael Campbell, associate director for lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif., left his position Friday but remains an employee of the laboratory on leave, a laboratory spokesman said. Campbell is recognized as one of the world's leading experts in ultra-high-energy lasers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 5, 2000
The safest hamburger might be a well-flipped hamburger, a new study from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California suggests. Government guidelines suggest cooking ground beef thoroughly to kill bacteria that can cause salmonella and other infections. But some food safety experts have wondered how best to do that without raising levels of amines, chemicals that have been linked to cancer in animals. "These compounds are formed at high temperatures, so the more you cook something the more of these amines you get," said Mark Knize, an analytical chemist who took part in the study.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.