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By Steven Rea and Steven Rea,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | March 6, 1992
Last weekend, Lawrence Kasdan flew into Philadelphia from Paris, where he'd attended the French opening of "Grand Canyon." Immediately before that, he was in Berlin, where his ensemble drama about angst and anxiety among a disparate group of Los Angelenos won the Berlin International Film Festival's top prize, the Golden Bear."
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 24, 1999
"Big Chill" director Lawrence Kasdan has come up with yet another self-consciously witty ensemble comedy featuring a memorable gaggle of misfits in "Mumford." But unlike "Grand Canyon," his superlative 1991 comedy-drama of Los Angeles manners, "Mumford" goes the Frank Capra route, undermining the movie's more eccentric charms.The movie's title derives both from the town in which it is set and from a psychologist who works there. Played by Loren Dean with a never-changing passive smile, Mumford has recently arrived and set up shop on the town's pretty main street.
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By Mariam Brillantes and Mariam Brillantes,Entertainment News Service | January 12, 1992
Los Angeles -- The holiday season is traditionally a time when studios release their fluff offerings: fantasy and adventure films, action-oriented extravaganzas, wholesome family entertainment and feel-good love stories.Maybe that's why director Lawrence Kasdan delayed the release of "Grand Canyon," a film about real life and what ultimately gives it meaning and value.In this highly anticipated new ensemble piece -- which opens nationally on Friday -- Mr. Kasdan takes an intimate look at the harsh realities of contemporary urban society.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 20, 1998
Imagine Sherlock Holmes as a 20th-century man -- his addiction to cocaine replaced with a predilection for amphetamines and Tab, his precious violin transformed into a Stratocaster -- and you begin to get an idea of Daryl Zero, the puckish, agoraphobic private detective played by Bill Pullman in "Zero Effect."Admirers of Arthur Conan Doyle are likely to find Jake Kasdan's directorial debut a clever contemporizing riff on Holmes, replete with a long-suffering Watson -- in this case a harried executive assistant played with a sardonic straight face by Ben Stiller.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 24, 1999
"Big Chill" director Lawrence Kasdan has come up with yet another self-consciously witty ensemble comedy featuring a memorable gaggle of misfits in "Mumford." But unlike "Grand Canyon," his superlative 1991 comedy-drama of Los Angeles manners, "Mumford" goes the Frank Capra route, undermining the movie's more eccentric charms.The movie's title derives both from the town in which it is set and from a psychologist who works there. Played by Loren Dean with a never-changing passive smile, Mumford has recently arrived and set up shop on the town's pretty main street.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1992
DIRECTOR-writer Lawrence Kasdan is maturing. His newest film, ''Grand Canyon,'' is proof of that. When he did ''The Big Chill,'' he was 34 and still basking in the afterglow of the '60s.In the eight years since then, he has become more aware of the larger society, and in this instance, he does not like what he sees.He is not making comment on American society. He is simply observing it, and in the end, he offers some hope that we can make our way out of this mess.It's a long film, but then what film today is not?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | May 5, 1995
Meg Ryan seems to play the same role in almost all her movies, the girl-next-door who finds unexpected love, but her fans don't seem to mind if the chemistry works. And it works, really works, in the charming romantic comedy "French Kiss."Breezier than "When Harry Met Sally . . . " and a lot sassier than the saccharine "Sleepless in Seattle," prime examples of the Meg Ryan subgenre, "French Kiss" sustains a light touch and still manages to be touching.Aglow with energy, Ryan gives her character both innocence and brains.
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By Stephen Wigler THEATER The love of money | January 18, 1992
MUSICPianist to perform LisztDaniel Blumenthal ranks among the best French pianists, and his Liszt playing is particularly prized. Tomorrow at 3 p.m. he will join the Maryland Symphony Orchestra and its music director, Barry Tuckwell, in works by that composer and by George Gershwin. The concert will take place in Hagerstown's Maryland Theater (21 S. Potomac St.) Call (301) 790-2000 for details.Moliere's comedy classic, "The Miser," with a new translation by Albert Bermel, is currently on stage at the Vagabond Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter SO:.Sun Film Critic | January 17, 1992
Any movie calling itself "Grand Canyon" ought to be pretty deep, or it's going to get itself laughed off the screen.Pardon the noise, but ha, ha, ha.Deep? You could fill it with water and stand in it for an hour and go home with dry socks. Written and directed by Lawrence Kasdan as a meditation on random violence and the breakdown of social convention, it lacks the vigor or the guts to be of any use to anyone.Kasdan zeroes in on a group of Los Angelinos who must confront urban disruption on a daily basis and come to terms with it. Mostly, the coming to terms involves endless stilted dialogue of the touchy-feely variety and tepidly ironic interactions, against the fabric of the disintegrating city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick | July 16, 1993
THE BODYGUARD(Warner, $99.99, rated R, 1992)Billy Crystal's Fernando character said, "It is better to look good than to feel good." Although it gets a great laugh, one has the sense watching "The Bodyguard" that it is a truism amongHollywood types, at least with the producers of this shallow celluloid sleight-of-hand.There's only the tiniest hint of a story here -- and even less plot. Essentially, the audience is supposed to feel satisfied that they are able to watch two pretty celebrities, Kevin Costner and Whitney Houston, wander around in the stylish and glitzy world of stardom, while enjoying a soundtrack featuring new songs by Ms. Houston.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | May 5, 1995
Meg Ryan seems to play the same role in almost all her movies, the girl-next-door who finds unexpected love, but her fans don't seem to mind if the chemistry works. And it works, really works, in the charming romantic comedy "French Kiss."Breezier than "When Harry Met Sally . . . " and a lot sassier than the saccharine "Sleepless in Seattle," prime examples of the Meg Ryan subgenre, "French Kiss" sustains a light touch and still manages to be touching.Aglow with energy, Ryan gives her character both innocence and brains.
FEATURES
By David Kronke and David Kronke,Special to The Sun | June 24, 1994
Los Angeles -- Megastar, sex symbol, Oscar-winning director -- phooey. First and foremost Kevin Costner is a movie fan."I like Westerns too much to be in a [crummy] one," he declares, just prior to the release of "Wyatt Earp," his third in the genre (following "Silverado" and "Dances With Wolves").Epics, too, are Mr. Costner's forte -- he has now starred in three movies that run more than three hours in length ("Dances," "JFK" and "Earp"), more than probably any other Hollywood star working today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick | July 16, 1993
THE BODYGUARD(Warner, $99.99, rated R, 1992)Billy Crystal's Fernando character said, "It is better to look good than to feel good." Although it gets a great laugh, one has the sense watching "The Bodyguard" that it is a truism amongHollywood types, at least with the producers of this shallow celluloid sleight-of-hand.There's only the tiniest hint of a story here -- and even less plot. Essentially, the audience is supposed to feel satisfied that they are able to watch two pretty celebrities, Kevin Costner and Whitney Houston, wander around in the stylish and glitzy world of stardom, while enjoying a soundtrack featuring new songs by Ms. Houston.
FEATURES
By Steven Rea and Steven Rea,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | March 6, 1992
Last weekend, Lawrence Kasdan flew into Philadelphia from Paris, where he'd attended the French opening of "Grand Canyon." Immediately before that, he was in Berlin, where his ensemble drama about angst and anxiety among a disparate group of Los Angelenos won the Berlin International Film Festival's top prize, the Golden Bear."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler THEATER The love of money | January 18, 1992
MUSICPianist to perform LisztDaniel Blumenthal ranks among the best French pianists, and his Liszt playing is particularly prized. Tomorrow at 3 p.m. he will join the Maryland Symphony Orchestra and its music director, Barry Tuckwell, in works by that composer and by George Gershwin. The concert will take place in Hagerstown's Maryland Theater (21 S. Potomac St.) Call (301) 790-2000 for details.Moliere's comedy classic, "The Miser," with a new translation by Albert Bermel, is currently on stage at the Vagabond Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter SO:.Sun Film Critic | January 17, 1992
Any movie calling itself "Grand Canyon" ought to be pretty deep, or it's going to get itself laughed off the screen.Pardon the noise, but ha, ha, ha.Deep? You could fill it with water and stand in it for an hour and go home with dry socks. Written and directed by Lawrence Kasdan as a meditation on random violence and the breakdown of social convention, it lacks the vigor or the guts to be of any use to anyone.Kasdan zeroes in on a group of Los Angelinos who must confront urban disruption on a daily basis and come to terms with it. Mostly, the coming to terms involves endless stilted dialogue of the touchy-feely variety and tepidly ironic interactions, against the fabric of the disintegrating city.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 20, 1998
Imagine Sherlock Holmes as a 20th-century man -- his addiction to cocaine replaced with a predilection for amphetamines and Tab, his precious violin transformed into a Stratocaster -- and you begin to get an idea of Daryl Zero, the puckish, agoraphobic private detective played by Bill Pullman in "Zero Effect."Admirers of Arthur Conan Doyle are likely to find Jake Kasdan's directorial debut a clever contemporizing riff on Holmes, replete with a long-suffering Watson -- in this case a harried executive assistant played with a sardonic straight face by Ben Stiller.
FEATURES
By David Kronke and David Kronke,Special to The Sun | June 24, 1994
Los Angeles -- Megastar, sex symbol, Oscar-winning director -- phooey. First and foremost Kevin Costner is a movie fan."I like Westerns too much to be in a [crummy] one," he declares, just prior to the release of "Wyatt Earp," his third in the genre (following "Silverado" and "Dances With Wolves").Epics, too, are Mr. Costner's forte -- he has now starred in three movies that run more than three hours in length ("Dances," "JFK" and "Earp"), more than probably any other Hollywood star working today.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1992
DIRECTOR-writer Lawrence Kasdan is maturing. His newest film, ''Grand Canyon,'' is proof of that. When he did ''The Big Chill,'' he was 34 and still basking in the afterglow of the '60s.In the eight years since then, he has become more aware of the larger society, and in this instance, he does not like what he sees.He is not making comment on American society. He is simply observing it, and in the end, he offers some hope that we can make our way out of this mess.It's a long film, but then what film today is not?
FEATURES
By Mariam Brillantes and Mariam Brillantes,Entertainment News Service | January 12, 1992
Los Angeles -- The holiday season is traditionally a time when studios release their fluff offerings: fantasy and adventure films, action-oriented extravaganzas, wholesome family entertainment and feel-good love stories.Maybe that's why director Lawrence Kasdan delayed the release of "Grand Canyon," a film about real life and what ultimately gives it meaning and value.In this highly anticipated new ensemble piece -- which opens nationally on Friday -- Mr. Kasdan takes an intimate look at the harsh realities of contemporary urban society.
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