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By LAURA VOZZELLA | March 5, 2006
Lawrence Bell III has kept a low profile in Baltimore since 1999, when the mayoral front-runner saw his campaign collapse in a swirl of overdue condo fees, a campaign-sponsored Saks spending spree, and fake white supremacist literature. So low, in fact, that he took "Best Disappearing Act" in City Paper's Best of Baltimore 2000 issue. The paper tried to run down rumors that he was in Atlanta, College Park and elsewhere, but only ran into dead ends. Well, the search is over. Bell is back in Baltimore (assuming he ever left)
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NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | July 18, 2006
For a long time after Baltimore's 1999 mayoral race ended, people wondered what happened to Lawrence A. Bell III. The former City Council president entered the campaign as a frontrunner, then lost the Democratic primary to Martin O'Malley after a series of high-profile missteps. Shortly after his defeat, Bell seemingly disappeared. Rumors placed him in Atlanta, maybe hosting a radio show, but they were never confirmed. Now Bell is plotting his political comeback. He's running for the West Baltimore state Senate seat being vacated by retiring Democratic incumbent Sen. Ralph M. Hughes.
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NEWS
December 21, 1997
MIDWAY THROUGH his first term as the city's No. 2 elected official, City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III is engaged in a delicate juggling act. Narrowly elected in a four-way race in 1995, he seeks to broaden his base and make himself relevant on a council where most members are in the camp of his antagonist, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.So far, Mr. Bell is not succeeding.The recent votes on the controversial Inner Harbor East Wyndham hotel were a prime example. This was a perfect opportunity for Mr. Bell to stand up for the principle of legislative oversight of taxpayer-funded development projects and to cast himself as a viable alternative to Mr. Schmoke, a strong supporter of the hotel.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER AND JOSH MITCHELL and MICHAEL DRESSER AND JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTERS | July 4, 2006
Late entrants on ballots widen election field Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller will face a challenge from a conservative, anti-gambling former Air Force officer with the same surname - personally recruited by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to run against the powerful Democrat who had been a key ally in the governor's effort to legalize slots in Maryland. Ron Miller's filing yesterday as a Republican in Senate District 27 - spanning Calvert and Prince George's counties - came as procrastinators and late-deciding candidates for state office streamed to Annapolis to beat the deadline to get on the Sept.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 2, 1999
South Africa must learn to do without Nelson Mandela, and the United States without Bill Clinton.Cheer up. All that diplomatic to-ing and fro-ing to Belgrade must be for some purpose.Maryland, it turns out, built PSINet Stadium for a rock concert venue, where football may also be performed, in the off- season.Lawrence Bell for City Council president!Pub Date: 6/02/99
NEWS
By Dan Berger | March 5, 1999
Monica was so good on the talk show, they should promote her from the soaps to sitcom.If only other federal whistle-blowers were treated so considerately as L.R. Tripp.Keep the independent counsel! Every future president should get a Starr to investigate whatever the scoundrel is about to do next.All the inside people are for Lawrence Bell. Either they know something, or he does.Pub Date: 3/05/99
NEWS
August 18, 1991
1st District:John CainNicholas C. D'Adamo Jr.Perry Sfikas2nd District:Anthony J. AmbridgePeter BeilensonBeatrice Gaddy3rd District:Linda C. JaneyKevin O'KeeffeMartin O'Malley4th District:Lawrence BellSheila DixonAgnes Welch5th District:Vera P. HallIris G. ReevesRochelle Rikki Spector6th District:Arlene B. FisherEdward L. ReisingerMelvin L. Stukes
NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 30, 1999
There's not much point in a budget surplus that's not used for debt reduction.Maryland privatized juvenile prisons in 1992. Only now people are starting to wonder why.Everyone favors the current health care system except patients, physicians, employers and research and teaching hospitals.Turkey can kill Abdullah Ocalan. Most countries would. That's not the same as ending Kurdish rebellion.It's hard to play cops and robbers before the cops arrive, as they are learning in Kosovo.Lawrence Bell for president of the City Council!
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | December 13, 1994
On a blustery January day, just after Baltimore's homicide rate soared to a new record, a young city councilman called for the police commissioner to resign if the escalating violence did not end.Yesterday, almost two years after he became widely known for his crusade against crime, Councilman Lawrence A. Bell III announced his candidacy for council president.He delivered a tough speech on the need to "rescue our young and old from the pervasive fear of being victimized by crime." The 4th District councilman cited his legislative efforts to combat crime and promised to "continue this challenge to make Baltimore a safe community."
NEWS
March 13, 2004
On March 11, 2004, IRENE MAE SLEEMAN (nee Bell), of Baltimore, beloved wife of the late George Gilbert Sleeman, Sr.; dear mother of June Marie Jarman and William Russell Sleeman, and the late Barbara Lee Poole and George Gilbert Sleeman, Jr.; loving sister of Lawrence Bell and the late William Bell, Margaret Meyers, and Marie Campbell; cherished grandmother of six grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, and four great-great-grandchildren. The family will receive friends at the family owned and operated FINK FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 426 Crain Highway South (at Fifth Avenue)
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | March 5, 2006
Lawrence Bell III has kept a low profile in Baltimore since 1999, when the mayoral front-runner saw his campaign collapse in a swirl of overdue condo fees, a campaign-sponsored Saks spending spree, and fake white supremacist literature. So low, in fact, that he took "Best Disappearing Act" in City Paper's Best of Baltimore 2000 issue. The paper tried to run down rumors that he was in Atlanta, College Park and elsewhere, but only ran into dead ends. Well, the search is over. Bell is back in Baltimore (assuming he ever left)
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 7, 2005
Members of our illustrious Baltimore City Council made a big whoop recently when they sallied forth into an area in which they are all eminently qualified: foreign policy. Yes, late last month, only two days before Thanksgiving, the council weighed in on the war in Iraq, which they all think is a turkey. By unanimous vote, council members called on President Bush and members of Congress to "commence a humane, orderly, immediate and comprehensive withdrawal" of American troops from Iraq.
NEWS
March 13, 2004
On March 11, 2004, IRENE MAE SLEEMAN (nee Bell), of Baltimore, beloved wife of the late George Gilbert Sleeman, Sr.; dear mother of June Marie Jarman and William Russell Sleeman, and the late Barbara Lee Poole and George Gilbert Sleeman, Jr.; loving sister of Lawrence Bell and the late William Bell, Margaret Meyers, and Marie Campbell; cherished grandmother of six grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, and four great-great-grandchildren. The family will receive friends at the family owned and operated FINK FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 426 Crain Highway South (at Fifth Avenue)
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | September 9, 2001
WHEN last seen, in the fullness of his devotion to the democratic process, Julius Henson was trying to get Lawrence Bell elected mayor of Baltimore by shouting down his opponents. This time, he's more subtle. In the newly blossoming campaign for state's attorney, a job involving the prosecution of criminals, Henson's dug into the marital history, dating habits and patrimonial problems of Warren A. Brown. Before this, Brown was best known as one of the area's busiest (and best-paid) criminal defense attorneys.
NEWS
September 23, 1999
IN THE wake of the recent mayoral campaign, which saw Baltimore's predominantly African-American electorate propel white candidate Martin O'Malley to an overwhelming victory over two black candidates, many were left wondering if there's a leadership vacuum in the city's black community.After all, when Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke took office nearly 12 years ago, he was a potent symbol of black empowerment. Has the community given up on that idea?Mr. O'Malley can proudly point to a biracial coalition that helped elect him. But others wonder if the defeat of mayoral candidates Lawrence Bell and Carl Stokes -- who were encumbered by personal troubles -- isn't a dire sign of trouble in the ranks of black political leaders.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 16, 1999
AT 15 MINUTES before 10 o'clock Tuesday night, the night he all but got himself elected mayor of Baltimore, a soaking-wet Martin O'Malley stepped from a shower and did what every man in his situation wishes to do: He reached protectively for some precinct returns."
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | August 8, 1999
IN PURSUIT OF the mayoralty of Baltimore, in alleged pursuit of what he once called a more civilized, less racially divisive campaign than four years ago, Lawrence Bell allowed his supporters to commit an act of political vandalism last week.They ought to be ashamed of themselves, all of them. For there was Del. Howard P. Rawlings Thursday morning, trying to take part in the democratic process by announcing his support of a candidate not named Lawrence Bell, and he could not raise his voice loud enough to be heard 10 feet away.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 28, 1999
THOUGH the morning was splendid and sunny, Lawrence Bell went indoors to make his announcement. Smart move. Speaking from the base of City Hall's beautiful 119-foot rotunda, Bell's voice boomed and echoed off the marble and seemed to ascend to a height his words could not match.Making the big, inspiring speech is not among Bell's strengths. Which doesn't disqualify him for mayor. William Donald Schaefer was mayor for 15 years, and listening to him give a speech was like watching a blindfolded kid play connect-the-dots.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,SUN COLUMNIST | September 8, 1999
Lawrence Bell was doing fine, smiling, looking right into the camera, offering imaginative proposals for his first term as mayor of Baltimore. He said he'd create a Government Efficiency Hotline, get police officers to volunteer 10 hours each to "jump-start" a new effort against crime, renew the city's dollar-house rehabilitation program. It was good stuff.And then he pulled the Crown Central Petroleum card.There it was again -- on live television, about 8: 45 p.m.During last night's debate involving the three main Democratic candidates for mayor, Bell turned to Martin O'Malley, the white man in the group, and asked, again, about O'Malley's defense of his position regarding Crown Central.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 7, 1999
WHEN LAST seen in the full flowering of his devotion to civic virtue, brotherhood and the democratic process, Robert Clay was getting into Del. Howard "Pete" Rawlings' face for his perceived crime of daring to endorse Martin O'Malley for mayor of Baltimore.As Rawlings strode across War Memorial Plaza early last month, that was Clay standing next to Julius Henson, who was then the key trouble-shooter (and creator) for Lawrence Bell. Henson was the one screaming at Rawlings. Clay was the one standing next to Henson, holding aloft the sign that said, "O'Malley is A Hypocrite."
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